Special Issue "Attitude towards Luxury Brands and Sustainable Development: New Challenges for Business"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Economic and Business Aspects of Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Tonino Pencarelli
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Guest Editor
Faculty of Economics, University of Urbino “Carlo Bo”, Urbino, Italy
Interests: tourism management; sustainability management; branding and communication; corporate strategies; experiential marketing
Dr. Emanuela Conti
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Economics, Political Society, University of Urbino Carlo Bo, Urbino, Italy
Interests: design driven innovation; luxury industries management; cultural heritage management; sustainability management; experiential marketing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Luxury consumers are increasingly interested in the social and environmental sustainability of the luxury goods they buy, and, therefore, the challenge for luxury companies is to integrate sustainability and brand development. However, it is still not entirely clear to what extent luxury and sustainability can be harmonized and what really are the opinions of luxury consumers on sustainability. In particular, a deep understanding of the luxury consumers perception of the social and environmental dimensions of sustainability is needed. On the other hand, it is important to further investigate how important luxury brands consider sustainability and how much they are aware of the topic. Also, there is a need to investigate the role of sustainability in the strategies adopted by brands along the entire luxury supply chain and in CSR and benefit corporation. Do corporate strategies really meet the challenges of sustainability in the luxury market by adopting authentic CSR strategies in all the global supply chain activities, or are they limited to communication actions? This Special Issue aims to discuss contributions to luxury and sustainable development from the supply and demand perspective. We invite you to contribute to this Issue by submitting comprehensive reviews, case studies, or research articles. Papers selected for this Special Issue are subject to a rigorous peer review procedure with the aim of rapid and wide dissemination of research results, developments, and applications.

Prof. Dr. Tonino Pencarelli
Dr. Emanuela Conti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • luxury consumers
  • luxury brands
  • sustainable development
  • CSR and luxury
  • benefit corporation

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Factor Affecting Attitude and Purchase Intention of Luxury Fashion Product Consumption: A Case of Korean University Students
Sustainability 2020, 12(18), 7497; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12187497 - 11 Sep 2020
Viewed by 614
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to look into the factors affecting South Korean college students’ luxury goods purchases and their intent to buy them. A conceptual model was proposed and was tested by several hypotheses. Data were collected from Seoul, Daegu, and [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to look into the factors affecting South Korean college students’ luxury goods purchases and their intent to buy them. A conceptual model was proposed and was tested by several hypotheses. Data were collected from Seoul, Daegu, and Daejeon in South Korea. A total of 153 respondents took part in this survey, which was conducted on brand awareness, social contrast, acquisitive, innovation in fashion, engagement in fashion, buying luxury brand attitudes, and buying interest of luxury products. Factor analysis and regression analysis were done to test the hypotheses by using SPSS. The results of this study indicated a significant positive relationship between the buying intention of luxury products and brand awareness, social contrast, and innovation in fashion. This paper help manufacturer and marketing managers to make better marketing strategies for college students. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Examining Luxury Restaurant Dining Experience towards Sustainable Reputation of the Michelin Restaurant Guide
Sustainability 2020, 12(5), 2134; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12052134 - 10 Mar 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1270
Abstract
The study aims to investigate the formation of customer loyalty among luxury restaurant patrons in Korea. Moreover, the study investigated how the restaurants’ performance could contribute to the trust and sustainability of the Michelin restaurant guide’s reputation. The study identified meal experience, brand [...] Read more.
The study aims to investigate the formation of customer loyalty among luxury restaurant patrons in Korea. Moreover, the study investigated how the restaurants’ performance could contribute to the trust and sustainability of the Michelin restaurant guide’s reputation. The study identified meal experience, brand credibility, and brand love to influence customers’ revisit intention and willingness to pay a premium. The study surveyed 400 luxury restaurant patrons in Korea. The Michelin restaurant guide was used to classify fine dining restaurants. Measurement items from previously validated studies were adopted. The results of the study showed the meal experience scale satisfactorily measures service performance and leads to the formation of brand credibility. Subsequently, brand prestige and brand love significantly predicted customers’ loyalty intentions. Additionally, brand credibility helps form the trust of the Michelin guide and eventually predicts the long-term reputation of the guide. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Does Fashionization Impede Luxury Brands’ CSR Image?
Sustainability 2020, 12(1), 428; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010428 - 06 Jan 2020
Viewed by 1025
Abstract
To sustain their growth worldwide, luxury brands are increasingly adopting the codes of fast fashion. They continually introduce new designs that move quickly from the catwalk to stores to stay on-trend, resulting in short and constantly renewed collections. But does this fashionization impede [...] Read more.
