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Special Issue "Sustainable Heritage Management"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainability of Culture and Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 September 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Ataa Alsalloum

Lecturer in Architecture and Urban Heritage, School of Architecture, University of Liverpool
Website | E-Mail
Interests: heritage management and development; heritage policies; sustainable heritage; heritage-let post-conflict reconciliation; heritage in the Middle East and North Africa; Arabian vernacular architecture and urbanism; heritage-led urban design
Guest Editor
Prof. André Brown

Maxwell Fry Professor of Architecture, School of Architecture, The University of Liverpool, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: digital heritage; heritage building recording and conservation; lost and unbuilt architecture; heritage policies; structure and construction code application to heritage buildings

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The purpose of this Special Issue is to show progress regarding current research, literature and practice in the distinctive theme of sustainable heritage management. In particular, this Special Issue aspires to expand the discussion and scholarship on the range of viewpoints, trends, approaches, cases, success factors, impacts, challenges, models and/or frameworks of relevance to the relationships between heritage management and sustainability.

A high diversity of interest in various types of heritage including, but not limited to: cultural, intangible, modern, digital, cultural routes and historic urban landscape, both academically and applied contexts at the international level is covered in this Special Issue.

This Special Issue aims to explore further sustainable heritage management outcomes and success factors in an interdisciplinary and multi-sectorial approach. Potential areas of focus may include, but not be limited to the following within the context of sustainable heritage management and development:

  • Cultural heritage—assessment, management, marketing and publicity, tangible and intangible dimensions;
  • Sustainable development—preservation, conservation, restoration, rehabilitation, reconstruction, demolition, best practices, unsustainable development and consequent threats;
  • Cultural heritage and sustainable development—legislation, Cultural Heritage Impact Assessment, effects of climate change, ecological sustainability, social sustainability, economic sustainability;
  • Post-conflict reconciliation and sustainable peace;
  • Digital heritage and sustainable development;
  • Modern heritage and sustainable heritage.
  • Contemporary code application to Heritage Buildings

Dr. Ataa Alsalloum
Prof. André Brown
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable development (sub-keywords) preservation, conservation, restoration, rehabilitation, reconstruction, demolition, best practices, unsustainable development
  • post-conflict reconstruction
  • intangible heritage and development
  • sustainable cultural heritage management
  • heritage policies/legislations
  • community-led heritage
  • contemporary sustainable heritage
  • digital heritage

Published Papers (15 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Keeping Watch on Intangible Cultural Heritage: Live Transmission and Sustainable Development of Chinese Lacquer Art
Sustainability 2019, 11(14), 3868; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11143868
Received: 19 May 2019 / Revised: 1 July 2019 / Accepted: 9 July 2019 / Published: 16 July 2019
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Abstract
Countries all over the world have been constantly exploring ways to rescue and protect intangible cultural heritage. While learning from other countries’ protection measures, the Chinese government is also constantly exploring ways that conform to China’s national conditions. As China’s first batch of [...] Read more.
Countries all over the world have been constantly exploring ways to rescue and protect intangible cultural heritage. While learning from other countries’ protection measures, the Chinese government is also constantly exploring ways that conform to China’s national conditions. As China’s first batch of intangible cultural heritage, lacquer art boasts a brilliant history, but many people are not familiar with it today. Moreover, in the process of modernization, the lacquer art transmission is declining day by day, and it is facing unprecedented major crises such as loss and division of history into periods. Hence, it is essential to verify and reveal the challenges and dilemmas in the lacquer art transmission, and come up with corresponding protection measures around these problems. First of all, this research, through literature review, “horizontally” explores the current research status and the universal problems of lacquer art transmission from the macro level. With a view to make up for the deficiencies of the existing research and further supplement the empirical evidence, the current research, with the transmission of “Chengdu lacquer art” as an example and through in-depth interviews, tracks and investigates the whole process of transmission of Chengdu Lacquer Art Training Institute, and “vertically” analyzes the survival situation of lacquer art transmission and the core problems affecting transmission behaviors from the micro level. In the final conclusion, the research comes up with corresponding countermeasures and suggestions for the identified key problems, which is of significant reference value for facilitating the live transmission and sustainable development of Chinese lacquer art. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Heritage Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Digitizing Vanishing Architectural Heritage; The Design and Development of Qatar Historic Buildings Information Modeling [Q-HBIM] Platform
Sustainability 2019, 11(9), 2501; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11092501
Received: 1 February 2019 / Revised: 3 April 2019 / Accepted: 15 April 2019 / Published: 29 April 2019
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Abstract
The documentation of vanishing architectural heritage includes intensive information and data gathering, filtering, classification and digitization. Enabling such an endeavor necessitates the act of documentation, which requires the cooperation of several professionals from different fields, extensive resources, precise organization, and robust structuring. Therefore, [...] Read more.
