Special Issue "City Logistics"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Transportation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Eiichi Taniguchi
Website
Guest Editor
Resilience Research Unit, Kyoto University, Rohm Plaza, Kyotodaigaku-Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8520 Japan
Interests: city logistics; urban freight transport; humanitarian logistics; ITS
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Russell Thompson
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Infrastructure Engineering, University of Melbourne, 3010 Melbourne, Australia
Interests: city logistics; urban and regional planning; transportation and freight services
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We face complicated and difficult issues with urban freight transport in terms of economic growth, environment, safety, and security. Most of the goods distribution in urban areas is executed using trucks and vans on road networks. Efficient and environmentally friendly urban freight transport systems are required for a sustainable society. Recently, smart solutions for city logistics using ITS (Intelligent Transport Systems), ICT (Information and Communication Technology, IoT (Internet of Things), AI (Artificial Intelligence), big data, and autonomous vehicles and robots have been proposed for tackling these problems and implemented in a number of cities.

This special issue will highlight new opportunities and challenges for sustainable urban freight transport, focusing on technological advancements and management initiatives, including public–private partnerships between stakeholders. We welcome papers on:

  • Modelling the behaviour of stakeholders and evaluating the performance of city logistics policy measures, including multi-agent, vehicle routing and scheduling with time windows, multi-echelon vehicle routing, facility location, multi-actor multi-criteria, and freight traffic flow models.
  • Evaluating the application of innovative technologies in city logistics, including ITS, ITC, IoT, AI, big data, autonomous delivery vehicles and robots, electric vehicles, and drones for smart cities, focusing on the integration of information technologies and urban freight transport systems.
  • Planning and management of city logistics schemes, encompassing collaboration between public and private sectors, multi-modal transport systems, sharing the capacities of logistics companies, integration of land use and urban freight transport planning, and space allocation of passenger traffic and freight transport on urban streets.
  • Case studies that evaluate city logistics initiatives, such as urban consolidation centres (UCCs), off-hour deliveries, parcel lockers, cargo cycles, cargo trams, and management of loading/unloading bays.
  • Future perspectives on sustainable urban freight transport.

Prof. Eiichi Taniguchi
Dr. Russell Thompson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (17 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Role of ‘Influencers’ as Drivers of a More Sustainable Urban Freight Sector
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 2850; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12072850 - 03 Apr 2020
Viewed by 762
Abstract
The importance of stakeholders in the development of a sustainable urban freight sector has been highlighted in recent research. Not all stakeholders have a direct link to the supply chain, but they may still play a role in creating sustainable urban freight initiatives. [...] Read more.
The importance of stakeholders in the development of a sustainable urban freight sector has been highlighted in recent research. Not all stakeholders have a direct link to the supply chain, but they may still play a role in creating sustainable urban freight initiatives. This study explores the initiatives that norm-setting indirect stakeholders in urban freight, referred to as ‘influencers’, establish to support a more sustainable urban freight sector, and how those initiatives may impact the business models of carriers. The study uses data gathered for ongoing research into the roles of indirect stakeholders in the development of sustainable urban freight initiatives. The results indicate that influencers can put pressure on receivers regarding logistical issues and shape the physical environment in which deliveries are conducted. Influencers use three primary strategies to support sustainable urban freight: vehicle-focused measures, consolidation linked to physical infrastructure, and consolidation through behavioural changes. These initiatives impact the relationship between receivers and carriers and may push carriers to adopt more sustainable practices as well as take decisions that impact their business models. The results highlight the often-overlooked power of influencers in relation to the development of actor behaviour in the urban freight supply chain and show the potential for both conflict and change arising from the use of this power. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Logistics)
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Open AccessArticle
Assessing Overnight Parking Infrastructure Policies for Commercial Vehicles in Cities Using Agent-Based Simulation
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 2673; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12072673 - 28 Mar 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 691
Abstract
Urban freight transport is primarily fulfilled by commercial road vehicles. Within cities, overnight parking is a critical element influencing commercial vehicle operations, particularly for heavy vehicles with limited parking options. Providing adequate overnight parking spaces for commercial vehicles tends to be a challenge [...] Read more.
