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Special Issue "Sustainable Art Cities and Tourist Attractions: Coping with Overtourism and Promoting Revitalisation"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Tourism, Culture, and Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2020) | Viewed by 12502

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Doug Noonan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, 800 W. Michigan St., Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA
Interests: environmental policy and sustainability; cultural economics; public policy; urban affairs
Prof. Dr. Chiara Dalle Nogare
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Economia e Management, University of Brescia, Via S. Faustino 74/b, 25122 Brescia, Italy
Interests: cultural economics; tourism economics; political economy
Prof. Dr. Monika Murzyn-Kupisz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Regional Development, Institute of Geography and Spatial Management, Jagiellonian University, 30-387 Kraków, ul. Gronostajowa 7, Poland
Interests: socio-economic geography; cultural economics; urban studies; heritage studies; artists; museums

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The sustainability of tourism, and its contribution to sustainable cities, poses challenges and opportunities.  The economics and management of tourism, cultural institutions and heritage sites, and efforts to revitalize cities can provide important insights into sustainability.  Although the term “overtourism” has gained popularity only in recent times, the potential negative externalities of over-dimensioned tourist and excursionist flows have long been investigated. The recent boom of academic contributions on the subject originates from overtourism becoming a real problem (in both urban and rural contexts), as the surge of tourismophobic movements in many European cities testify. The majority of studies focusing on overtourism have so far explored the causes of overtourism and its characterisation. The issue on how to cope with overtourism is less investigated, in spite of the fact that many destinations have by now started experimenting a number of measures and out of these experiences a recent document commissioned by the European Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism (TRAN) has extracted a first, tentative taxonomy. In particular, what has been overlooked so far is that the challenge to mitigate overtourism is not just confined to local governments, but must involve a large number of actors, in primis the institutions running the cultural and natural attractions causing the large flows of tourists and excursionists, and that coordination among all parties involved is essential.

This special issue opens the debate on new perspectives on the economics and management of tourism, especially cultural tourism, how sustainability challenges (e.g., overtourism, revitalization) have been addressed. We invite both case studies and theoretical and quantitative empirical papers covering emerging and underexplored aspects of policies by governments, cultural institutions, and other local actors aimed at coping with sustainability challenges.

Suggested topics include:

  • assessing local policies (e.g., price increases, quantity restrictions, local users vs. others), their political viability
  • timing of visitors (day-visitors, seasonality) and overtourism, including stakeholders’ well-being
  • sustainable tourism and urban design, transport, and infrastructure: congestion, carrying capacity, funding, strategic planning
  • superstar cultural institutions/natural parks: best practices
  • contributions and management of tourism to promote sustainable urban development
  • role of local authorities and institutions in improving tourism offerings to attract more desirable and sustainable tourism market segments

Scholars who consider submitting a paper to the specail issue are welcome to contact the issue editors with an abstract or a topic idea.

Prof. Dr. Doug Noonan
Prof. Dr. Chiara Dalle Nogare
Prof. Dr. Monika Murzyn-Kupisz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Economics of tourism
  • Overtourism
  • Cultural tourism
  • Urban sustainability

