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Sustainable Food Processing and Preservation

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Food".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 September 2023) | Viewed by 10523

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Food Science, Tunghai University, Taichung City 407, Taiwan
Interests: food processing; 3D food printing; edible film; electrospun nanofibers
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science, Tunghai University, Taichung City 407, Taiwan
Interests: food process engineering; atmospheric pressure plasma; plant based meat production; food control

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Foods are daily necessities of mankind. In the long history of humans, food processing and preservation (drying, pickling, fermentation, etc.) have been used to enhance the value of foods and to prolong their storage period and shelf life. However, along with the improvements to these technologies with time, these methods have developed into more modern and advanced technologies in the food industry. The sustainable development of food processing and preservation are important in the food industry; they improve not only the functions but also the quality of foods to fulfill the current health expectations of customers. Besides, in the current big data revolution, data analysis is related to food production, and a few relevant technologies are emerging (e.g., 3D food printing and AI image recognition for food). Thus, this Special Issue aims to collect original research articles and reviews on sustainable food processing and preservation including cold atmospheric plasma, electric field, radiofrequency, micro-bubble, nano-bubble, sterilization, packaging film, edible film, biological coating film, 3D food printing, and AI image recognition. Related topics with applications and future developments are also welcome for submission.

Dr. Jhih-Ying Ciou
Prof. Dr. Chuan-Liang Hsu
Dr. Chih-Yao Hou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cold atmospheric plasma
  • electric field
  • radiofrequency
  • micro-bubble
  • nano-bubble
  • sterilization
  • packaging film
  • edible film
  • biological coating film
  • 3D food printing
  • AI image recognition