The documentation of vanishing architectural heritage includes intensive information and data gathering, filtering, classification and digitization. Enabling such an endeavor necessitates the act of documentation, which requires the cooperation of several professionals from different fields, extensive resources, precise organization, and robust structuring. Therefore, the design and development of an innovative digital platform to facilitate the interaction between users from different specialties is highly desirable to enable dynamic real-time preservation and protection of such invaluable heritage. The aim of this study is to investigate the existing Qatari built heritage, urban conservation methods and the principles of modern digitizing and archiving techniques to create a sustainable and interactive archiving platform—Qatar Historic Buildings Information Modeling (Q-HBIM) platform. This unique digital platform aims to respond to the needs of the society as well as the experts in the fields of urban heritage conservation and buildings restoration. A literature review was conducted on topics relating to Qatar urban heritage and the principles of three-dimensional digitization technology including an exploration of the aspects of sustainable urban preservation. Accordingly, site analysis (physical, photogrammetric and 3D scanning techniques were used), and in-depth interviews were adopted as the main data collection techniques. The findings of this study elucidate the principles of innovative architectural heritage digitization tools involving Building Information Modeling (BIM) technology and processes. It is anticipated that the present work will formulate an advanced and unique interactive archiving tool in the context of Qatar and GCC/MENA regions in the shape of the: Qatar Historic Building Information Modeling (Q-HBIM) platform. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Heritage Management)
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Open AccessArticle
A Holistic Overview of Qatar’s (Built) Cultural Heritage; Towards an Integrated Sustainable Conservation Strategy
Sustainability 2019, 11(8), 2277; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11082277
Received: 1 February 2019 / Revised: 6 April 2019 / Accepted: 9 April 2019 / Published: 16 April 2019
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Abstract
Historic urban cores are the backbone of a city’s cultural identity. Maintaining and preserving the socio-cultural, environmental and economic characteristics of the built heritage is vital for cultural identity survival. The Gulf region gathered important architectural and urban richness observed through the massive [...] Read more.
Historic urban cores are the backbone of a city’s cultural identity. Maintaining and preserving the socio-cultural, environmental and economic characteristics of the built heritage is vital for cultural identity survival. The Gulf region gathered important architectural and urban richness observed through the massive military towers, mosques, houses, palaces and grand souks. The state of Qatar is under huge pressure to preserve its cultural identity, which resulted from the rapid development, population growth, urban expansion and economic boom since the 1970s. The cities of Qatar are facing difficult challenges to preserve the cultural identity and built heritage without compromising the need for development. Consequently, this study aims to define a set of heritage restoration-preservation tools and an integrated sustainable conservation strategy as part of deliberate planning and design processes. This, certainly, will help achieve sustainable future scenarios for the survival of vernacular architecture and historic buildings in Qatar through their sustained adaptive (re)use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Heritage Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Sustainable Use of Cultural Heritage in the Formation of Healing Environments: A Case Study of a Healthcare Facility on a Historic Urban Site
Sustainability 2019, 11(7), 1866; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11071866
Received: 28 February 2019 / Revised: 20 March 2019 / Accepted: 22 March 2019 / Published: 28 March 2019
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Abstract
Seoul National University (SNU) Medical Campus and Hospital has undergone constant changes throughout its history, from its beginnings as the site of Kyungmo Palace, to its later development as Seoul Daehan Hospital. In the process of this change, the campus has become layered [...] Read more.