To sustain their growth worldwide, luxury brands are increasingly adopting the codes of fast fashion. They continually introduce new designs that move quickly from the catwalk to stores to stay on-trend, resulting in short and constantly renewed collections. But does this fashionization impede luxury brands’ Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) image? This article investigates this question building on the ephemerality–scarcity dual-route model. Findings from a first experiment involving a fictitious luxury brand show that fashionization increases both perceptions of ephemerality (negative route) and scarcity (positive route), with opposing resulting effects on the brand’s CSR image. Extending these results to a real-life luxury setting, findings from a second experiment show that the influence of fashionization on the brand’s CSR image is only mediated by the positive scarcity route. This study provides a number of noteworthy theoretical insights and relevant managerial implications for luxury managers involved in CSR communication. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Luxury Products and Sustainability Issues from the Perspective of Young Italian Consumers
Sustainability 2020, 12(1), 245; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010245 - 27 Dec 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1664
Abstract
The aim of this study is to understand the actual preferences, behaviors, and purchasing decisions of young consumers in the context of sustainability, with an emphasis on luxury products. The primary objective of the research is to determine the impact of ‘sustainable tendencies’ [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to understand the actual preferences, behaviors, and purchasing decisions of young consumers in the context of sustainability, with an emphasis on luxury products. The primary objective of the research is to determine the impact of ‘sustainable tendencies’ on stimulating the purchase of luxury goods by the Italian Generation Z and Generation Y populations. In addition to examining the intergenerational differences in perception of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainable marketing, the study is aimed at investigating the potential intersection of the consumption of luxury products and the consumption of slow fashion. In particular, through an empirical analysis carried out on a sample of 1314 young consumers in Italy (representing the two generational cohorts), this research provides interesting results which demonstrate the importance of adopting differentiated CSR strategies which are attentive to sustainability based on the demographic characteristics of young consumers of luxury brands. Structural equation modeling is used to analyze and understand the structural relationships between variables. This study thus helps to fill the knowledge gap about the consumption orientation of the younger generations. The results of this study contribute to a growing body of literature on luxury brands and sustainability issues in marketing. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Celebrity Endorsement and the Attitude Towards Luxury Brands for Sustainable Consumption
Sustainability 2019, 11(23), 6791; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236791 - 29 Nov 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1686
Abstract
Taking into consideration the increasing role of sustainability in the luxury industry, our study investigates the role of celebrity credibility, celebrity familiarity, luxury brand value, and brand sustainability awareness on attitude towards celebrity, brand, and purchase intention for sustainable consumption. For this, we [...] Read more.
Taking into consideration the increasing role of sustainability in the luxury industry, our study investigates the role of celebrity credibility, celebrity familiarity, luxury brand value, and brand sustainability awareness on attitude towards celebrity, brand, and purchase intention for sustainable consumption. For this, we explored relationships among these variables to test a conceptual model which is developed using existing knowledge available in academic research on this topic. Data for testing were collected from high-end retail stores in the UK about the world top luxury brands by brand value in 2019, also acknowledged for their major engagement in sustainability. Findings from a survey of 514 consumers suggest that celebrity credibility is a very strong key to increasing purchase intentions of sustainable luxury goods. The study has important implications for the expansion of current literature, theory development and business practices. Limitations of the study are also outlined, and directions for future research are considered too. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Sustainability and Quality Management in the Italian Luxury Furniture Sector: A Circular Economy Perspective
Sustainability 2019, 11(11), 3089; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11113089 - 31 May 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1719
Abstract
The growing attention paid to global environmental risks has gradually raised interest, both on the agendas of firms and governments towards the development of new business models such as Circular Economy. This study is focused on the luxury furniture industry and it is [...] Read more.
The growing attention paid to global environmental risks has gradually raised interest, both on the agendas of firms and governments towards the development of new business models such as Circular Economy. This study is focused on the luxury furniture industry and it is aimed at investigating how much furniture companies know about Circular Economy practices, what they specifically do for implementing them and what factors motivate, support or hinder their adoption. The role of product and process certifications in developing such sustainable practices is also analyzed, given their importance for implementing environmentally sustainable practices. The research method is based on a qualitative multiple case study carried out on four Italian companies operating in the luxury furniture industry. A worthy degree of awareness and knowledge of Circular Economy principles emerged from the analysis. Nevertheless, furniture companies analyzed are still little involved in Circular Economy practices, especially concerning reuse and recycle actions, which are particularly important within this perspective. Similarly, very little use of process and product certifications emerged from the study. Therefore, a potential gap seems to arise between the positive attitude towards Circular Economy practices and their actual implementation, which suggests useful implications for both institutions and managers involved in sustainable development processes. Full article
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