Urban freight transport is primarily fulfilled by commercial road vehicles. Within cities, overnight parking is a critical element influencing commercial vehicle operations, particularly for heavy vehicles with limited parking options. Providing adequate overnight parking spaces for commercial vehicles tends to be a challenge for urban planners. Inadequate parking supply can result in illegal parking and additional vehicle kilometers traveled, contributing to traffic congestion and air pollution. The lack of tools for evaluating the impacts of changing parking supply is an impediment in developing parking-related solutions that aim to minimize the negative externalities. In this study, we develop an overnight parking choice model for heavy commercial vehicles and integrate it with SimMobility, an agent-based urban simulation platform, demonstrating the potential of this tool for policy evaluation. Using simulations applied to a case study in Singapore, we compare two parking supply scenarios in terms of vehicle kilometers traveled due to changes in the first and last trips of vehicle tours, as well as resulting impacts in traffic flows. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Logistics)
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Open AccessArticle
Accessibility to Food Retailers: The Case of Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 2654; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12072654 - 27 Mar 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 731
Abstract
Access to food products is essential to sustain life. In this paper, we discuss the differences concerning accessibility levels to food retailers among potential consumers in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The goal was to characterize spatial mismatches regarding opportunities to access food and identify [...] Read more.
Access to food products is essential to sustain life. In this paper, we discuss the differences concerning accessibility levels to food retailers among potential consumers in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The goal was to characterize spatial mismatches regarding opportunities to access food and identify suitable areas for sustainable last food mile solutions, such as non-motorized home delivery and purchase trips. For this, we have spatially related: (i) the population concentration; (ii) the income of households and (iii) accessibility measures considering both the spatial structure of food retailers and the distance between households and stores, considering the food last mile. We have then used spatial statistics (Global Moran’s I index, average nearest neighborhood analysis) and spatial analyses (overlay and processing) to determine the spatial pattern and the relation of the variables population, income, and accessibility to food retailers. We have considered the cumulative-opportunity measure, which is an indicator of the number of opportunities that can be reached within a time threshold. There is great spatial differentiation regarding the accessibility levels of food retailers and the results can be considered to support the development of policy and land use regulation that can stimulate non-motorized and collaborative delivery as an effective last-mile solution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Logistics)
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Open AccessArticle
A Multi-commodity Network Flow Model for Sustainable Performance Evaluation in City Logistics: Application to the Distribution of Multi-tenant Buildings in Tokyo
Sustainability 2020, 12(6), 2180; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12062180 - 11 Mar 2020
Viewed by 937
Abstract
The distribution of goods in crowded city centers is a major challenge. In this paper, we propose a methodology for evaluating the performance of a parcel distribution network in city logistics. This methodology encompasses the main entities of a two-tier distribution system made [...] Read more.
The distribution of goods in crowded city centers is a major challenge. In this paper, we propose a methodology for evaluating the performance of a parcel distribution network in city logistics. This methodology encompasses the main entities of a two-tier distribution system made up of carriers, huge shopping centers (multi-tenant buildings) and intermediate depots (urban consolidation centers), as well as the parcel flows between them. This methodology aims to optimize the transport flows (distance traveled) of a given distribution network while also quantifying the impact in terms of sustainable development by measuring gas emissions. Two different states of the network with different connectivity degrees are evaluated and compared: the current state of the network as well as its future state. The transport network modeling is based on a network flow, which is expressed in linear programming and implemented with an optimization solver. The validation of this methodology is based on the parcel distribution of the Multi-tenant Buildings of the city of Tokyo. The findings are that the network with greater connectivity between the entities brings significant traveled distance reduction as well as a reduction of emissions of CO2. Another finding is that the grouping of the parcels (i.e., pooling) brings a reduction of the distance traveled compared to the transport organization without grouping and contributes to a reduction in the number of trucks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Logistics)
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Open AccessArticle
A Theoretical Research Framework of Future Sustainable Urban Freight Transport for Smart Cities
Sustainability 2020, 12(5), 1975; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12051975 - 05 Mar 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 991
Abstract
This paper aims to construct a theoretical research framework for sustainable urban freight transport (SUFT) from the perspectives of future urban development and distribution innovations, and appropriate research methods are discussed, as well. Urban freight transport plays a critical role in the promotion [...] Read more.