Seoul National University (SNU) Medical Campus and Hospital has undergone constant changes throughout its history, from its beginnings as the site of Kyungmo Palace, to its later development as Seoul Daehan Hospital. In the process of this change, the campus has become layered with sites of historical and cultural heritage and various architectural styles. This study examines the spatial location of medical/education facilities and their connectivity to heritage sites, and the formation of a “healing environment” that utilizes the historical/cultural heritage of SNU Medical Campus and Hospital, as well as the resulting sustainability of these heritage sites. This is accomplished by analyzing the layout of facilities, the spatial composition of the campus, and historical/cultural factors. The formation of healing environments for healthcare facilities traditionally employs the natural environment, and healing environments in urban areas commonly utilize landscapes. SNU Medical Campus and Hospital is an excellent case study for the future potential of utilizing cultural heritage sites as healing environments. The formation of a healing environment for medical spaces that utilizes the historical and cultural environment gives new meaning to cultural heritage through their sustainable use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Heritage Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Towards a Heritage-Led Sustainable Post-Conflict Reconciliation: A Policy-Led Perspective
Sustainability 2019, 11(6), 1686; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11061686
Received: 13 January 2019 / Revised: 12 March 2019 / Accepted: 14 March 2019 / Published: 20 March 2019
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Abstract
In today’s context, threats to heritage sites posed by armed conflicts are prevalent. This article argues for an urgently needed framework, based on authoritative heritage policy documents, to guide sustainable reconciliation in such circumstances. The methodological approach proposed derives from a content analysis [...] Read more.
In today’s context, threats to heritage sites posed by armed conflicts are prevalent. This article argues for an urgently needed framework, based on authoritative heritage policy documents, to guide sustainable reconciliation in such circumstances. The methodological approach proposed derives from a content analysis strategy that investigated a selected list of documents. Key extractions are then synthesised to develop useful recommendations for sustainable post-conflict reconciliation in heritage contexts. This conceptual framework also helps to achieve the potential re-nomination of any reconstructed sites which, in turn, provides both additional robust protection of heritage values, and supports sustainable development. This article presents the first part of a broader research study and is intended to communicate the results to a multi-faceted international audience including stakeholders, along with policy and decision makers in the world heritage field. The application of the proposed framework to the world heritage cities of Damascus and Aleppo is the subject of the second part of this research and is presented in a subsequent paper in this special issue of the journal Sustainability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Heritage Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Identifying the Critical Stakeholders for the Sustainable Development of Architectural Heritage of Tourism: From the Perspective of China
Sustainability 2019, 11(6), 1671; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11061671
Received: 27 February 2019 / Revised: 15 March 2019 / Accepted: 16 March 2019 / Published: 20 March 2019
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1475 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Architectural heritages, especially heritages of tourism, were destroyed in the process of urban reconstruction of China because of lacking protection from stakeholders. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify the critical stakeholders to perform the responsibility of protection. The paper, focusing on [...] Read more.
Architectural heritages, especially heritages of tourism, were destroyed in the process of urban reconstruction of China because of lacking protection from stakeholders. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify the critical stakeholders to perform the responsibility of protection. The paper, focusing on architectural heritage of tourism, aims to identify the most important stakeholders for making them realize their critical roles in maintaining architectural heritages. Moreover, this paper also aims to evaluate the enthusiasm of stakeholders. As a result, the stakeholders with high importance and enthusiasm would be the critical stakeholders in maintaining architectural heritages. Thirteen stakeholders were selected through comprehensive literature review and the reality of China. A questionnaire survey was conducted with the qualified respondents in Mainland China. A five-point Likert scale and other statistical methods were used for achieving the results of evaluation. The findings demonstrated local government, central government, real estate development enterprise, expert groups, administration of architectural heritage protection, and construction company of architectural heritage are considered as the critical stakeholders for the sustainable development (SD) of architectural heritage of tourism. Finally, some helpful implications were introduced for improving the efficiency of participation and cooperation among all stakeholders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Heritage Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Vertical Co-operation in Creative Micro-Enterprises: A Case Study of Textile Crafts of Matiari District, Pakistan
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 920; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030920
Received: 30 December 2018 / Revised: 27 January 2019 / Accepted: 30 January 2019 / Published: 12 February 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (843 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Despite their cultural and economic importance, creative micro-enterprises have received very little attention from academia research, especially with respect to vertical co-operation—customers and suppliers—and innovation. This study aims to fill the literature gap by studying how vertical co-operation improves the performance of micro-enterprises [...] Read more.
