Special Issue "Technology and Management for Sustainable Buildings and Infrastructures"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Engineering and Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Sunkuk Kim
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Architectural Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1732, Deogyeong-daero, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 17104, Korea
Interests: Construction project management; Construction information technology; Health performance evaluation of buildings, Sustainable construction management; Simulation and optimization of project management; Project risk management; Free-form building technology; Machine learning for construction management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustainability has been being used in a variety of areas, including human activities, economics and management, climate and environment, and national policy since the Roman Club first mentioned it in 1972 in the report “The Limits to Growth”. According to UNEP, buildings use about 40% of the global energy, 25% of the global water, 40% of the global resources, and they emit approximately one-third of greenhouse gas emissions. Yudelson (2007) argued that buildings produce 45% to 65% of disposed waste in landfills. Enormous resources are invested in the construction and operation of various infrastructure to run cities and industries, and energy is correspondingly used. Excessive use of energy is an immoral act that places a heavy burden on future generations.

Therefore, research on the technology and management of the entire process from design, procurement, construction, O&M, and decommissioning is needed to produce sustainable buildings and infrastructure that minimize energy use throughout their life cycle. This Special Issue aims to act as a research hub for exchanging research on innovative technology and management on sustainable buildings and infrastructure. This Special Issue is expected to contribute to the sustainability of buildings and infrastructure, which most impacts climate change. This Special Issue encourages the submission of case study papers, as well as academic and practical research, with focuses on the keywords listed below.

  • Sustainable buildings and infrastructure
  • Sustainable construction technology
  • Energy use or CO2 emission reduction
  • Life cycle assessment
  • Simulation, optimization, and risk management
  • Sustainable facility management
  • Modeling techniques for the sustainability of buildings and infrastructure
  • Policies and regulations for sustainable buildings and infrastructure

Original papers related to the above keywords or considering innovative technologies, management techniques, experimental investigations, mathematical and logical algorithms, policies and regulations, and case studies for sustainable buildings and infrastructures are also welcome.

Prof. Sunkuk Kim
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Buildings and infrastructure
  • Sustainability
  • Technology and management
  • Energy use
  • CO2 reduction
  • Life cycle assessment
  • Facility management
  • Simulation
  • Optimization
  • Risk management
  • Modeling techniques
  • Policy

