Special Issue "Social Polarization, Inequality and Segregation"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jose Balsa-Barreiro
Website
Guest Editor
MIT Media Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 75 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA 02139, United States
Interests: segregation; social polarization; inequalities; mapping; urban planning; conflicts; geography; sociology; economy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, it is observed a global tendency towards the concentration of wealth in fewer hands and, consequently, the increase of social inequalities. This is due to many factors related to race, genre, housing community, and/or geographic space -in addition to other factors that must be evaluated-. Consequently, social fragmentation and isolation of certain groups are increasingly tearing them apart.

It is evident in urban areas where people with extreme wealth and social power are interspersed with places of deprivation, exclusion, and economic decline. The concentration of segregated realities explains the emergence of some dynamics associated with the precariousness of the labor force, patterns of violence, intolerance, among others. Some recent studies show how these spatial patterns are being replicated in the digital world. Thus, the interaction patterns, interests, contents, etc. on social networks are completely different for poor and rich people.

This Special Issue will comprise a selection of papers presenting original and innovative contributions to the study of social polarization, inequalities and segregation by adopting any scientific focus in areas related to natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. It presents a particular interest in those studies that relate their perspectives of sustainability and/or sustainable development, according to the main interest of this journal. Papers selected for this Special Issue will be subject to a rigorous peer-review process for a fast and wide dissemination of research results, developments, and applications.

Dr. Jose Balsa-Barreiro
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • spatial segregation
  • income inequalities
  • fragmented societies
  • social polarization
  • collective behavior
  • urban patterns
  • human dynamics
  • policies for reducing inequalities
  • future cities
  • politics

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Ethnolinguistic Diversity and Education. A Successful Pairing
Sustainability 2019, 11(23), 6625; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236625 - 23 Nov 2019
Abstract
The many growing migratory flows render our societies increasingly heterogeneous. From the point of view of social welfare, achieving all the positive effects of diversity appears as a challenge for our societies. Nevertheless, while it is true that ethnolinguistic diversity involves costs and [...] Read more.
The many growing migratory flows render our societies increasingly heterogeneous. From the point of view of social welfare, achieving all the positive effects of diversity appears as a challenge for our societies. Nevertheless, while it is true that ethnolinguistic diversity involves costs and benefits, at a country level it seems that the former are greater than the latter, even more so when income inequality between ethnic groups is taken into account. In this respect, there is a vast literature at a macro level that shows that ethnolinguistic fragmentation induces lower income, which leads to the conclusion that part of the difference in income observed between countries can be attributed to their different levels of fragmentation. This paper presents primary evidence of the role of education in mitigating the adverse effects of ethnolinguistic fractionalization on the level of income. While the results show a negative association between fragmentation and income for all indices of diversity, the attainment of a certain level of education, especially secondary and tertiary, manages to reverse the sign of the marginal effect of ethnolinguistic fractionalization on income level. Since current societies are increasingly diverse, these results could have major economic policy implications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Polarization, Inequality and Segregation)
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