Despite their cultural and economic importance, creative micro-enterprises have received very little attention from academia research, especially with respect to vertical co-operation—customers and suppliers—and innovation. This study aims to fill the literature gap by studying how vertical co-operation improves the performance of micro-enterprises in textile crafts through innovation. A questionnaire was used to collect data from creative micro-enterprises in the textile craft sector operating in the Matiari District of Pakistan. To test the construct validity of the research, Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) were conducted, and to examine the hypotheses, the bootstrap re-sampling method was used with the SPSS PROCESS macro developed by Hayes. The findings of this study indicate that vertical co-operation positively and significantly affects the innovation and performance of creative micro-enterprises in textile crafts. In addition, we find that innovation plays a significant mediating role between vertical co-operation and performance. Furthermore, contrary to some studies, we empirically provide evidence regarding innovation in craft in terms of product development (design, size, shape, color, etc.), improvement in quality, and replacement/modification of tools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Heritage Management)
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Open AccessArticle
The Importance of Checking Indoor Air Quality in Underground Historic Buildings Intended for Tourist Use
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 689; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030689
Received: 14 November 2018 / Revised: 9 December 2018 / Accepted: 23 December 2018 / Published: 28 January 2019
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Abstract
This article demonstrates the importance of quantifying the air quality with radon gas level as indicator in any heritage building, especially those intended for the use of people. The tourist activity or historical guide represents a typology where people spend a certain time, [...] Read more.
This article demonstrates the importance of quantifying the air quality with radon gas level as indicator in any heritage building, especially those intended for the use of people. The tourist activity or historical guide represents a typology where people spend a certain time, that is to say, in no case do they spend the same amount of hours as in their homes or jobs. Different gases that may be present in the environment must be controlled. The Séneca Square shelter, in Alicante, is a very important place for the history of the city during the Spanish Civil War that has recently been rehabilitated for exposure to people. The source of most radon gas inside a building is the ground. Many countries, including Spain, in which the building regulations, regarding the accumulation of radon gas, do not specify in their technical codes, the maximum dose that a building can sustain so that it is not harmful to people, or, the measures required to correct excessive accumulation. The possible existence of radon is verified in any underground building, regardless of the characteristics of the soil (whether granitic or not), the importance of defining and unifying the regulations that specify the different levels of radon in any architectural constructions is evident. Most of the scientific agencies in the field of medicine and health, consider that radon gas is a very harmful element for people. This element in its gaseous state is radioactive and it is present in almost all soils in which buildings are implanted, with granitic types of soil presenting higher levels of radon gas. Non-granitic soils have traditionally been considered to have very low radon levels. However, this work, providing the results of the research carried out in the underground air raid shelter in Seneca Square in Alicante (Spain), demonstrates the relevant presence of radon in non-granitic soils. This research addresses the constructive typology of the underground building and the radon presence in its interior obtained using rigorous measurement techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Heritage Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Does the Olympic Agenda 2020 Have the Power to Create a New Olympic Heritage? An Analysis for the 2026 Winter Olympic Games Bid
Sustainability 2019, 11(2), 442; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11020442
Received: 30 November 2018 / Revised: 9 January 2019 / Accepted: 10 January 2019 / Published: 16 January 2019
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Abstract
The International Olympic Committee (IOC) lacks candidates willing to host the Olympic Games (OG) and has reacted to this situation by introducing the Olympic Agenda 2020 (OA)—a reform process making the OG more attractive for potential hosts. This study analyzes whether the OA [...] Read more.
The International Olympic Committee (IOC) lacks candidates willing to host the Olympic Games (OG) and has reacted to this situation by introducing the Olympic Agenda 2020 (OA)—a reform process making the OG more attractive for potential hosts. This study analyzes whether the OA plays a crucial role for the future of the OG. We, therefore, examined the official IOC documents and feasibility studies of the 2026 Winter Olympic Games (WOG) bidders and conducted qualitative interviews with experts in the field (n = 15). The results reveal that the 2026 WOG hosts plan to reduce the budgets for the organization and the infrastructure costs in the host regions. As a consequence, the number and nature of the sites and venues as well as the distances between them will increase. This means that the future Olympic heritage (OH) may lay less in iconic buildings but rather focus on the attempt to fulfil the city’s long-term strategies. Our analyses extend the literature by: (1) analysing the OA in view of future OG, (2) comparing experiences from past OG with those of current bidders, (3) integrating expert knowledge thanks to qualitative interviews and, finally, (4) considering new heritage concepts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Heritage Management)
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Open AccessArticle
New Drawings of the Alhambra: Deformations of Muqarnas in the Pendentives of the Sala de la Barca
Sustainability 2019, 11(2), 316; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11020316
Received: 27 November 2018 / Revised: 24 December 2018 / Accepted: 27 December 2018 / Published: 9 January 2019
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Abstract
Architectural heritage preservation and sustainability need advanced graphic techniques in order to document and understand the disposition/composition of plaster muqarnas, a fragile construction element. The muqarnas are key elements in the Nasrid architecture developed during the 14th century in the Alhambra complex, nowadays [...] Read more.