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of Space Service Quality for Facilitating Efficient Operations in a Mass Rapid Transit Station
Sustainability 2020, 12(13), 5295; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12135295 - 30 Jun 2020
Abstract
In an urban public transport system, mass rapid transit (MRT) stations play an important role in the concentration and deconcentration of passengers. Spatial conflicts and unclear routes may lead to crowding in MRT stations and reduce their operational efficiency. For this reason, this [...] Read more.
In an urban public transport system, mass rapid transit (MRT) stations play an important role in the concentration and deconcentration of passengers. Spatial conflicts and unclear routes may lead to crowding in MRT stations and reduce their operational efficiency. For this reason, this study proposes a space service quality evaluation method based on agent-based simulation by employing spatial information from building information modeling (BIM) systems as boundary constraints. Moreover, passengers and trains are simulated as interacting agents with complex behaviors in a limited space. This method comprehensively assesses congestion, noise, and air quality to determine service quality in different spaces. Moreover, the results are visualized in different ways for decision making about space planning. Finally, this research demonstrates and verifies the functions of the proposed system with an actual MRT station. Such simulation results can be used as a reference for management personnel to adjust space/route plans to increase passenger satisfaction environment quality, and operational efficiency in the operation stage of an MRT station. The evaluation method establishes valid and reliable measures of service performance and passenger satisfaction as well as other performance outcomes. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Natural Hazard Influence Model of Maintenance and Repair Cost for Sustainable Accommodation Facilities
Sustainability 2020, 12(12), 4994; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12124994 - 18 Jun 2020
Abstract
To optimally maintain buildings and other built infrastructure, the costs of managing them during their entire existence—that is, lifecycle costs—must be taken into account. However, due to technological improvements, developers now build more high-rise and high-performance buildings, meaning that new approaches to estimating [...] Read more.
To optimally maintain buildings and other built infrastructure, the costs of managing them during their entire existence—that is, lifecycle costs—must be taken into account. However, due to technological improvements, developers now build more high-rise and high-performance buildings, meaning that new approaches to estimating lifecycle costs are needed. Meanwhile, an accelerating process of industrialization around the world means that global warming is also accelerating, and the damage caused by natural disasters due to climate change is increasing. However, the costs of losses related to such hazards are rarely incorporated into lifecycle-cost estimation techniques. Accordingly, this study explored the relationship between, on the one hand, some known parameters of natural disasters, such as earthquakes, high winds, and/or flooding, and on the other hand, the data on exceptional maintenance costs, represented by gross loss costs, generated by a large international hotel chain from 2007 to 2017. The regression model used revealed a correlation between heavy rain and insurance-claim payouts. This and other results can usefully inform safety and design guidelines for policymakers, both in disaster management and real estate, as well as in insurance companies Full article
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Open AccessArticle
System Dynamics Model for the Improvement Planning of School Building Conditions
Sustainability 2020, 12(10), 4235; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12104235 - 21 May 2020
Abstract
As the number of aged infrastructures increases every year, a systematic and effective asset management strategy is required. One of the most common analysis methods for preparing an asset management strategy is life cycle cost analysis (LCCA). Most LCCA-related studies have focused on [...] Read more.
As the number of aged infrastructures increases every year, a systematic and effective asset management strategy is required. One of the most common analysis methods for preparing an asset management strategy is life cycle cost analysis (LCCA). Most LCCA-related studies have focused on traffic and energy; however, few studies have focused on school buildings. Therefore, an approach should be developed to increase the investment efficiency for the performance improvement of school buildings. Planning and securing budgets for the performance improvement of school building is a complex task that involves various factors, such as current conditions, deterioration behavior and maintenance effect. Therefore, this study proposes a system dynamics (SD) model for the performance improvement of school buildings by using the SD method. In this study, an SD model is used to support efficient decision-making through policy effect analysis, from a macro-perspective, for the performance improvement of school buildings. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Sustainable Application of Hybrid Point Cloud and BIM Method for Tracking Construction Progress
Sustainability 2020, 12(10), 4106; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12104106 - 18 May 2020
Abstract
Compared to the past, the complexity of construction-project progress has increased as the size of structures has become larger and taller. This has resulted in many unexpected problems with an increasing frequency of occurrence, such as various uncertainties and risk factors. Recently, research [...] Read more.
Compared to the past, the complexity of construction-project progress has increased as the size of structures has become larger and taller. This has resulted in many unexpected problems with an increasing frequency of occurrence, such as various uncertainties and risk factors. Recently, research was conducted to solve the problem via integration with data-collection automation tools of construction-project-progress measurement. Most of the methods used spatial sensing technology. Thus, this study performed a review of the representative technologies applied to construction-project-progress data collection and identified the unique characteristics of each technology. The basic principle of the progress proposed in this study is its execution through the point cloud and the attributes of BIM, which were studied in five stages: (1) Acquisition of construction completion data using a point cloud, (2) production of a completed 3D model, (3) interworking of an as-planned BIM model and as-built model, (4) construction progress tracking via overlap of two 3D models, and (5) verification by comparison with actual data. This has confirmed that the technical limitations of the construction progress tracking through the point cloud do not exist, and that a fairly high degree of progress data which contains efficiency and accuracy can be collected. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
