sustainability-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Landscape Planning for Sustainability

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Urban and Rural Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2021) | Viewed by 23315

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sustainable Resources Management, State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA
Interests: environmental and sustainability indicators; sustainable development; global change; landscape ecology; landscape planning; ecological restoration; resilience
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

“Making progress towards sustainability is like going to a destination we have never visited before, equipped with a sense of geography and the principles of navigation, but without a map or compass” (Hales & Prescott-Allen, 2002: 6). Undoubtedly, further understanding of how humanity manages and lives within landscapes is paramount to reaching destination sustainability. Therefore, this Special Issue of Sustainability aims to report the current state of landscape planning in regards to designing, planning, restoring, modeling, and evaluating natural and human-dominated landscapes. From the foundational works of the great ‘seers’ Ebenezer Howard, Fredrick Law Olmsted, Frank Lloyd Wright, Ian McHarg, Jane Jacobs, and Le Corbusier to their modern counterparts Marina Alberti, Jack Ahern, Richard T.T. Forman, Andre Botequilha Leitão, Kevin McGarigal, Monica Turner, and Jianguo Wu, it is imperative to showcase the current state of the art of landscape planning.

This Special Issue welcomes theoretical discussions, applied international case studies, review articles, management practice, and policy papers that connect landscape planning with the themes of resilience, sustainable development, and sustainability. Submissions dealing with the following areas are specifically of interest:

  • Best practices for the inclusion of stakeholders and marginalized populations in landscape planning.
  • New tools and technological advances in the practice of landscape planning.
  • The role of landscape planning in ecological restoration, building resilience, and addressing global change.
  • Landscape planning perspectives, methods, and designs for urban renewal and creating sustainable cities.
  • Policy and theoretical frameworks connecting sustainable development and resilience goals with landscape planning across scales.
  • Landscape planning research gaps and future perspectives.

Dr. Richard Ross Shaker
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Landscape planning
  • Landscape ecology
  • Landscape design
  • Landscape architecture
  • Urbanization
  • Ecological restoration
  • Environmental planning
  • Environmental management
  • Global change
  • Resilience
  • Urban resilience
  • Sustainable development
  • Sustainability
  • Spatial analysis

Published Papers (7 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

16 pages, 4180 KiB  
Article
Impacts of Urban Land Use Changes on Ecosystem Services in Dianchi Lake Basin, China
by Ruibo Wang, Xiaojun Xu, Yang Bai, Juha M. Alatalo, Zongbao Yang, Wei Yang and Zhangqian Yang
Sustainability 2021, 13(9), 4813; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13094813 - 25 Apr 2021
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 2714
Abstract
Land use change is widely regarded as a key factor altering the structure and function of ecosystems. Urbanization is a particular driver and influence in land use change and is expanding globally, especially in developing countries like China. The InVEST model was employed [...] Read more.
Land use change is widely regarded as a key factor altering the structure and function of ecosystems. Urbanization is a particular driver and influence in land use change and is expanding globally, especially in developing countries like China. The InVEST model was employed in this study to comprehensively assess the temporal-spatial impacts of urban land use changes (ULUC) on ecosystem services (ESs) and clarify the tradeoffs between urbanization and ecosystem services provision (ESP) in Dianchi Lake Basin (DLB), China, during 1995–2015. The results showed that DLB’s constructed land, particularly in lakeside areas, has increased substantially because of rapid urbanization (built-up area increase 51%, urbanization rate increase 91%), at the expense of agriculture, grassland, and scrubland, greatly altering ESP. Compared with 1995, carbon storage in 2015 decreased, while soil retention and nitrogen exports only fluctuated slightly. Although water yield increased, the ecological water volume of the whole DLB decreased through an increase in regional surface runoff. This resulted in more pollutants being carried into Dianchi Lake, impairing water quality and causing serious ecological and environmental issues. Thus, this study provides empirical evidence of the significant influence of ULUC on ESP. For eco-friendly urbanization in DLB and similar areas with rapid urbanization, a sustainable pattern of urbanization should be followed. The best tradeoffs between urbanization and ESP should be identified and considered in decision-making relating to urban planning, land use management, optimal natural resources management, and ecological conservation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscape Planning for Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 1755 KiB  
Article
Predicting Bicycle-on-Board Transit Choice in a University Environment
by Greg Rybarczyk and Richard R. Shaker
Sustainability 2021, 13(2), 512; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13020512 - 7 Jan 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2191
Abstract
Bicycles-on-board (BoB) transit is a popular travel demand management (TDM) tool across many U.S. cities and universities, yet research on this mode within a university environment remains minimal. The purpose of this research is to investigate how personal and neighborhood factors influence this [...] Read more.
Bicycles-on-board (BoB) transit is a popular travel demand management (TDM) tool across many U.S. cities and universities, yet research on this mode within a university environment remains minimal. The purpose of this research is to investigate how personal and neighborhood factors influence this travel choice in a university setting. Relying on attitudinal data from a stated preference survey, this study examined the effect of personal characteristics and seven key neighborhood conditions on the willingness to utilize BoB for the “first mile” of the journey to campus. The study used exploratory spatial data analysis (ESDA), a discrete choice modeling framework, and geovisualizations to understand the likelihood of choosing this mode among a university population in Flint, Michigan, USA. The results revealed that the majority of constituents were not interested in BoB, aside from a cluster near the commercial business district. Also of note was that long commutes, and reduced access to parks and bicycle facilities dissuaded people from choosing this mode. Surprisingly, a neighborhood’s walkability or bikeability had no effect on respondent’s interest in using BoB. Lastly, the geovisualizations showcased where localized interventions may effectively increase this mode choice in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscape Planning for Sustainability)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