This paper aims to construct a theoretical research framework for sustainable urban freight transport (SUFT) from the perspectives of future urban development and distribution innovations, and appropriate research methods are discussed, as well. Urban freight transport plays a critical role in the promotion of sustainable and livable cities. According to the literature review, considerable research on SUFT has focused on resolving some specific problems with a short-term perspective. The existence of an urban freight transport strategy is noted, which should be embedded in an overall sustainable development strategy with a long-term perspective (approximately 20–30 years). Nevertheless, considerable research has paid scant attention to the long-term planning of SUFT. Given this, this paper contributes to the closure of this gap. First, this paper presents a systematic literature review (SLR) to highlight published papers involving foresight research within the past 16 years (2003–2018). This step contributes to the understanding of research methods that can be used in foresight research. Subsequently, this paper discusses the impacts of both urban development and distribution innovations on future SUFT, and these effects are used to select the appropriate methods to construct the theoretical research framework. Finally, the theoretical research framework of long-term planning for SUFT is developed on the basis of two future perspectives: the trends of urban development and the application of urban distribution innovations. This framework is intended to provide an approach to designing sustainable urban logistics, taking into account urban development and distribution innovations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Logistics)
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Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceArticle
Investigating the Effects of City Logistics Measures on the Economy of the City
Sustainability 2020, 12(4), 1439; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12041439 - 15 Feb 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1173
Abstract
The paper deals with economic effects due to city logistics implementations. An analysis framework is proposed and the results of a survey, consisting of interviews with experts in city logistics, are presented. The survey was carried out to point out the level of [...] Read more.
The paper deals with economic effects due to city logistics implementations. An analysis framework is proposed and the results of a survey, consisting of interviews with experts in city logistics, are presented. The survey was carried out to point out the level of benefits or costs expected by city logistics measure implementation. The results show that city users are expected to receive more benefits from environment-friendly vehicle measures, while transport and logistics operators can averagely obtain considerable benefits from demand management and public–private collaboration solutions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Logistics)
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Open AccessArticle
A Model for Sustainable Courier Services: Vehicle Routing with Exclusive Lanes
Sustainability 2020, 12(3), 1077; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12031077 - 03 Feb 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 687
Abstract
In Southeast Asian cities, it is common for logistic companies to operate a heterogeneous fleet of delivery vehicles with motorcycles being the preferred vehicle to handle the final phase of delivery. In such scenarios, heterogeneous fleet vehicle routing problem (HFVRP) is generally applied [...] Read more.
In Southeast Asian cities, it is common for logistic companies to operate a heterogeneous fleet of delivery vehicles with motorcycles being the preferred vehicle to handle the final phase of delivery. In such scenarios, heterogeneous fleet vehicle routing problem (HFVRP) is generally applied to plan an optimal delivery. However, in many downtown cores of large and rapidly developing Southeast Asian cities, HFVRP is neither viable nor reliable because of road usage restrictions. The purpose of this article is to develop and test a different approach that accurately takes these restrictions into account and provides viable and more sustainable results. Restrictions in this paper refer to situations of urban areas in Vietnam where (i) certain vehicle types are prohibited in specified areas or where narrow alleyways limit the utilization of vehicles that exceed the road capacity and (ii) certain roads are exclusive to certain vehicle types. In networks, limited access and exclusive lanes are represented as links, or arcs, exclusive to one or another. Taking these limitations into consideration, we have developed a unique model, which we have termed Vehicle Routing Problem with Exclusive Links (VRP-EL). The model was validated and tested for its performance on scenarios with varying ratios of exclusive links. Scenarios up to 500 customers were tested on a meta-heuristic algorithm, simulated annealing. VRP-EL produces realistic outcomes. Limiting certain links to be selected according to vehicle types increases overall travel distance. However, this increase outweighs the cost of re-planning and rerouting had they not been constrained initially. The reduction in traveling distance leads to fossil fuel reduction for the overall system. The estimation of reduced carbon emissions through applying the proposed model is presented. Considering the severe traffic congestion and carbon emissions caused by motorcycles in Vietnam, the proposed model leads to a sustainable road environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Logistics)
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Open AccessArticle
Shaping Urban Freight Systems via a Participatory Approach to Inform Policy-Making
Sustainability 2020, 12(1), 441; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010441 - 06 Jan 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2556
Abstract
In the upcoming era of new technologies, a transport system is expected to be ‘more sustainable,’ ‘safer,’ and ‘more efficient.’ However, to what extent is this true? Based on the results of a series of stakeholder engagement workshops, the paper explores the vision [...] Read more.
