Special Issue "Risk-Informed Sustainable Development in the Rural Tropics"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Maurizio Tiepolo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
DIST-Politecnico and University of Turin, Italy
Interests: climate change adaptation; risk management; sustainable local development; urban and regional planning
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Vieri Tarchiani
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Istituto di bioecomomia, National Research Council of Italy, Florence, Italy
Interests: agrometeorology; climate services; disaster risk reduction
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Alessandro Pezzoli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
DIST- Politecnico and University of Turin, Italy
Interests: climate indices; hydroclimatic risk
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Efforts to achieve sustainable rural development are often thwarted by hydroclimatic disasters (droughts, flooding, storms, typhoons) which local communities are little prepared to tackle. Understanding these disasters, improving preparation, and strengthening governance have become equal priorities of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) (2015). In recent years, however, the implementation of actions at local scale to achieve the objectives of the Sendai framework has come across innumerable obstacles. It is often the case that agricultural practices and local planning are not very risk-informed. Climatic information is absent or not accessible locally. Early warning systems and climate services are not constructed with and for the rural communities. Vulnerability and risk assessments are misaligned with risk prevention and preparedness local plans. Finally, the frequency and nature of DRR mainstreaming in municipal development plans is actually unknown. These deficiencies are particularly acute in the Tropics, where the majority of least developed countries are located and where there is, however, great potential for agricultural development.

As a consequence, this Special Issue is focused on rural Tropics, involving the local administrative level (individual municipalities and individual rural communities) and local scale (associations of smallholder farmers, groupings of specialist producers, cooperatives).

Our aim is to investigate information on the hydroclimatic risks (production, organization, accessibility) and the use of that information in agricultural practices and in local planning. We seek studies of individual cases (best practices), critical reviews, and theoretical papers originating from different academic fields dealing with a variety of topics, including:

  • Open data on disasters;
  • Non-stationary approaches to floods;
  • Local climate scenarios;
  • Early warning systems;
  • Multihazard risk assessments for local planning;
  • Hydroclimatic risk prevention, development plans, and aid at local scale;
  • Capacity building for co-development of weather and climate services;
  • Agrometeorological services for small farmers;
  • Crop monitoring for food security;
  • Climate change opportunities in agriculture.

References:

  1. Fiorillo, E.; Crisci, A.; Issa, H.; Morabito, M.; Tarchiani V. Recent changes of floods and related impacts in Niger based on the ANADIA Niger flood database. Climate 2018
  2. Deichmann, U., Goyal, A.; Mishra, D. Will digital technologies transform agriculture in Developing Countries? World Bank Policy Research Working Paper 2016, 7669
  3. Brasseur, G.P.; Gallardo, L. Climate services: Lessons learned and future prospects, Earth’s Future 2016, 4, 79–89
  4. Ouedraogo, M.; Barry, S.; Zougmoré, RB.; Partey, S.T.; Somé, L.; Baki G. Farmers’ willingness to pay for climate information services: evidence from cowpea and sesame producers in Northern Burkina Faso. Sustainability 2018, 10, 611
  5. Tall, A.; Coulibaly, J.Y.; Diop, M. Do climate services make a difference? A review of evaluation methodologies and practices to assess the value of climate information services for farmers: implication s for Africa. Climate Services 2018, 11, 1-12
  6. Pasquini, L.; Ziervogel, G.; Cowling R.M.; Shearing C. What enables local governments to mainstream climate change adaptation? Lessons learned from two municipal case studies in the Western Cape, South Africa. Climate and Development 2015, 7(1)
  7. Lyles, W.; Berke, P.; Smith, G. A comparison of local hazard mitigation plan quality in six states, USA. Landscape and Urban Planning 2014, 122, 89-99
  8. Horney, J., Nguyen, M., Salvesen, D., Dwyer, C., Cooper, J. Berke, P. Assessing the quality of rural hazard mitigation plans in the Southeastern United States. J Planning Education Research 2017 37(1), 56-65
  9. Lavell, A.; Maskrey, A. The future of disaster risk management. Environmental Hazards 2014, 13(4), 267–280
  10. Thomalla, F.; Boyland, M.; Johnson, K.; Ensor, J.; Tuhkanen, H.; Gerger Swartling, Å.; Wahl, D. Transforming development and disaster risk. Sustainability 2018, 10(5), 1458
  11. Steenkamp, P.J.; Van Heerden, H.; Van Schalkwyk, O.L. Ecological suitability modeling for anthrax in the Kruger National Park, South Africa, PloS one 2018, 13(1)
  12. Zia A.; Wagner, C.H. Mainstreaming early warning systems in development and planning processes: Multilevel implementation of Sendai framework in Indus and Sahel. Int J Disaster Risk Sci 2015 6, 189-199
  13. Gautam, D.K.; Phaiju, A.G. Community based approach to flood early warning in West Rapti river basin in Nepal. J integrated Disaster Risk Management 2013, 3(1), 155-169
  14. Spielman, D.J.; Ekboir, J.; Davis, K.; Ochieng, C.M.O. An innovation systems perspective on strengthening agricultural education and training in Sub-Saharan Africa, Agricultural Systems 2008, 98, 1-9
  15. Altieri, M.A.; Nicholls, C.I. The adaptation and mitigation potential of traditional agriculture in a changing climate. Climatic Change 2017, 140, 33-4
  16. Meijer, S.S.; Catacutan, D.; Ajayi, O.C.; Sileshi, G.W.; Nieuwenhuis, M. The role of knowledge, attitudes and perceptions in the uptake of agricultural and agroforestry innovations among smallholder farmers in sub-Saharan Africa, International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability, 2015, 13:1, 40-54.

