Topical Collection "Today's Climate Migrants: Extreme Events, Displacement, and New Barriers to Movement"

A topical collection in Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760). This collection belongs to the section "International Migration".

Editors

Dr. Andrea C. Simonelli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Political Science, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284, USA
Interests: climate change; migration; global governance; human security, adaptation, resilience; Indian Ocean and Pacific island states
Ms. Heather R. Croshaw, J.D., LL.M, M.E.M
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Adaptation Strategies International, Denver, CO 80209, USA
Interests: international climate change negotiations; U.S. climate change law and policy; environmental law; disaster risk reduction and resilience; Caribbean and South Pacific islands

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

The warmest years on record have all occurred in the last couple of decades with the hottest five since 2015[1]. Climate change is no longer a future scenario - it is here now. Some regions have already felt the adverse impacts of climate change more quickly and severely than other places on earth. Displacement from extreme events in this era is climate displacement, and climate migration is happening now all over the world. While cyclones/hurricanes, torrential flooding, storm surge, heat waves, etc. are not new phenomenon, the latest science now attributes increased intensities of these extreme events to climate change.

It is from the temporal dimension of ‘now” that this special edition seeks to solicit papers. Against this backdrop, the novel COVID-19 virus and resulting pandemic has also brought unintended barriers to movement and has triggered additional migration issues such as health security, travel restrictions, and border closures. The current moment is unique as it poses multiple and overlapping challenges to mobility decision-making and climate change-induced migration.

Scholars are invited to submit papers which consider climate migration and displacement through:

  • Current/recent displacement activities (internal or cross-border)
  • Community-based decision making
  • Migrant-centered perspectives
  • Temporary relocation in hot spots
  • Temporary aid program analysis
  • Barriers to migration such as:
    • COVID-19 related border closures
    • Lack of vaccination records
    • Land tenure rights
    • COVID related economic downturn

Original papers on the indicated topics are welcome from any discipline; new scholars and scholars from marginalized backgrounds are encouraged to contribute.

[1] https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/news/projected-ranks

Dr. Andrea C. Simonelli
Ms. Heather R. Croshaw, J.D., LL.M, M.E.M
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • Climate Change
  • Migration
  • Displacement
  • Extreme Events
  • Policy
  • Law
  • Movement
  • Barriers 

Published Papers (2 papers)

2021

Article
Gender and Place of Settlement as Predictors of Perceived Social Support, PTSD, and Insomnia among Internally Displaced Adolescents in North-East Nigeria
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(11), 428; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10110428 - 07 Nov 2021
Viewed by 1247
Abstract
Previous research has shown that gender affects social support and post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD). The present study explores the main and interaction effects of gender and place of settlement on social support, PTSD symptoms, and insomnia in internally displaced adolescents (IDAs) in North-east [...] Read more.
Previous research has shown that gender affects social support and post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD). The present study explores the main and interaction effects of gender and place of settlement on social support, PTSD symptoms, and insomnia in internally displaced adolescents (IDAs) in North-east of Nigeria. A stratified sampling method was used to select 109 participants from IDAs living in the camp, while 27 additional IDAs were purposively recruited from those living in the host community. Participants completed measures of Harvard Trauma Questionnaire Part-II, Insomnia Severity Index, and Crisis Support. No significant effects of gender on perceived social support, PTSDs, and insomnia were observed. Place of settlement had a significant effect on social support, with IDAs living in the camp having a higher mean score, while place of settlement had no significant effects on PTSD and insomnia. A significant interaction effect of gender and place of settlements on insomnia was found, with males living in the community having a higher mean score than their female counterparts, as well as both males and females in the camp. In conclusion, there is a need to understand male IDAs who reside in non-camp settings better, including the nature of their challenges, the outcomes they desire, and the limitations they experienced. Full article
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Figure 1

Article
Domestic Structures, Misalignment, and Defining the Climate Displacement Problem
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(11), 425; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10110425 - 04 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1136
Abstract
This paper contrasts how climate reports describe displacement with how analyses of moving after disaster have described whether people move. The paper argues that domestic structures govern displacement, and are likely to continue to. Domestically, people have different legal statuses and access to [...] Read more.
This paper contrasts how climate reports describe displacement with how analyses of moving after disaster have described whether people move. The paper argues that domestic structures govern displacement, and are likely to continue to. Domestically, people have different legal statuses and access to resources, which shape the ability to move. Authoritative governance documents on climate change, including the United States National Climate Assessment, argue that climate change will lead to increasing numbers of displaced people. On the other hand, demographers and economists who study where people move to after disaster have argued that climate reports overstate the risk of mass displacement, based in what has happened after past disasters. Domestic governance processes influence resettlement, and they can change. Studies of whether people move after disaster do not take into account how changes in insurance rates or other rules shaping where people live could reshape resettlement. On the other hand, analyses of governing potential climate displacement draw on international agreements and documents. has often centered on islands advocates argue will disappear, not the changing habitability of places that also depends on the resources people have. The image of disappearing islands misdirects from the risks of climate displacement in wealthier countries, where some people have extensive resources and others do not. This paper argues that the risk of displacement requires turning to follow the domestic governance processes that shape people’s decisions now. This approach fits with calls to work from people’s claims up to governance processes, rather than from processes downward. Full article
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