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Sustainable Cultural Heritage Planning and Management of Overtourism in Art Cities: Lessons from Atlas World Heritage
Sustainability 2020, 12(9), 3929; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093929 - 11 May 2020
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 4338
Abstract
In recent years, there has been an increase in international tourist arrivals worldwide. In this respect, Art Cities are among the most favorable tourist destinations, as they exhibit masterpieces of art and architecture in a cultural environment. However, the so-called phenomenon of overtourism [...] Read more.
In recent years, there has been an increase in international tourist arrivals worldwide. In this respect, Art Cities are among the most favorable tourist destinations, as they exhibit masterpieces of art and architecture in a cultural environment. However, the so-called phenomenon of overtourism has emerged as a significant threat to the residents’ quality of life, and, consequently, the sustainability of Art Cites. This research aims to develop a management toolkit that assists site managers to control tourism flows in Art Cities and World Heritage Sites and promotes the residents’ quality of life. The research methodology was developed within the framework of the Atlas Project in 2019. In this project, five European Art Cities, including Florence, Edinburgh, Bordeaux, Porto, and Santiago de Compostela, discussed their common management challenges through the shared learning method. After developing selection criteria, the Atlas’ partners suggested a total of nine strategies as best practices for managing overtourism in Art Cities in multiple sections of accommodation policies, monitoring tactics, and promotional offerings. The Atlas project was conducted before the outbreak of the COVID-19 virus pandemic. Based on the current data, it is somehow uncertain when and how tourism activities will return to normal. The analysis of the Atlas findings also highlights some neglected dimensions in the current strategies in terms of environmental concerns, climate change impacts, crisis management, and cultural development plans, which require further research to boost the heritage planning process. Full article
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Article
From Blockbuster to Neighbourhood Buster: The Effect of Films on Barcelona
Sustainability 2020, 12(6), 2290; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12062290 - 15 Mar 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1883
Abstract
In recent years, cities such as Venice, Dubrovnik, Paris and Barcelona have experienced an exponential increase in visitor numbers leading to episodes of tourismphobia by anti-tourism movements, or even the decline of the destination. Among other solutions, some destinations see film-induced tourism as [...] Read more.
In recent years, cities such as Venice, Dubrovnik, Paris and Barcelona have experienced an exponential increase in visitor numbers leading to episodes of tourismphobia by anti-tourism movements, or even the decline of the destination. Among other solutions, some destinations see film-induced tourism as a possible way of diversifying tourism supply and demand. Through the analysis of the locations of six thematic film routes in Barcelona compared to the same locations on the largest online travel review platform, TripAdvisor, it is concluded that, far from spreading out tourist flows, fiction-induced tourism in Barcelona has concentrated tourism at the main attractions of the city. Only a few exceptions of films with minor audiences lead tourists off the beaten track. Overall, this paper provides a set of recommendations, strategies and challenges for destination managers to help alleviate overtourism and to offer more sustainable tourism away from spots that attract mass tourism. Full article
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Article
Museums and Coping with Overtourism
Sustainability 2020, 12(5), 2054; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12052054 - 06 Mar 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2016
Abstract
Newer strains of tourism research are often aimed at finding out good practices for dealing with overtourism and propose a broader understanding of stakeholders of sustainable tourism development. Drawing on qualitative empirical findings from two institutions located in major tourism hubs in Poland, [...] Read more.
Newer strains of tourism research are often aimed at finding out good practices for dealing with overtourism and propose a broader understanding of stakeholders of sustainable tourism development. Drawing on qualitative empirical findings from two institutions located in major tourism hubs in Poland, the authors inquire to what extent negative impacts of overtourism can be mitigated by museums. As the findings indicate, museums provide the commercial sector with good examples of conservation and adaptation of historic buildings to contemporary functions and encourage environmentally friendly behaviors. They can contribute to the quality of heritage narration and the quality of merchandise offered to tourists. They may have an impact on community cohesion and local residents’ quality of life as well as encourage immaterial heritage practices. Lastly, museums may exert indirect impact on transformations of urban space by getting involved in strategic planning and discussions on contemporary challenges of urban development. Full article
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Article
Towards Smarter Management of Overtourism in Historic Centres Through Visitor-Flow Monitoring
Sustainability 2019, 11(24), 7254; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11247254 - 17 Dec 2019
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1903
Abstract
Historic centres are highly regarded destinations for watching and even participating in diverse and unique forms of cultural expression. Cultural tourism, according to the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), is an important and consolidated tourism sector and its strong growth is expected to continue [...] Read more.
Historic centres are highly regarded destinations for watching and even participating in diverse and unique forms of cultural expression. Cultural tourism, according to the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), is an important and consolidated tourism sector and its strong growth is expected to continue over the coming years. Tourism, the much dreamt of redeemer for historic centres, also represents one of the main threats to heritage conservation: visitors can dynamize an economy, yet the rapid growth of tourism often has negative effects on both built heritage and the lives of local inhabitants. Knowledge of occupancy levels and flows of visiting tourists is key to the efficient management of tourism; the new technologies—the Internet of Things (IoT), big data, and geographic information systems (GIS)—when combined in interconnected networks represent a qualitative leap forward, compared to traditional methods of estimating locations and flows. A methodology is described in this paper for the management of tourism flows that is designed to promote sustainable tourism in historic centres through intelligent support mechanisms. As part of the Smart Heritage City (SHCITY) project, a collection system for visitors is developed. Following data collection via monitoring equipment, the analysis of a set of quantitative indicators yields information that can then be used to analyse visitor flows; enabling city managers to make management decisions when the tourism-carrying capacity is exceeded and gives way to overtourism. Full article
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Article
Preventing Overtourism by Identifying the Determinants of Tourists’ Choice of Attractions
Sustainability 2019, 11(19), 5177; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11195177 - 21 Sep 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1788
Abstract
Popular tourism destinations based on specific attractions along with coastal and island destinations have been considered potential candidates to suffer from overtourism. In this context, in-depth knowledge of the determinants of tourists’ choices of attractions can be used to improve policies against crowding. [...] Read more.
Popular tourism destinations based on specific attractions along with coastal and island destinations have been considered potential candidates to suffer from overtourism. In this context, in-depth knowledge of the determinants of tourists’ choices of attractions can be used to improve policies against crowding. This paper analyzes why tourists decide to visit certain attractions instead of others in the context of an island destination with sustainability concerns. To do so, discrete choice models are used to determine if a set of 96 variables can explain why 11 attractions are visited on the island of Lanzarote. The results show that 86 variables are significant to explain visits to at least one of the attractions. The analysis also identifies both similarities and differences on the effects these variables have on the probability of visiting each of the 11 attractions. These results are useful to cluster attractions depending on the profile of those tourists most likely to visit them and to cluster variables regarding their effect on visiting attractions. Furthermore, the results provide useful information for public and private managers involved in evenly reallocating tourist flows in time and space to avoid the negative impacts of overtourism. Full article
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