Special Issue "Environmental Assessment, Life Cycle Analysis and Sustainability"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. George Banias
Website
Guest Editor
Center for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH), Institute for Bio-economy and Agri-technology (iBO), 6th km Charilaou-Thermi Rd, P.O. Box 60361, GR57001, Thermi Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: Environmental Impact Assessment; Life Cycle Analysis; Waste Management; Sustainability; Environmental Informatics
Dr. Sotiris Patsios
Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Research and Technology - Hellas (CERTH), Chemical Process and Energy Resources Institute (CPERI), Laboratory of Natural Resources and Renewable Energies (NRRE),6th km Charilaou-Thermi Rd, P.O. Box 60361, GR57001, Thermi Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: Water and Wastewater Treatment; Membrane Bioreactor Technology; Agro-Industrial Waste Valorisation; Membrane Processes; Water Reuse
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Konstantinos N. Kontogiannopoulos
Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, School of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: nanotechnology; natural products; drug delivery systems; pharmaceutical technology
Dr. Kleoniki Pouikli
Website
Guest Editor
ERA - Academy of European Law, Metzer Allee 4, D-54295 Trier, Germany
Interests: Environmental law and policy; sustainability law; resilience; climate change and energy law

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The need to build environmental considerations into decision-making, is no longer a bold proposition, but a basic necessity. To that end, Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) plays constantly an increasing role in environmental impact assessment corresponding to the growing need of achieving the short- as well as long-term aims of sustainable development. Either as a practical toolbox or as a conceptual framework, LCA constitutes a transparent and reliable way to assess the environmental impacts of products, systems or services from cradle to grave in order to pave the way towards sustainable development. Nowadays, the transition to sustainable lifestyles, products and services is very high on the political both internationally and at EU level. Therefore, the promotion of LCA as integral part of the environmental assessment tool-kit as well as of the policy development processes strengthens the transition to harmonized methodologies among different stakeholders, enhances the evolvement of efficient methods for impact assessment and facilitates communication and exchanges on life-cycle data.

This Special Issue aspires to present a selection of original and innovative papers highlighting the most challenging aspects relating to the comprehensive integration of the life cycle thinking in business and in policy making. Problems, challenges, perspectives and opportunities with respect to the different applications of the LCA will shed light on the dynamic and forward-looking nature of this tool especially in the light of the sustainable development goals and priorities. Successful paradigms of LCA methodology application on specific case studies are also welcomed. Papers on the aforementioned, as well as other relevant topics, selected for this Special Issue will be subject to a rigorous peer-review process with the aim of rapid and wide dissemination of research results, developments, and applications.

Dr. George Banias
Dr. Sotiris Patsios
Dr. Konstantinos Kontogiannopoulos
Dr. Kleoniki Pouikli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • environmental impact assessment
  • life cycle thinking
  • environmental considerations and decision making