25 pages, 3566 KiB  
Article
Integration of Ecosystem Services in Strategic Environmental Assessment of a Peri-Urban Development Plan
by Teodoro Semeraro, Benedetta Radicchio, Pietro Medagli, Stefano Arzeni, Alessio Turco and Davide Geneletti
Sustainability 2021, 13(1), 122; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13010122 - 24 Dec 2020
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 3686
Abstract
Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) can support decision-makers in constructing more sustainable plans, programs, and policies (PPPs). To be more coherent with new frontiers of sustainable cities, PPPs need to include conservation objectives and to increase ecosystem service (ES) strategies. The ES concept is [...] Read more.
Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) can support decision-makers in constructing more sustainable plans, programs, and policies (PPPs). To be more coherent with new frontiers of sustainable cities, PPPs need to include conservation objectives and to increase ecosystem service (ES) strategies. The ES concept is not intrinsic to the SEA process; therefore, it is necessary to develop an approach and methodology to include it. In this paper, we propose a methodology to integrate the concept of ecosystem services in all phases of the SEA process for a sub-urban plan, including the design of mitigation measures. The case study is represented by a peri-urban development plan in the municipality of Gallipoli in South Italy, characterized by a strong tourism economy and valuable agro-ecosystems. The analysis shows the priority ecosystem services that are selected considering the sustainable development and environmental goals, the context of referment, and the aims of the peri-urban plan. After, we highlight the potential ecosystem services developed considering the design of mitigation actions like green infrastructure, which could be implemented in the peri-urban plan. The capacity to develop green infrastructure in SEA processes can configure the SEA as a tool for ecological urban design that is integrated with urban planning. This requires the ability to transfer ecological and planning theories into practical actions and the capacity of different disciplines to work in a transdisciplinary approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscape Planning for Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

21 pages, 4063 KiB  
Article
A multi-Criteria Wetland Suitability Index for Restoration across Ontario’s Mixedwood Plains
by Sally J. Medland, Richard R. Shaker, K. Wayne Forsythe, Brian R. Mackay and Greg Rybarczyk
Sustainability 2020, 12(23), 9953; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12239953 - 28 Nov 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3934
Abstract
Significant wetland loss (~72%; 1.4 million hectares) in the Province of Ontario, Canada, has resulted in damage to important ecosystem services that mitigate the effects of global change. In response, major agencies have set goals to halt this loss and work to restore [...] Read more.
Significant wetland loss (~72%; 1.4 million hectares) in the Province of Ontario, Canada, has resulted in damage to important ecosystem services that mitigate the effects of global change. In response, major agencies have set goals to halt this loss and work to restore wetlands to varying degrees of function and area. To aid those agencies, this study was guided by four research questions: (i) Which physical and ecological landscape criteria represent high suitability for wetland reconstruction? (ii) Of common wetland suitability metrics, which are most important? (iii) Can a multi-criteria wetland suitability index (WSI) effectively locate high and low wetland suitability across the Ontario Mixedwood Plains Ecozone? (iv) How do best sites from the WSI compare and contrast to both inventories of presettlement wetlands and current existing wetlands? The WSI was created based on seven criteria, normalized from 0 (low suitability) to 10 (high suitability), and illustrated through a weighted composite raster. Using an Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) and importance determined from a scoping review of relevant literature, soil drainage had the greatest meaning and weight within the WSI (48.2%). The Getis-Ord Gi* index charted statistically significant “hot spots” and “cold spots” of wetland suitability. Last, the overlay analysis revealed greater similarity between high suitability sites and presettlement wetlands supporting the severity of historic wetland cannibalization. In sum, this transferable modeling approach to regional wetland restoration provides a prioritization tool for improving ecological connectivity, services, and resilience. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscape Planning for Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 4845 KiB  
Article
Drainage Ditch Berm Delineation Using Lidar Data: A Case Study of Waseca County, Minnesota
by Jonathan Graves, Rama Mohapatra and Nicholas Flatgard
Sustainability 2020, 12(22), 9600; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229600 - 18 Nov 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2260
Abstract
Within a drainage system, drainage ditches are designed to improve existing natural drainage. Although drainage ditches are mostly engineered, they can also be part of natural watercourses. For environmental sustainability, in many places there are guidelines to establish vegetative buffer strips along the [...] Read more.
Within a drainage system, drainage ditches are designed to improve existing natural drainage. Although drainage ditches are mostly engineered, they can also be part of natural watercourses. For environmental sustainability, in many places there are guidelines to establish vegetative buffer strips along the boundary of drainage ditches. In this landscape planning study, a geospatial modeling framework was established to identify these drainage system landforms and the boundary that separates these landforms from their surrounding areas across Waseca County in south-central Minnesota. By employing almost 2000 GPS spot elevation measurements from five ditch systems and one-meter Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) derived digital elevation model (DEM) data, the drainage ditch berm polygons were delineated. Eight low light angle hillshade rasters at 45-degree azimuth intervals were used to construct the model. These hillshade rasters were combined to form a composite raster so that the effect of multiple azimuths can be captured during ditch berm delineation. The GPS points identified as the top of the berm were used to extract cell values from the combined hillshade. These cell values were modeled further using statistical distribution graphs. The statistical model derived +0.5 and +1 standard deviation values (cell values 812 and 827, respectively) of the combined hillshade raster were utilized to obtain complete berm polygons. In this semi-automated method, between 67.30% to 79.80% of ditch berm lengths were mapped with an average error that is less than the resolution of the DEM. Demarcation of these boundaries are important for local governments in Minnesota and throughout the world, as it could help guide land–water management and aid sustainable agriculture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscape Planning for Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

