Special Issue "Sustainable Structural Design for High-Performance Buildings and Infrastructures"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Chiara Bedon
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
University of Trieste, Department of Engineering and Architecture, Italy
Interests: structural engineering; materials; design; numerical analysis; experimental testing
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Mislav Stepinac
Website
Guest Editor
University of Zagreb, Croatia
Dr. Marco Fasan
Website
Guest Editor
University of Trieste, Italy
Dr. Ajitanshu Vedrtnam
Website
Guest Editor
Invertis University, India
Prof. Maged A. Youssef
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
Interests: structural fire engineering; earthquake engineering; smart materials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Exceptional design loads on buildings and structures may have different causes, including high-strain natural hazards, man-made attacks, and accidents, as well as extreme operational conditions (severe temperature variations, humidity, etc.). All of these aspects can be critical for specific structural typologies and/or materials that are particularly sensitive to external conditions. In this regard, dedicated and refined methods are required for their design, analysis, and maintenance under the expected lifetime. Major challenges are related to the structural typology and material properties, with respect to the key features of the imposed design load. Further issues can be derived from the need for the mitigation or retrofit of existing structures, as well as from the optimal and safe design of innovative materials/systems. Finally, in some cases, no appropriate design recommendations are available, and thus, experimental investigations can have a key role within the overall process.

In this Special Issue, we want to focus on recent advancements and trends for sustainable design of high-performance buildings and structures.

Special attention will thus be given to new materials and systems, but also to buildings and infrastructures that can be subjected to extreme design loads during their lifetime. This can be the case of exceptional natural events (earthquakes, fire, floods, hurricanes, tsunamis), or unfavorable ambient conditions. The assessment of hazard and risk (seismic, tsunami, scour, etc.), associated with structures and civil infrastructure systems, is important for the preservation and protection of the built environment. New procedures, methods, and more precise rules for the safety design and protection of sustainable structures and infrastructure is, however, needed.

Up-to-date experience in assessment and condition inspection, monitoring, retrofitting, and maintenance of structures might not be considered suitable to facilitate confident decisions about the safety and reliability of structures. Reliably assessing structures helps to avoid failures and unnecessary decommissioning and leads to safer structures and better use of resources. Solving issues like efficient determination of structural and material properties, quantification of the impact of loading history, and load duration on structural performance is a key point in structural and civil engineering.

We thus invite the publication of original research studies, review papers, and experimental and/or numerical investigations on the mentioned topics. The analysis of sustainable structures is welcome at different levels, including material, component, and assembly aspects. Both new design projects or the retrofit and mitigation of existing structures, as well as case studies, will be of interest for this Special Issue.
Dr. Chiara Bedon
Dr. Mislav Stepinac
Dr. Marco Fasan
Dr. Ajitanshu Vedrtnam
Prof. Maged A. Youssef
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • structural systems
  • environmental and climate change
  • ambient conditions
  • vulnerability assessment
  • extreme design loads
  • experiments
  • numerical simulations
  • hazard
  • scour
  • infrastructure
  • sustainability
  • reliability
  • risk

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Using Intelligence Green Building Materials to Evaluate Color Change Performance
Sustainability 2020, 12(14), 5630; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12145630 - 13 Jul 2020
Abstract
Environmental protection is an important issue in modern society. Most construction demolition wastes cannot be easily decomposed, thus occupying a lot of space in landfill. Reducing the demand for new resources is an efficient approach to decrease the environmental burden. Most green buildings [...] Read more.
Environmental protection is an important issue in modern society. Most construction demolition wastes cannot be easily decomposed, thus occupying a lot of space in landfill. Reducing the demand for new resources is an efficient approach to decrease the environmental burden. Most green buildings are made from reused and recycled materials. Although there are a variety of green building materials available on the market, there is no material, as yet, with thermochromic functionality. This study used a form of face bricks, and six recovered materials, including wood chips, iron powder, fallen leaves, concrete, newspaper, and silt, to make smart green building materials. The modules were made in accordance with Taiwan’s green building material regulations. The discoloration efficiency of indoor and outdoor green building materials was tested, and the RGB (red, green, blue) values of the face bricks were measured by a color analyzer to observe the discoloration effect. The findings show that among the A, B, C, and D groups, Group D exhibited the optimal rate of change in color, and the rates of change in the six recycled waste materials of indoor Group D were wood chips > newspaper > fallen leaves > concrete > iron powder > silt, while the rates of change in the outdoor group were newspaper > wood chips > fallen leaves. This study successfully reused waste materials to reduce the environmental burden, achieve sustainable environmental protection, and ensure both the aesthetics and quality of the building materials. The results of this study can offer an alternative choice to architects or space designers when selecting green building materials. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Heat of Hydration Stresses in Stainless-Steel-Reinforced-Concrete Sections
Sustainability 2020, 12(12), 4852; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12124852 - 14 Jun 2020
Abstract
Stainless steel (SS) is increasingly used in construction due to its high strength and corrosion resistance. However, its coefficient of thermal expansion is different from that of concrete. This difference raises concerns about the potential for concrete cracking during the hydration process. To [...] Read more.
Stainless steel (SS) is increasingly used in construction due to its high strength and corrosion resistance. However, its coefficient of thermal expansion is different from that of concrete. This difference raises concerns about the potential for concrete cracking during the hydration process. To address this concern, a thermal-structural finite element model was developed to predict the stresses in SS-reinforced concrete (RC) sections during the hydration process. Different curing regimes were taken into consideration. The analysis was performed in two stages. First, a transient thermal analysis was performed to determine the temperature distribution within the concrete section as a function of concrete age and its thermal properties. The evaluated temperature distribution was then utilized to conduct stress analysis. The ability of the model to predict the stresses induced by the expansion of the bars relative to the surrounding concrete was validated using relevant studies by others. The model outcomes provide in-depth understanding of the heat of hydration stresses in the examined SS RC sections. The developed stresses were found to reach their peak during the first two days following concrete casting (i.e., when concrete strength is relatively small). Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Compressive Shear Strength of Reinforced Concrete Walls at High Ductility Levels
Sustainability 2020, 12(11), 4434; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114434 - 29 May 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The amount of energy dissipated during an earthquake depends on the type of failure of the concrete element. Shear failure should be avoided because less energy is spent than that due to bending failure. Compression controlled failure is usually avoided by increasing the [...] Read more.
The amount of energy dissipated during an earthquake depends on the type of failure of the concrete element. Shear failure should be avoided because less energy is spent than that due to bending failure. Compression controlled failure is usually avoided by increasing the thickness of a wall. Considering that the current code largely decreases this strength, this becomes hard to achieve in practice. Because of that, the analysis described in this paper is made to determine the reason for a large strength reduction at high curvatures. Mechanisms contributing to compression controlled shear strength are analysed. Using Rankine’s strength theorem, section equilibrium, arch mechanism and bending moment-curvature diagrams, the influence of different parameters are observed and charted. The findings are compared to the existing procedures and a new, simple and safe analytical equation is derived. Compression controlled shear strength is mainly influenced by axial force, followed by the amount of longitudinal reinforcement and the achieved confinement. Results show that the value of strength reduces significantly with the increase of ductility and that some reduction exists even for lower levels of curvature. Current code provisions may lead to unsafe design, so designers should be careful when dealing with potentially critical walls. Full article
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