Special Issue "Circular Economy and Sustainable Strategies"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Use of the Environment and Resources".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Elena Cristina Rada
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Insubria University of Varese, Department of Theoretical and Applied Sciences – DiSTA, Via G.B. Vico, 46, 21100, Varese, Italy
Interests: waste management; air quality; renewable energy; environmental sustainability; circular economy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Lucian-Ionel Cioca
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Industrial Engineering and Management Department, Faculty of Engineering, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, 10 Victoriei Blv., 550024, Sibiu, Romania
Interests: management; human resources management; occupational health and safety management; production systems engineering; ergonomics; circular economy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Circular Economy and the Sustainable Strategies are the most significant issues in all projects and proposals in many sectors. The closing the loop approach is constantly gaining importance and is beginning to be asked at all the levels. The 9R (Responsibility, React, Reduce, Reuse, Re-design, Repair, Recover, Recycle and Rot) development strategy will help to retain materials and products in the economy for as long as possible, saving primary reserves.

The focus of this Special Issue on “Circular Economy and Sustainable Strategies” aims to collect up-to-date research articles that explore, examine and make proposals for a better world, taking into account the environment, human health, as well as the economic benefits. This Special Issue will incorporate articles that examine current policies, qualitative and quantitative measurements in the materials treatment sector and use/reuse, techno-economical aspects, multi-criteria systems for consuming, and closing the loop strategies. Papers on innovative developments, the environment, human health and the economy, reviews and case studies are also welcome.

The Guest Editors will select high quality research papers to proceed with blind peer reviews. Reviewers will be selected among researchers active in the field, whose works are present in international databases.

Within the framework described above, this Special Issue invites authors to contribute in the following fields (keywords):

  • Circular Economy Indicators;
  • Circular Economy Strategies;
  • Trash to Treasure;
  • Life-Cycle-Assessment;
  • Business Model for Circular Economy and Sustainability;
  • Circular, Green and Bio-Economy;
  • Consuming Strategies and Economic Optimization;
  • Health, Safety, Environment and Management;
  • Closing the Loop Strategies.