In the upcoming era of new technologies, a transport system is expected to be ‘more sustainable,’ ‘safer,’ and ‘more efficient.’ However, to what extent is this true? Based on the results of a series of stakeholder engagement workshops, the paper explores the vision of different stakeholders about urban freight of the future. A Participatory Approach was used to allow stakeholders to identify the problem and co-design a set of solutions. Potential impacts of innovative urban deliveries on economy, environment, and society were analysed. Methodology and results were then compared with those of a city stakeholder engagement workshop delivered in Newcastle upon-Tyne in 2014. Stakeholders considered that an “engaging” and “easy to use” process was needed to facilitate the process and it encouraged participants to find solutions for a ‘common good.’ The participatory approach proposed in this process would support transport planners and policy-makers to design and implement a consistent policy framework for future sustainable urban freight systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Logistics)
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Open AccessArticle
A Time-Efficiency Study of Medium-Duty Trucks Delivering in Urban Environments
Sustainability 2020, 12(1), 425; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010425 - 06 Jan 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 782
Abstract
This paper uses data from a major logistics service provider in Gothenburg (Sweden) to (i) identify the different activities in a typical urban distribution tour, (ii) quantify the time required by drivers to perform each of these activities, and (iii) identify potential initiatives [...] Read more.
This paper uses data from a major logistics service provider in Gothenburg (Sweden) to (i) identify the different activities in a typical urban distribution tour, (ii) quantify the time required by drivers to perform each of these activities, and (iii) identify potential initiatives to improve time efficiency. To do so, the authors collected GPS data, conducted a time-study of the activities performed by the drivers for a week, conducted a focus group with the drivers, and a set of interviews with managers. The results show that driving represents only 30% of the time, another 15% is spent on breaks, and the remaining 55% is used to perform activities related to customer service, freight handling, and planning. The latter are subdivided into multiple activities, each taking a small amount of time. A focus group with the drivers and some interviews revealed several initiatives to improve time efficiency. Most initiatives can bring small gains, but when aggregating all potential time savings there is a big potential to improve overall time efficiency. Initiatives with highest potential and low cost are: providing better pre-advice on upcoming customers, improving route planning, having hand-free cell phone use, and enhancing handling equipment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Logistics)
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Open AccessArticle
Priorities of Urban Transport System Stakeholders According to Crowd Logistics Solutions in City Areas. A Sustainability Perspective
Sustainability 2020, 12(1), 317; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010317 - 31 Dec 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 877
Abstract
This article presents assessment results for the priorities of different urban logistics stakeholders in order to launch crowd logistics (CL) solutions within a city area. Additionally, this analysis was conducted by using various dimensions of sustainable city development. The unique character of this [...] Read more.
This article presents assessment results for the priorities of different urban logistics stakeholders in order to launch crowd logistics (CL) solutions within a city area. Additionally, this analysis was conducted by using various dimensions of sustainable city development. The unique character of this study lies in presenting the priorities of the interviewed stakeholders. Therefore, the purpose of this publication is to analyze the priorities of various stakeholders in relation to the introduction of CL solutions within a city area. The reason for such analysis is the rapid development of a large number of sharing-economy initiatives, including services. For this study, a few methods were used to achieve the research goal. Firstly, text mining and text analysis methods were implemented to analyze the opinions of the interviewees. Then, two chi-square tests allowed us to determine whether the groups of stakeholders are statistically different or not. Finally, the AHP (analytic hierarchy process) and DEMATEL (decision making trial and evaluation laboratory) methods were applied in order to define the priorities of the stakeholders. The needs of particular groups of respondents were derived from the interview based on the questionnaire. The results of the analysis allow for defining the demand characteristics for CL solutions by presenting the areas that are crucial for particular groups of stakeholders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Logistics)
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Open AccessArticle
Factors Affecting the Choice of Urban Freight Vehicles: Issues Related to Brazilian Companies
Sustainability 2019, 11(24), 7010; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11247010 - 08 Dec 2019
Viewed by 735
Abstract
In this paper, we present the attributes that influence the choice of an urban freight vehicle by using a systematic literature review and a survey conducted with logistics operators that perform urban deliveries in some of the biggest cities in Brazil. The results [...] Read more.