Architectural heritage preservation and sustainability need advanced graphic techniques in order to document and understand the disposition/composition of plaster muqarnas, a fragile construction element. The muqarnas are key elements in the Nasrid architecture developed during the 14th century in the Alhambra complex, nowadays part of World Heritage. As a case study, this analysis focuses on the muqarnas pendentives of the Sala de la Barca in the Comares Palace. After examining both explanations and drawings published by architects Jones and Goury from 1842 to 1845, our research provides new drawings (plans and elevations) derived from laser scanner technology. Theoretically, though muqarnas are composed of simple geometrical shapes, these new drawings unveil important deformations hitherto unknown, and which have not been studied yet by other bibliographic references. Finally, we provide some considerations about the causes of these deformations and the monument sustainability across the time and the images’ capacity to show the muqarnas complex shapes in a reliable way. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Heritage Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Conflict and Impacts Generated by the Filming of Discovery Channel’s Reality Series “Naked and Afraid” in the Amazon: A Special Case in the Cuyabeno Wildlife Reserve, Ecuador
Sustainability 2019, 11(1), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11010050
Received: 28 November 2018 / Revised: 17 December 2018 / Accepted: 19 December 2018 / Published: 21 December 2018
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Abstract
Conflicts and ecological impacts in natural protected areas can arise for various reasons. The behavior of social stakeholders in the face of conflict is the object of study. Their reactions can be varied according to the personal interests of the parties. Conflicts can [...] Read more.
Conflicts and ecological impacts in natural protected areas can arise for various reasons. The behavior of social stakeholders in the face of conflict is the object of study. Their reactions can be varied according to the personal interests of the parties. Conflicts can cause changes in the communities, incomprehensibly affecting the environment and ultimately transforming their lives. Although the environmental impacts have generally been well studied in protected areas, after reviewing the literature, it was observed that very few studies exist on the local economic conflicts that frequently arise. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the socio-ecological conflicts and impacts generated by the filming of the American reality series Naked and Afraid, produced by the Discovery Channel in the Ecuadorian Amazon—a special case in the Cuyabeno Wildlife Reserve. The data was gathered from numerous primary sources, including field interviews with the regional stakeholders involved and a video analysis of the Discovery Channels’ Naked and Afraid. The results of our study conclude several interesting insights into various social and ecological conflicts and their resulting impacts on the Cuyabeno Wildlife Reserve. The first of these concerns the high impacts mainly associated with biotic components in the Reserve. The second set of interesting findings are social conflicts that were caused by the discontent of the Indigenous communities in relation to royalties and compensations left by the filming. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Heritage Management)
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Open AccessArticle
A Small-Scale Event and a Big Impact—Is This Relationship Possible in the World of Sport? The Meaning of Heritage Sporting Events for Sustainable Development of Tourism—Experiences from Poland
Sustainability 2018, 10(11), 4289; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10114289
Received: 20 October 2018 / Revised: 11 November 2018 / Accepted: 14 November 2018 / Published: 19 November 2018
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Abstract
The theoretical part of this article presents the meaning of sporting events for the tourism industry and the importance of sporting events at a small scale, as well as heritage sporting events for sustainable development of tourist destinations. The literature review shows that [...] Read more.
The theoretical part of this article presents the meaning of sporting events for the tourism industry and the importance of sporting events at a small scale, as well as heritage sporting events for sustainable development of tourist destinations. The literature review shows that there is a clear research gap with respect to the analysis of economic and social impacts of small-scale events. The empirical research was conducted by the method of a diagnostic survey during three sporting events of different rank, which took place in Poland and represented various sports disciplines—running, horse riding, and swimming. A total of 2098 respondents took part in the study, including sports tourists and resident-hosts who took part in the studied events. The aim of the study was to examine whether there is a link between the rank of a sporting event, the development of tourism, and the impact on the host city’s image. The results of the study showed that the highest additional tourism activity in the city on the occasion of participation in an event as an athlete or supporter was undertaken by the participants of the lowest ranked sporting event (Half-Marathon). They also gave the highest rating of the positive impact of a sporting event on the host city’s image. The hosts also rated the highest social impact from the Half-Marathon (i.e., increased sense of pride, social integration, and local identity). Events related to the heritage of the sport of a given region and other smaller-scale sporting events, including mass sports and recreation events (e.g., marathons and other running events), provide an alternative to homogenized, commercial, and very expensive sporting events in the world and may contribute to the sustainable development of tourist regions. The research results show that big social potential lies in the organization of small-scale sports events. The reflections contained in this article may inspire the organization of small-scale sporting events and the continued care for sporting events related to the cultural heritage of a given region. Events of this kind successfully impact tourist revival and improvement of the regions’ image. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Heritage Management)
Open AccessArticle
Effect of Roads on Ecological Corridors Used for Wildlife Movement in a Natural Heritage Site
Sustainability 2018, 10(8), 2725; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10082725
Received: 24 May 2018 / Revised: 13 July 2018 / Accepted: 27 July 2018 / Published: 2 August 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (5194 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Roads are the link between geographic space and human socio-economic activities, promoting local economic development, and simultaneously causing various negative effects, such as segmentation, interference, destruction, degradation, and pollution. In China, the construction of roads is rapid, which might affect wildlife movement, landscape [...] Read more.