A Simple and Sustainable Prediction Method of Liquefaction-Induced Settlement at Pohang Using an Artificial Neural Network
Sustainability 2020, 12(10), 4001; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12104001 - 13 May 2020
Abstract
Conventionally, liquefaction-induced settlements have been predicted through numerical or analytical methods. In this study, a machine learning approach for predicting the liquefaction-induced settlement at Pohang was investigated. In particular, we examined the potential of an artificial neural network (ANN) algorithm to predict the [...] Read more.
Conventionally, liquefaction-induced settlements have been predicted through numerical or analytical methods. In this study, a machine learning approach for predicting the liquefaction-induced settlement at Pohang was investigated. In particular, we examined the potential of an artificial neural network (ANN) algorithm to predict the earthquake-induced settlement at Pohang on the basis of standard penetration test (SPT) data. The performance of two ANN models for settlement prediction was studied and compared in terms of the R2 correlation. Model 1 (input parameters: unit weight, corrected SPT blow count, and cyclic stress ratio (CSR)) showed higher prediction accuracy than model 2 (input parameters: depth of the soil layer, corrected SPT blow count, and the CSR), and the difference in the R2 correlation between the models was about 0.12. Subsequently, an optimal ANN model was used to develop a simple predictive model equation, which was implemented using a matrix formulation. Finally, the liquefaction-induced settlement chart based on the predictive model equation was proposed, and the applicability of the chart was verified by comparing it with the interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) image. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Analysis of Deformation Characteristics of Foundation-Pit Excavation and Circular Wall
Sustainability 2020, 12(8), 3164; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083164 - 14 Apr 2020
Abstract
The surrounding ground settlement and displacement control of an underground diaphragm wall during the excavation of a foundation pit are the main challenges for engineering safety. These factors are also an obstacle to the controllable and sustainable development of foundation-pit projects. In this [...] Read more.
The surrounding ground settlement and displacement control of an underground diaphragm wall during the excavation of a foundation pit are the main challenges for engineering safety. These factors are also an obstacle to the controllable and sustainable development of foundation-pit projects. In this study, monitoring data were analyzed to identify the deformation law and other characteristics of the support structure. A three-dimensional numerical simulation of the foundation-pit excavation process was performed in Midas/GTS NX. To overcome the theoretical shortcomings of parameter selection for finite-element simulation, a key data self-verification method was used. Results showed that the settlement of the surface surrounding the circular underground continuous wall was mainly affected by the depth of the foundation-pit excavation. In addition, wall deformation for each working condition showed linearity with clear staged characteristics. In particular, the deformation curve had obvious inflection points, most of which were located deeper than 2/3 of the overall excavation depth. The characteristics of the cantilever pile were not obvious in Working Conditions 3–9, but the distribution of the wall body offset in a D-shaped curve was evident. Deviation between the monitoring value of the maximal wall offset and the simulated value was only 4.31 %. The appropriate physical and mechanical parameters for key data self-verification were proposed. The concept of the circular-wall offset inflection point is proposed to determine the distribution of inflection-point positions and offset curves. The method provides new opportunities for the safety control and sustainable research of foundation-pit excavations. Full article
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Open AccessTechnical Note
Inter-Floor Noise Monitoring System for Multi-Dwelling Houses Using Smartphones
Sustainability 2020, 12(12), 5065; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12125065 - 22 Jun 2020
Abstract
The noise between the floors in apartment buildings is becoming a social problem, and the number of disputes related to it are increasing every year. However, laypersons will find it difficult to use the sound level meters because they are expensive, delicate, bulky, [...] Read more.
The noise between the floors in apartment buildings is becoming a social problem, and the number of disputes related to it are increasing every year. However, laypersons will find it difficult to use the sound level meters because they are expensive, delicate, bulky, etc. Therefore, this study proposes a system to monitor the noise between the floors, that will measure the sound and estimate the location of the noise using the sensors and applications in smartphones. To evaluate how this system can be used effectively within an apartment building, a case study has been performed to verify its validity. The result shows that the mean absolute error (MAE) between the actual noise generating position and the estimated noise source location was measured at 2.8 m, with a minimum error of 1.2 m and a maximum error of 4.3 m. This means that smartphones, in the future, can be used as low-cost monitoring and evaluation devices to measure the noise between the floors in apartment buildings. Full article
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Open AccessTechnical Note
Development and Application of Precast Concrete Double Wall System to Improve Productivity of Retaining Wall Construction
Sustainability 2020, 12(8), 3454; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083454 - 23 Apr 2020
Abstract
The construction of most apartment underground parking lots utilizes reinforced concrete (RC) structures composed mainly of rebar work and formwork. RC structures lower construction efficiency and significantly delay the construction because they require a large number of temporary materials and wooden formwork. In [...] Read more.
The construction of most apartment underground parking lots utilizes reinforced concrete (RC) structures composed mainly of rebar work and formwork. RC structures lower construction efficiency and significantly delay the construction because they require a large number of temporary materials and wooden formwork. In this study, a precast concrete double wall (PCDW) system was developed to address the existing problems of RC structures and to improve the productivity of retaining wall construction. PCDW is a precast concrete (PC) wall in which two thin concrete panels are connected parallel to each other with truss-shaped reinforcement between them. PCDW can contribute to securing integrity, reducing the delay in construction, and improving quality. An overall process for the member design and construction stage of the PCDW system was proposed, and its improvement effects were examined regarding various aspects in comparison to the RC method. Full article
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