Dr. Elena Cristina Rada
Prof. Dr. Lucian-Ionel Cioca
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Economic and Ecological Impacts of Dismantling End-of-Life Vehicles in Romania
Sustainability 2019, 11(22), 6446; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11226446 - 15 Nov 2019
Abstract
In a global market characterized by the trend of saving non-renewable resources, recycling has become one of the key factors that alleviates the rarity of resources and preserves existing ones. One of the largest industries that consumes natural resources is the automotive industry. [...] Read more.
In a global market characterized by the trend of saving non-renewable resources, recycling has become one of the key factors that alleviates the rarity of resources and preserves existing ones. One of the largest industries that consumes natural resources is the automotive industry. This includes not only resource consumption but also the environmental effects of each new unit produced in this industry. As a result, recycling end-of-life vehicles has become an increasingly obvious and widespread concern. This paper proposes a preliminary analysis of the dismantling/recycling activities in Romania compared to other economies (e.g., USA). It aims to determine the impact that dismantling end-of-life vehicles has, according to the legislation in the field, on the economy and the environment. In order to obtain a complete picture, it is obvious that further research is needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Circular Economy and Sustainable Strategies)
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Open AccessArticle
Circular Economy for Food Policy: The Case of the RePoPP Project in The City of Turin (Italy)
Sustainability 2019, 11(21), 6078; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11216078 - 01 Nov 2019
Abstract
Circular economy for food (CE) and food policies (FP) are two emerging but already prominent research areas, particularly when talking about the cities of the future. This paper analyzes the dynamics between these two fields of research, starting from review articles and the [...] Read more.
Circular economy for food (CE) and food policies (FP) are two emerging but already prominent research areas, particularly when talking about the cities of the future. This paper analyzes the dynamics between these two fields of research, starting from review articles and the analysis of a case study, underlying the fundaments that FP and CE share. In particular, this paper focuses on using circular economy (CE) indicators and strategies to shape urban food policies (FP) to create a new business and political model towards sustainability. It introduces four converging perspectives, emerging from the literature, and analyzes how they have been integrated in the case study RePoPP (Re-design Project of Organic waste in Porta Palazzo market), a circular project born from the FP of the City of Turin (Italy). RePoPP is indeed a multi-actor project of urban circular food policies against food waste, which demonstrates how a circular approach can be the turning point in the creation of new food policies. This article wants to define for the first time a new research framework called “circular economy for food policy”, along with its characteristics: the application of a systemic approach and CE to problems and solutions, the need for a transdisciplinary and integrated project design for the 9R (responsibility, react, reduce, reuse, re-design, repair, recover, recycle, and rot), the use of food as a pivot of cross-sectoral change, and a new form of collaborative and integrated governance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Circular Economy and Sustainable Strategies)
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Open AccessArticle
Sustainability of Circular Economy Indicators and Their Impact on Economic Growth of the European Union
Sustainability 2019, 11(19), 5481; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11195481 - 03 Oct 2019
Abstract
In this paper, we develop a methodology for studying the sustainability of the circular economy model, based on environmental indicators, and its impact on European Union (EU) economic growth. In open-end systems, waste is converted back to materials and objects through recycling; hence, [...] Read more.
In this paper, we develop a methodology for studying the sustainability of the circular economy model, based on environmental indicators, and its impact on European Union (EU) economic growth. In open-end systems, waste is converted back to materials and objects through recycling; hence, a linear economy is transformed into a circular economy (CE). Environmental factors support the argument for the sustainable implementation of a circular economy. The main objective of this paper is to analyze the sustainability of the CE indicators and to elaborate a multilinear regression model with panel data for determining the dependency of the main CE factors on EU economic growth. Starting with the model of economic growth based on circular material use rate, recycling rate of municipal waste (RRMW), trade in recycling materials, labor productivity, environmental taxes, and resource productivity as independent variables, six statistical hypotheses were validated through a multiple regression model with the use of the statistical software EViews 11. The research study was conducted for 27 EU countries, and the data was collected from the European Union Statistical Office (EUROSTAT), during the time frame 2010 to 2017. Based on econometric modeling, the paper highlights that circular economy generates sustainable economic growth across the EU. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Circular Economy and Sustainable Strategies)
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Open AccessArticle
Consumer Perceptions Related to Clothing Repair and Community Mending Events: A Circular Economy Perspective
Sustainability 2019, 11(19), 5306; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11195306 - 26 Sep 2019
Abstract
While research focusing on clothing repair and community mending events as part of sustainable clothing consumption practices has been conducted in some developed European countries (e.g., the U.K. and the Netherlands), little research has examined consumer clothes mending/repairing behavior in a U.S. context. [...] Read more.
While research focusing on clothing repair and community mending events as part of sustainable clothing consumption practices has been conducted in some developed European countries (e.g., the U.K. and the Netherlands), little research has examined consumer clothes mending/repairing behavior in a U.S. context. The purpose of this study was to explore U.S. consumers’ specific barriers and motivations to engage in clothing repair and their likelihood to participate in clothes mending and community mending events. An intercept survey approach was used to administer a questionnaire to participants who were attendees at three different events in a mid-sized city in Colorado, U.S. across a two-week time span. Data were collected from 254 participants. Path analysis was conducted to test four sets of hypotheses. The results suggested that consumers’ perceived barriers negatively influenced their mending frequency. Consumer’s perceived motivations positively influenced their attitudes toward mending, their mending frequency, and sustainable post-consumption clothing behaviors (SPCBs). Furthermore, participants’ attitudes toward mending, mending frequency, and their SPCBs positively influenced their intentions to mend clothes and to participate in community mending events. The current study advances the understanding of US consumers’ clothes mending behaviors and provides critical implications for local governments and education systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Circular Economy and Sustainable Strategies)
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Open AccessArticle
The Ecological Criteria of Circular Growth and the Rebound Risk of Closed Loops
Sustainability 2019, 11(10), 2961; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11102961 - 24 May 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The implementation practices of the circular economy (CE) put a strong emphasis on preventing material losses in economic processes. The general interpretation of the concept focuses on closing technological and biological cycles by reintegrating end-of-life products into production and consumption systems. Thus, “closed [...] Read more.
The implementation practices of the circular economy (CE) put a strong emphasis on preventing material losses in economic processes. The general interpretation of the concept focuses on closing technological and biological cycles by reintegrating end-of-life products into production and consumption systems. Thus, “closed loops” have become a trademark of circular transition. However, this limited perception fails to cover the essence of the CE. Besides closure, the utility of material loops can be prolonged, and a conscious consumer attitude may even prevent the creation of unnecessary material flows. This paper aims at proving that the preference of closed loops would result in deadweight losses in the long run. The conducted analysis ranks EU member states according to the most anticipated material flow indicators. Then, the study presents a new methodology to measure circular efficiency based on the available ecological capacity of the countries. The outcomes show that the poorly performing actors are in fact not far from a sustainable operation. Meanwhile, the countries with the most efficient material flow values present the widest development gap to reach the ideal level of circularity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Circular Economy and Sustainable Strategies)
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