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 9079 KiB  
Article
Development of Biodegradable Alginate-Based Films with Bioactive Properties and Optimal Structural Characteristics with Incorporation of Protein Hydrolysates
by Oksana Zinina, Svetlana Merenkova and Damir Galimov
Sustainability 2023, 15(20), 15086; https://doi.org/10.3390/su152015086 - 20 Oct 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1762
Abstract
Alginate is widely used in the food industry due to its biodegradability, biocompatibility, and non-toxicity. Protein hydrolysates possess properties important for forming the mechanical characteristics, protective, and barrier properties of the films. The aim of the research was to develop biodegradable alginate-based films [...] Read more.
Alginate is widely used in the food industry due to its biodegradability, biocompatibility, and non-toxicity. Protein hydrolysates possess properties important for forming the mechanical characteristics, protective, and barrier properties of the films. The aim of the research was to develop biodegradable alginate-based films with bioactive properties and the optimal structural characteristics when protein hydrolysates were incorporated. The microstructure of the cross-sections of films with 0.5 and 1.0% protein hydrolysates was characterized by smoother and homogeneous surfaces, which indicated the compatibility of sodium alginate and protein hydrolysate. The addition of protein hydrolysate significantly increased the thickness of the film by 0.06 mm and reduced the solubility by 49.4% (p < 0.05). The results showed the high biodegradability of alginate-based films after 2 weeks of storage. With the introduction of protein hydrolysate, changes occurred in the FTIR patterns due to the interaction between the hydroxyl groups of peptides and the alginate, and, consequently, the thermal stability of the alginate films increased. The alginate films with PH positively affected the storage capacity of sweet cherry berries, both at room temperature and under refrigeration conditions. The alginate-based films with protein hydrolysate have improved properties and can serve as an alternative to polypropylene packaging materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Food Processing and Preservation)
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12 pages, 908 KiB  
Article
Effect of Supplementation of Freshly Pressed Carrot Juice with Rhus coriaria L. on Changes in Juice Quality
by Emilia Osmólska, Monika Stoma, Agnieszka Sagan, Barbara Chudzik and Agnieszka Starek-Wójcicka
Sustainability 2023, 15(1), 719; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15010719 - 31 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2152
Abstract
The creation of an environmentally friendly food system involves, e.g., the production of safe and healthy food and the reduction of its waste. Therefore, the main aim of this research was to determine the effect of the addition of ground sumac powder (in [...] Read more.
The creation of an environmentally friendly food system involves, e.g., the production of safe and healthy food and the reduction of its waste. Therefore, the main aim of this research was to determine the effect of the addition of ground sumac powder (in the amount of 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 g/100 mL) on the physicochemical properties of freshly pressed carrot (Daucus carota L.) juice and to obtain a product with extended shelf life. The analyses revealed the multiplication of microorganisms in the control juice samples during storage and the inhibition of the multiplication in the sumac-enriched samples. After 72 h, the addition of sumac in the amount of 0.5, 1.5, and 3 g reduced the total number of microorganisms by 1.7, 2.9, and 3.1 log10 CFU/g, respectively, compared to the control. The supplementation of carrot juice with sumac in the amount of 3% increased the content of carotenoids and polyphenolic compounds on the first day of storage by 23% and 40%, respectively, compared to the control sample. The addition of sumac to the carrot juice extended the shelf life of the product with a simultaneous significant increase in polyphenols classified as health-promoting substances. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Food Processing and Preservation)
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12 pages, 7047 KiB  
Article
Printing Parameters of Sugar/Pectin Jelly Candy and Application by Using a Decision Tree in a Hot-Extrusion 3D Printing System
by Jeremiah Hao Ran Huang, Chan-Yang Wu, Hsiu-Mei Chan and Jhih-Ying Ciou
Sustainability 2022, 14(18), 11618; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141811618 - 16 Sep 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1926
Abstract
This study aims to obtain a desirable 3D printing product based on the knowledge of the material and suitable printing parameters. This study used high-methoxy pectin (HMP) as the ingredient of pectin jelly candy to understand the effect of different pectin concentrations and [...] Read more.
This study aims to obtain a desirable 3D printing product based on the knowledge of the material and suitable printing parameters. This study used high-methoxy pectin (HMP) as the ingredient of pectin jelly candy to understand the effect of different pectin concentrations and printing parameters (nozzle height, extrusion rate, printing layer height, nozzle movement speed, and nozzle diameter). Machine learning was used to learn and analyze the data of different 3D printing parameters to find out a suitable parameter. Rheological analysis revealed that a 16% pectin (w/v) concentration had the height of G′ and G″, and all pectin jelly candy showed the characteristic of shearing thinning. A parameter analysis decision tree revealed that the pectin concentration of 12–14% (w/v), printing layer height below 1.5 mm, extrusion rate below 0.305 mm3/s, nozzle height above 0.5 mm, and printing rate of 5–10 mm were able to allow pectin jelly candy to be printed with an error below 5%. Machine learning helps researchers find appropriate parameters and reach the design of molding height quickly, and it helps them discuss how molecule interaction causes different 3D printing results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Food Processing and Preservation)
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9 pages, 619 KiB  
Article
Use of Incinerated Eggshells to Produce Pidan
by Chia-Min Lin, Chih-Yao Hou, Ming-Kuei Shih, Chang-Wei Hsieh, Yu-Lin Hung and Ping-Hsiu Huang
Sustainability 2022, 14(11), 6797; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14116797 - 1 Jun 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1715
Abstract
Preserved eggs (pidans) are used in traditional Chinese cuisines. However, the alkaline conditions and metal ions generated during its preparation have caused some concerns. This study developed an innovative process for pidan processing using incinerated eggshell powder, an abundant by-product that can generate [...] Read more.
Preserved eggs (pidans) are used in traditional Chinese cuisines. However, the alkaline conditions and metal ions generated during its preparation have caused some concerns. This study developed an innovative process for pidan processing using incinerated eggshell powder, an abundant by-product that can generate a highly alkaline solution and provide calcium ions (Ca2+). Either 0.5, 3, or 5% of the eggshell powder solution was used for basic pickling. Different combinations of ZnSO4 (0.175%), MgCl2 (0.08%), and CuSO4 (0.16%) were added. Duck eggs were pickled for 25 days at 25–27 °C, followed by 14 days of ripening. The pidan processed in 5% eggshell powder containing 0.175% ZnSO4 demonstrated the closest physiochemical and sensory characteristics to commercial pidans. Thus, the results offer a new technique to manufacture pidans and reduce the harmful impact of metal ions on human health and the environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Food Processing and Preservation)
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11 pages, 1468 KiB  
Article
Antibacterial Efficacy and Physiochemical Effects of Ozone Microbubble Water on Tomato
by Chih-Yao Hou, Yun-Ru Chen, Jong-Shinn Wu, Hsiu-Ling Chen, Chun-Ping Hsiao, Chih-Tung Liu and Chia-Min Lin
Sustainability 2022, 14(11), 6549; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14116549 - 27 May 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2049
Abstract
The consumption of fresh produce is steadily increasing and chlorine washing is the most commonly used method of disinfecting fresh produce. However, chlorine washing possesses a potential risk. Hence, this study used ozone microbubble (OMB) water to disinfect Salmonella Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, [...] Read more.
The consumption of fresh produce is steadily increasing and chlorine washing is the most commonly used method of disinfecting fresh produce. However, chlorine washing possesses a potential risk. Hence, this study used ozone microbubble (OMB) water to disinfect Salmonella Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli on tomatoes. After injecting ozone into the microbubble generator, OMB was fulfilled in a 10 L tank for 10 or 20 min. The inoculated tomatoes were washed for 30 or 60 s. Control groups included unwashed, water-washed, microbubble-only, and ozone-only. The microbial populations were significantly lower on the OMB-treated tomatoes than controls (p < 0.05), but not between various fulfilling or treatment time (p > 0.05). When tomatoes were treated with OMB with 10 min fulfilling and 30-s washing, the differences of tested bacteria and water washing, ozone-only, and microbubble-only were: S. Enteritidis: 4.11, 3.37, 2.54 log CFU/tomato; S. Typhimurium: 4.83, 4.50, 2.78 log CFU/tomato; E. coli: 4.31, 4.08, 2.09 log CFU/tomato; S. aureus: 4.12, 3.93, 2.82 log CFU/tomato. In addition, significant higher ozone concentrations and conductivity were detected in OMB water than other groups (p < 0.05). Color, texture, and sensory characteristics of the OMB-treated tomatoes were not significantly different from other groups (p > 0.05). This study demonstrated that OMB effectively inactivated bacteria on tomatoes and did not affect the physical and sensory characteristics of tomatoes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Food Processing and Preservation)
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