In this paper, we present the attributes that influence the choice of an urban freight vehicle by using a systematic literature review and a survey conducted with logistics operators that perform urban deliveries in some of the biggest cities in Brazil. The results obtained facilitate the analysis and determination of the main attributes of vehicle selection in some cities of Brazil. Descriptive statistics are used to describe the characteristics of the companies, and a principal component analysis identifies the dependent variables, in order to evaluate the importance of each attribute. Also, an ordered logistic regression model is used to identify if the characteristics of the companies influence the choice of an urban freight vehicle. The results of this analysis indirectly indicate the dependence of the decision-making process on the logistics policies implemented in a given city. These attributes agree with those in the literature review. These results, despite of being evident, are different from the present selection criteria, which depend on local city policies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Logistics)
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Open AccessArticle
Transport Service Provider Perception of Barriers and Urban Freight Policies in Brazil
Sustainability 2019, 11(24), 6890; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11246890 - 04 Dec 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 674
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to analyze the perceptions of the transport service providers on the barriers in urban freight transport and the restrictions imposed on freight vehicles, identifying which urban freight transport policies can improve this activity in Brazil. Principal component [...] Read more.
The aim of this paper is to analyze the perceptions of the transport service providers on the barriers in urban freight transport and the restrictions imposed on freight vehicles, identifying which urban freight transport policies can improve this activity in Brazil. Principal component analysis allowed us to identify which are barriers in urban cargo transport and the restrictions imposed on freight vehicles. In addition, we evaluated freight policies that can improve the activity using probabilistic preference. We obtained the database from a web-based survey of transport service providers in Brazil. The results indicate that the urban freight vehicle restriction is related to congestion and availability of loading and unloading areas. The freight vehicle restriction is a result of the lack of information and data. The theft of cargo significantly impacts urban freight transport. Transport service provider company perceptions indicate an urban mobility plan as the most-required freight policy to improve freight mobility. To reduce the barriers to urban freight planning, an understanding of the problem involving the stakeholders is needed. To do so, the challenge is to change the culture in the transportation planning process by integrating various actors to create an urban logistics plan that generates opportunities for the city. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Logistics)
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Open AccessArticle
Daytime or Overnight Deliveries? Perceptions of Drivers and Retailers in São Paulo City
Sustainability 2019, 11(22), 6316; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11226316 - 11 Nov 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 551
Abstract
This research aims to analyze the perception of logistics operators and retailers regarding freight deliveries in the city of São Paulo. Based on a survey applied to 100 logistics operators and 84 retailers, the data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and multiple correspondence [...] Read more.
This research aims to analyze the perception of logistics operators and retailers regarding freight deliveries in the city of São Paulo. Based on a survey applied to 100 logistics operators and 84 retailers, the data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) was used to investigate the logistics efficiency of off-hours deliveries (OHD) and to indicate issues when carrying out OHD. From that sample, noise appears as the most critical issue of OHD for retailers. From the results, most logistics operators and retailers prefer to deliver cargo at night. The advantages of making OHD are the ability to check/store goods, the accuracy in the delivery schedule due to traffic conditions, and the ease of parking a vehicle to offload goods. Public authorities should improve the infrastructure to receive goods, including public lighting conditions and sidewalks. The correspondence analysis method showed that the level of customer service quality depends on the punctuality of the trucks and the ability to check and store goods. Furthermore, by highlighting the logistics efficiency and issues related to daytime and overnight deliveries by carriers and receivers, it can guide public polices and initiatives of other companies, an aspect that has been lacking in the literature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Logistics)
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Open AccessArticle
Understanding Construction Logistics in Urban Areas and Lowering Its Environmental Impact: A Focus on Construction Consolidation Centres
Sustainability 2019, 11(21), 6118; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11216118 - 03 Nov 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 827
Abstract
A lot of attention has been paid in the last years to urban freight transport (UFT) activities generated by specific market segments such as food, retail, or home deliveries, while relatively little attention has been paid to the transport of goods to and [...] Read more.
A lot of attention has been paid in the last years to urban freight transport (UFT) activities generated by specific market segments such as food, retail, or home deliveries, while relatively little attention has been paid to the transport of goods to and from construction sites in urban areas. Although transport of construction materials represents up to 30% of freight movements in cities and even more in terms of pollutant emissions. Using data collected over eight months in four construction sites, this paper provides a better understanding of the urban freight transport activity related to construction and presents the potential benefits of the implementation of construction consolidation centres (CCCs). A CCC is an innovative approach, which aims at increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of logistics processes by reducing the number of deliveries. Consequently, the use of a CCC in urban areas can reduce congestion and pollutant emissions due to construction freight movements. This paper presents results of CCC usage simulations for the four construction sites mentioned above. The results suggest that the distribution of goods to and from construction sites is peculiar as compared to other, better-known, urban supply chains and reinforce the call to researchers and decision makers from both private and public sides to devote more attention to this market segment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Logistics)
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Open AccessArticle
The Tendency of Urban Stakeholders to Adopt Sustainable Logistics Measures on the Example of a Polish Metropolis
Sustainability 2019, 11(21), 5909; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11215909 - 24 Oct 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 615
Abstract
The scale of policies and measures for sustainable urban freight transport in European cities is still insignificant. However, the situation is changing as more and more cities are adopting sustainable urban logistics plans (SULPs). The situation in cities is extremely heterogeneous, so it [...] Read more.