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Proves that Manila Clam Farming (Ruditapes Philippinarum) is a Fully Sustainable Aquaculture Practice and a Carbon Sink
Sustainability 2020, 12(13), 5252; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12135252 - 29 Jun 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum, Adams and Reeve, 1850) farming is a quantitatively important and valuable form of aquaculture production worldwide but, to our best knowledge, no life cycle assessments (LCA) have been undertaken on it. However, being a filter feeder and [...] Read more.
Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum, Adams and Reeve, 1850) farming is a quantitatively important and valuable form of aquaculture production worldwide but, to our best knowledge, no life cycle assessments (LCA) have been undertaken on it. However, being a filter feeder and producing a thick shell during the growing cycle, the capacity of Manila clam to remove nutrients, carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous from the marine environment potentially has some positive effects on the environment. This study was performed in the Sacca di Goro lagoon, located in the southernmost part of the Po River Delta, in the northwestern Adriatic Sea. The LCA of clam farming from a cradle-to-gate perspective have been carried out, including the production stages as seed procuring, sowing, harvesting, depuration and packaging to obtain 1 ton of fresh ready-to-sell clams. The results show that area preparation, fuel combustion and plastic bags were the main contributors to the environmental impacts. The potential capability as a carbon sink of 1 ton of clams has been calculated and the effects on eutrophication reduction by fixing nitrogen and phosphorous in shells, with a net sequestration of 444.55 kg of CO2, 1.54 kg of N and 0.31 kg of P per year. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Assessment, Life Cycle Analysis and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle
Sustainability of Mussel (Mytilus Galloprovincialis) Farming in the Po River Delta, Northern Italy, Based on a Life Cycle Assessment Approach
Sustainability 2020, 12(9), 3814; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093814 - 07 May 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Molluscan shellfish aquaculture is considered a “green” industry because of the limited presence of chemicals and risk of pathogens during farming in licensed areas, which provide a safe, nutritive and healthy food source. Moreover, the environmental impact of their production is lower than [...] Read more.
Molluscan shellfish aquaculture is considered a “green” industry because of the limited presence of chemicals and risk of pathogens during farming in licensed areas, which provide a safe, nutritive and healthy food source. Moreover, the environmental impact of their production is lower than all other fish animal per unit of protein. In particular, mussels’ production was the first organized mollusk aquaculture in Europe and is now one of the most extended. Italy is the second main European producer of mussels. Taking into account the relevance of the sector, Italian Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) aquaculture has been considered for a life cycle assessment (LCA), from a cradle-to-gate perspective. The mussel farms were located in the northern Adriatic Sea, close to the Po River Delta, a region traditionally vocated to bivalve aquaculture. Results have shown that the growing and harvesting phases are the most critical life cycle stages (“hotspots”) due to the production and use of boats, and the great quantity of non-recyclable high-density polyethylene (HDPE) socks used during the yearly productive cycle. Several improvement potentials have been identified and estimated by means of a sensitivity analysis. Furthermore, regarding the principal exporting countries to Italy (Spain and Chile), the transport factors in an overall sustainability assessment have been considered, in order to compare the local and global mussels supply chain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Assessment, Life Cycle Analysis and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle
Implementation Barriers for a System of Environmental-Economic Accounting in Developing Countries and Its Implications for Monitoring Sustainable Development Goals
Sustainability 2019, 11(22), 6417; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11226417 - 14 Nov 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
The desire to include environmental information in national accounts has resulted in the construction of a system of environmental-economic accounting (SEEA). As the international statistical standard for environmental-economic accounting, the SEEA can provide valuable support for monitoring Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This study [...] Read more.
The desire to include environmental information in national accounts has resulted in the construction of a system of environmental-economic accounting (SEEA). As the international statistical standard for environmental-economic accounting, the SEEA can provide valuable support for monitoring Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This study assesses the potential use of the SEEA for monitoring SDGs. This paper shows that, in theory, the potential for this system is significant. However, based on a literature review and survey of SEEA experts, practical problems in implementing the SEEA are significant, especially in developing countries. Such issues include data availability and quality, as well as the availability of funding and human resources. Capacity development is key to establishing successful implementation of the SEEA in developing countries. For example, the World Bank’s WAVES program (Wealth Accounting and Valuation of Ecosystem Services) has been instrumental in capacity building in developing countries, which, however, still show great variation in how they implement SEEA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Assessment, Life Cycle Analysis and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle
Past Performance, Organizational Aspiration, and Organizational Performance: The Moderating Effect of Environmental Jolts
Sustainability 2019, 11(15), 4217; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11154217 - 05 Aug 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Previous research has implied that past performance and organizational aspiration may have an important effect on the sustainable growth of organizational performance. Under the conditions of environmental jolts, their relationships are more complicated to discern. However, few studies have undertaken this investigation. Using [...] Read more.
Previous research has implied that past performance and organizational aspiration may have an important effect on the sustainable growth of organizational performance. Under the conditions of environmental jolts, their relationships are more complicated to discern. However, few studies have undertaken this investigation. Using data from 183 U.S. firms, this study proposes and tests a theoretical model of the relationships between past performance, organizational aspiration, and organizational performance at different environmental jolt levels. Through hierarchical regression analysis, the empirical findings suggest that low levels of environmental jolt weaken the positive relationship between organizational aspiration and organizational performance, while high levels of environmental jolt magnify the positive influence of past performance on organizational performance. Most importantly, the empirical findings reveal that at low levels of environmental jolt, past performance has no effect on organizational performance, while organizational aspiration has no effect on organizational performance when the level of environmental jolt is high. These interesting findings provide some implications for managers and enrich the theory of sustainable development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Assessment, Life Cycle Analysis and Sustainability)
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