Prof. Dr. Maurizio Tiepolo
Dr. Vieri Tarchiani
Prof. Dr. Alessandro Pezzoli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • climate services
  • disaster risk reduction
  • drought
  • early warning systems
  • emergency plans
  • flooding
  • local development plans
  • loss and damages open data
  • multihazard
  • risk assessment
  • risk prevention
  • risk reduction plans
  • vulnerability assessment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Multi-Hazard Risk Assessment at Community Level Integrating Local and Scientific Knowledge in the Hodh Chargui, Mauritania
Sustainability 2019, 11(18), 5063; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11185063 - 16 Sep 2019
Abstract
Hydro-climatic risk assessments at the regional scale are of little use in the risk treatment decision-making process when they are only based on local or scientific knowledge and when they deal with a single risk at a time. Local and scientific knowledge can [...] Read more.
Hydro-climatic risk assessments at the regional scale are of little use in the risk treatment decision-making process when they are only based on local or scientific knowledge and when they deal with a single risk at a time. Local and scientific knowledge can be combined in a multi-hazard risk assessment to contribute to sustainable rural development. The aim of this article was to develop a multi-hazard risk assessment at the regional scale which classifies communities according to the risk level, proposes risk treatment actions, and can be replicated in the agropastoral, semi-arid Tropics. The level of multi-hazard risk of 13 communities of Hodh Chargui (Mauritania) exposed to meteorological, hydrological, and agricultural drought, as well as heavy precipitations, was ascertained with an index composed of 48 indicators representing hazard, exposure, vulnerability, and adaptive capacity. Community meetings and visits to exposed items enabled specific indicators to be identified. Scientific knowledge was used to determine the hazard with Climate Hazards Group Infra-Red Precipitation with Station (CHIRPS) and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) datasets, Landsat images, and the method used to rank the communities. The northern communities are at greater risk of agricultural drought and those at the foot of the uplands are more at risk of heavy rains and consequent flash floods. The assessment proposes 12 types of actions to treat the risk in the six communities with severe and high multi-hazard risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk-Informed Sustainable Development in the Rural Tropics)
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Open AccessArticle
Flood Assessment for Risk-Informed Planning along the Sirba River, Niger
Sustainability 2019, 11(15), 4003; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11154003 - 24 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
South of the Sahara, flood vulnerability and risk assessments at local level rarely identify the exposed areas according to the probability of flooding or the actions in place, or localize the exposed items. They are, therefore, of little use for local development, risk [...] Read more.
South of the Sahara, flood vulnerability and risk assessments at local level rarely identify the exposed areas according to the probability of flooding or the actions in place, or localize the exposed items. They are, therefore, of little use for local development, risk prevention, and contingency planning. The aim of this article is to assess the flood risk, providing useful information for local planning and an assessment methodology useful for other case studies. As a result, the first step involves identifying the information required by the local plans most used south of the Sahara. Four rural communities in Niger, frequently flooded by the Sirba River, are then considered. The risk is the product of the probability of a flood multiplied by the potential damage. Local knowledge and knowledge derived from a hydraulic numerical model, digital terrain model, very high resolution multispectral orthoimages, and daily precipitation are used. The assessment identifies the probability of fluvial and pluvial flooding, the exposed areas, the position, quantity, type, replacement value of exposed items, and the risk level according to three flooding scenarios. Fifteen actions are suggested to reduce the risk and to turn adversity into opportunity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk-Informed Sustainable Development in the Rural Tropics)
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