The scale of policies and measures for sustainable urban freight transport in European cities is still insignificant. However, the situation is changing as more and more cities are adopting sustainable urban logistics plans (SULPs). The situation in cities is extremely heterogeneous, so it would be difficult to point to one single policy that fits all. Yet the tool created with European projects constituting an instruction to prepare SULP allows us to follow the standardized steps, regardless of the conditions found in particular cities. The effectiveness of implementing sustainable measures to a large extent depends on the level of acceptability of individual urban space stakeholders. The article presents the results of a survey conducted among stakeholders of a Polish metropolis—the Gdansk–Gdynia–Sopot metropolitan area. The analysis showed that acceptability rises with the increase in the size of the surveyed entities. The most diversified acceptability ratings were obtained for the transport infrastructure solutions. Proposals for Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) solutions are rated more positively by medium-sized and large enterprises. These solutions are assessed with greater caution by small and micro enterprises. The least diversified and clearly higher acceptance indicators were obtained for proposals in the scope of shaping sustainable urban transport development. The assessments obtained from the respondents should therefore constitute an important element of the works for developing the sustainable urban logistics plans starting in 2020 and also the opinions can be an important element of the future sustainable urban logistics plans, which are currently being developed in many European cities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Logistics)
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Open AccessArticle
Importance of the Stakeholders’ Interaction: Comparative, Longitudinal Study of Two City Logistics Initiatives
Sustainability 2019, 11(20), 5844; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11205844 - 21 Oct 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 906
Abstract
The main purpose of the paper is to explore the importance of stakeholders’ interaction in the different stages of the implementation process of city logistics initiatives and to assess the extent to which interaction may vary between two apparently similar initiatives. A comparative, [...] Read more.
The main purpose of the paper is to explore the importance of stakeholders’ interaction in the different stages of the implementation process of city logistics initiatives and to assess the extent to which interaction may vary between two apparently similar initiatives. A comparative, longitudinal study, with data from two Swedish city logistics initiatives is conducted. The findings highlight the multiple stakeholders’ interaction and suggest that various degrees of such interaction can be beneficial for sustainable city logistics initiatives. The study demonstrates that although the interactions can be considered broadly similar, there are differences that have an impact on the implementation and development of such initiatives over time. It also highlights the relevance of integrating initiatives with existing networks to provide longer-term viability in the implementation process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Logistics)
Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceArticle
Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans: How Do They Work?
Sustainability 2019, 11(17), 4605; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11174605 - 24 Aug 2019
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 1268
Abstract
The growing demand for passenger and freight transport in cities, resulting from the population growth in urbanized areas, has led to increasing problems with congestion, environmental pollution and, as a consequence, to a decrease in quality of life. This problem was noticed by [...] Read more.
The growing demand for passenger and freight transport in cities, resulting from the population growth in urbanized areas, has led to increasing problems with congestion, environmental pollution and, as a consequence, to a decrease in quality of life. This problem was noticed by the European Commission, which began to promote the concept of sustainable urban mobility plans (SUMPs). The efficient implementation of SUMPs requires tools for its evaluation. However, in the literature, most proposed assessment tools relate mainly to passenger transport, omitting the freight transport. The purpose of this paper is to utilize a multiple criteria analysis with the use of the Promethee method in order to assess the level of advancement of selected European Union (EU) capital cities in the field of sustainable urban mobility plan formulation and implementation. This method has been applied on the basis of a survey conducted among representatives of 15 EU capital cities and analyses of transportation plans. This research shows that cities that have a comprehensive transport plan consistently collaborate with different stakeholder groups, have implemented the greatest number of measures in the field of sustainable urban transport, and have achieved the best results in terms of safety and NO2 (nitrogen oxides) and PM (particulate matter) emissions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Logistics)
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