Roads are the link between geographic space and human socio-economic activities, promoting local economic development, and simultaneously causing various negative effects, such as segmentation, interference, destruction, degradation, and pollution. In China, the construction of roads is rapid, which might affect wildlife movement, landscape pattern, and land use change, thereby, affecting the conservation of heritage sites. In the present study, the minimum cumulative resistance model, along with geographic information system technology, was adopted to compute the ecological corridor for wildlife movement between the source patches and to analyze ecological corridor changes under two conditions (road presence/absence) at two time points in Kanas, nominated as a World Natural Heritage site. The relationships between the ecological corridor changes and various factors, including the cutting index of the ‘road-effect zones’, terrain, and road geometric characteristics, were examined using the geographical detector model to identify the influencing factors and mechanisms of the corridor changes, in order to rationally simulate the potential ecological corridors. In addition, the detached and fragmented ecological patches can be connected to effectively protect the biodiversity, biological habitats, and species, which are important means to achieve regional sustainable development and ecological construction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Heritage Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Interpretation of a Local Museum in Thailand
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2563; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072563
Received: 25 April 2018 / Revised: 12 July 2018 / Accepted: 19 July 2018 / Published: 21 July 2018
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Abstract
This paper considers the interpretation of a local museum in Thailand using the local museum of Thai Bueng Khok Salung as a case study. Data collection was carried out from 9 September 2015 to 22 January 2018. The collected data were derived from [...] Read more.
This paper considers the interpretation of a local museum in Thailand using the local museum of Thai Bueng Khok Salung as a case study. Data collection was carried out from 9 September 2015 to 22 January 2018. The collected data were derived from related documents, previous studies, in-depth interviews and observations. This present research aimed to investigate the interpretation of the case study through the management of “persons, places, and things”. The findings revealed that there are two major types of interpretation at the museum: the interpretation for the people in the community (that is, indigenous curators, local visitors, and local people) and the interpretation for the people outside the community (that is, general visitors and specific-purpose visitors). The results of the study indicate an appropriate and effective interpretation system for the specific community context which encourages people—both locals and foreigners—to be aware of the value of the community. Consequently, as a result of their awareness, people would increasingly cherish their community and work in collaboration with other people for the sustainable development of the community. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Heritage Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Economic Valuation of Cultural Heritage: Application of Travel Cost Method to the National Museum and Research Center of Altamira
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2550; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072550
Received: 11 June 2018 / Revised: 10 July 2018 / Accepted: 19 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (998 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The economic assessment of non-marketed resources (i.e., cultural heritage) can be developed with stated or revealed preference methods. Travel cost method (TCM) is based on the demand theory and assumes that the demand for a recreational site is inversely related to the travel [...] Read more.
The economic assessment of non-marketed resources (i.e., cultural heritage) can be developed with stated or revealed preference methods. Travel cost method (TCM) is based on the demand theory and assumes that the demand for a recreational site is inversely related to the travel costs that a certain visitor must face to enjoy it. Its application requires data about the tourist’s origin. This work aims to analyze the economic value of the National Museum and Research Center of Altamira, which was created to research, conserve, and broadcast the Cave of Altamira (UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1985). It includes an accurate replica known as the “Neocave”. Two different TCM approaches have been applied to obtain the demand curve of the museum, which is a powerful tool that helps to assess past and future investments. It has also provided the annual economic value estimate of the National Museum and Research Center of Altamira, which varies between 4.75 and 8.00 million € per year. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Heritage Management)
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