Special Issue "Coping with Climate Change at Regional Level"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sustainability and Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. António Dinis Ferreira
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CERNAS Research Centre, Polytechnic Institute of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: wildfires; sustainable land management; conservation of natural resources
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change and/or the climate vagaries increasingly manifest themselves in increasingly frequent extreme events that hinder the functioning of societies and expose individuals to extremely stressful situations that endanger the quality of life, way of life and even the lives of the societies exposed to them.

This Special Issue aims to discuss the extent to which local and regional societies are exposed to extreme events and are affected by climate change, either by droughts, famines, floods, sea level rise, forest fires, etc., and how they develop and implement strategies to mitigate or adapt to those extreme situations.

We encourage the submission of research and review papers on the several interventional levels possible, from the political and legal framework level to the strategic, methodological and action implementation level.

Prof. Dr. António Dinis Ferreira
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Climate Change
  • Vulnerability
  • Environment and Societal impacts
  • Regional/National mitigation/adaptation strategies
  • Mitigation/adaptation techniques
  • Mitigation/adaptation policies and legislation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Growing Season Precipitation Rather than Growing Season Length Predominates Maximum Normalized Difference Vegetation Index in Alpine Grasslands on the Tibetan Plateau
Sustainability 2020, 12(3), 968; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12030968 - 29 Jan 2020
Viewed by 486
Abstract
Precipitation and growing season length (GSL) are vital abiotic and biotic variables in controlling vegetation productivity in alpine regions. However, their relative effects on vegetation productivity have not been fully understood. In this study, we examined the responses of the maximum normalized difference [...] Read more.
Precipitation and growing season length (GSL) are vital abiotic and biotic variables in controlling vegetation productivity in alpine regions. However, their relative effects on vegetation productivity have not been fully understood. In this study, we examined the responses of the maximum normalized difference vegetation index (NDVImax) to growing season precipitation (GSP) and GSL from 2000 to 2013 in 36 alpine grassland sites on the Tibetan Plateau. Our results indicated that NDVImax showed a positive relationship with prolonged GSL (R2 = 0.12) and GSP (R2 = 0.39). The linear slope of NDVImax increased with that of GSP rather than GSL. Therefore, GSP had a stronger effect on NDVImax than did GSL in alpine grasslands on the Tibetan Plateau. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coping with Climate Change at Regional Level)
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Open AccessArticle
Is Technical Efficiency Affected by Farmers’ Preference for Mitigation and Adaptation Actions against Climate Change? A Case Study in Northwest Mexico
Sustainability 2019, 11(12), 3291; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11123291 - 14 Jun 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1205
Abstract
Climate change has adverse effects on agriculture, decreasing crop quality and productivity. This makes it necessary to implement adaptation and mitigation strategies that contribute to the maintenance of technical efficiency (TE). This study analyzed the relationship of TE with farmers’ mitigation and adaptation [...] Read more.
Climate change has adverse effects on agriculture, decreasing crop quality and productivity. This makes it necessary to implement adaptation and mitigation strategies that contribute to the maintenance of technical efficiency (TE). This study analyzed the relationship of TE with farmers’ mitigation and adaptation action preferences, their risk and environmental attitudes, and their perception of climate change. Through the stochastic frontier method, TE levels were estimated for 370 farmers in Northwest Mexico. The results showed the average efficiency levels (57%) for three identified groups of farmers: High TE (15% of farmers), average TE (72%), and low TE (13%). Our results showed a relationship between two of the preferred adaptation actions against climate change estimated using the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) method. The most efficient farmers preferred “change crops,” while less efficient farmers preferred “invest in irrigation infrastructure.” The anthropocentric environmental attitude inferred from the New Ecological Paradigm (NEP) scale was related to the level of TE. Efficient farmers were those with an anthropocentric environmental attitude, compared to less efficient farmers, who exhibited an ecocentric attitude. The climate change issues were more perceived by moderately efficient farmers. These findings set out a roadmap for policy-makers to face climate change at the regional level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coping with Climate Change at Regional Level)
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Open AccessArticle
A Resilience Approach to Community-Scale Climate Adaptation
Sustainability 2019, 11(11), 3100; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11113100 - 01 Jun 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1285
Abstract
Climate risk is expected to impact rural communities in West Africa in multiple ways. However, most current research addresses resilience and climate adaptation at either the national or the household scale; very little is known about community-scale interventions. We interviewed 934 community members [...] Read more.
Climate risk is expected to impact rural communities in West Africa in multiple ways. However, most current research addresses resilience and climate adaptation at either the national or the household scale; very little is known about community-scale interventions. We interviewed 934 community members in six communities in southeastern Nigeria about sources of climate risk and community-based actions for climate change adaptation. We found these communities contained multiple active and engaged groups that have implemented a wide range of interventions to reduce climate risk, most of which are seen as effective by community members. Flooding was the most common form of risk in this region, but drought, windstorms, and irregular rainy seasons are also frequent, implying that effective climate adaptation will have to be sensitive to multiple types of risk. Structural interventions (constructing roads, bridges, etc.) were the most common type of intervention, suggesting that communities are capable of marshalling considerable organizational and human power for adaptation efforts, even in the absence of external assistance. Efforts to boost community resilience and adaptation to climate change would benefit from first understanding what community actions are currently underway, and working with the groups implementing these actions to support and extend them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coping with Climate Change at Regional Level)
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