23 pages, 7928 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Geomorphosites for Geotourism in the Northern Part of the “Ruta Escondida” (Quito, Ecuador)
by Paúl Carrión-Mero, Alicia Ayala-Granda, Sthefano Serrano-Ayala, Fernando Morante-Carballo, Maribel Aguilar-Aguilar, Miguel Gurumendi-Noriega, Nataly Paz-Salas, Gricelda Herrera-Franco and Edgar Berrezueta
Sustainability 2020, 12(20), 8468; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12208468 - 14 Oct 2020
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 3563
Abstract
The relevant geomorphological characteristics of territory represent an essential part of its natural heritage. They are also an asset to be exploited for stimulating socio-economic development. The “Ruta Escondida” in Ecuador constitutes a historical place full of culture and landscapes that have been [...] Read more.
The relevant geomorphological characteristics of territory represent an essential part of its natural heritage. They are also an asset to be exploited for stimulating socio-economic development. The “Ruta Escondida” in Ecuador constitutes a historical place full of culture and landscapes that have been shaped over time by geological and geomorphological processes. Among the geomorphological features of the study area, volcanic cones, hilltops, terraces, foothills and glacial valleys stand out. The aims of this work were: (1) to characterize 18 places of geomorphological interest, located in the northern part of the Ruta Escondida and (2) to propose alternatives (geotourism) to contribute to the local development of the area. The applied methodology included: (1) the compilation of geomorphological elements; (2) the assessment of geomorphosites using the Inventario Español de Lugares de Interés Geológico (IELIG) method and (3) a strengths–opportunities–weaknesses–threats analysis of the contribution and influence of geomorphosites in the development of the study area. With this work, it was possible to determine that all the analyzed geomorphological sites have a high and very high interest. The strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis revealed that the geomorphosites could provide significant added value to the development of geotourism on the route, complementing the already known cultural and historical attractions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscape Planning for Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

20 pages, 5029 KiB  
Article
Hydrological Effects of Urban Green Space on Stormwater Runoff Reduction in Luohe, China
by Peihao Song, Jianhui Guo, Enkai Xu, Audrey L. Mayer, Chang Liu, Jing Huang, Guohang Tian and Gunwoo Kim
Sustainability 2020, 12(16), 6599; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166599 - 14 Aug 2020
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 3934
Abstract
This paper reveals the role of urban green space (UGS) in regulating runoff and hence on urban hydrological balance. The modeling software i-Tree Hydro was used to quantify the effects of UGS on surface runoff regulation and canopy interception capacity in four simulated [...] Read more.
This paper reveals the role of urban green space (UGS) in regulating runoff and hence on urban hydrological balance. The modeling software i-Tree Hydro was used to quantify the effects of UGS on surface runoff regulation and canopy interception capacity in four simulated land-cover scenarios. The results showed that the existing UGS could mitigate 15,871,900 m3 volume of runoff (accounting for 9.85% of total runoff) and intercept approximately 9.69% of total rainfall by the vegetation canopy. UGS in midterm goal and final goal scenarios could retain about 10.74% and 10.89% of total rainfall that falls onto the canopy layer, respectively. The existing UGS in the Luohe urban area had a positive but limited contribution in runoff regulation, with similar responses in future scenarios with increased UGS coverage. UGS rainfall interception volume changed seasonally along with changing leaf area index (LAI) and precipitation, and the interception efficiency was distinctly different under various rain intensities and durations. The UGS had a relatively high interception performance under light and long duration rain events but performed poorly under heavy and short rain events due to limited surface storage capacities. Our study will assist urban planners and policy-makers regarding UGS size and functionality in future planning in Luohe, particularly regarding future runoff management and Sponge City projects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscape Planning for Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop