Trade and Human Rights

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760). This special issue belongs to the section "Contemporary Politics and Society".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2020) | Viewed by 7128

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Political Science, University College London, London WC1H 9QU, UK
Interests: international organisations; World Bank; IMF; human rights violations; civil conflict

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The link between trade and human rights remains a deeply contentious topic. Does trade, and the intergovernmental organizations which manage different aspects of its rules and governance, advance the human rights of citizens around the world, or does competition between firms and states, as well as the decisions made by these organisations privilege capital at the expense of peoples’ rights? Research is now also considering that the linkages between trade and human rights may be far more conditional than we had previously thought. There is some indication that the link between trade and human rights may varying across different levels of development, regime types, and economic sectors. There is also some discussion about how both domestic and international politics complicates the linkages between economic exchange and states’ human rights practices.

Submissions are invited for a Special Issue examining “Trade and Human Rights”. The aim of this Special Issue is to publish novel research contributing to the development of knowledge about these linkages. We encourage submissions assessing the human rights consequences of state compliance with international rules and agreements promoted by international organizations like the World Bank and IMF, the International Labour Organisation, as well as regional financial as well as intergovernmental organizations like the European Union. We are also interested in how national government pledges through the ratification of core human rights conventions manage the consequences of trade to protect and realise their citizens’ human rights.

Papers can be theoretically or empirically based. Methodologically diverse and/or noteworthy approaches and the reporting of original data are especially welcome. It is intended that this Special Issue will include papers from a wide range of disciplines (e.g., political science, economics, sociology, etc.), and discuss matters that have local and/or global relevance.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. M. Rodwan Abouharb
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • trade
  • human rights
  • international financial institutions
  • intergovernmental organisations
  • World Bank
  • IMF
  • International Labour Organisation
  • European Union

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

21 pages, 505 KiB  
Article
It’s a Hard-Knock Life: Child Labor Practices and Compliance with IMF Agreements
by Brendan Skip Mark, Huei-Jyun Ye, Andrew Foote and Tiffani Crippin
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(5), 171; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10050171 - 14 May 2021
Viewed by 2983
Abstract
How does IMF lending impact child labor? We argue that, as compliance with IMF reforms increases, child labor increases. IMF loans can help governments avoid bankruptcy, prevent debt defaults, and credibly signal a commitment to pro-market reforms which should generate trade and investment. [...] Read more.
How does IMF lending impact child labor? We argue that, as compliance with IMF reforms increases, child labor increases. IMF loans can help governments avoid bankruptcy, prevent debt defaults, and credibly signal a commitment to pro-market reforms which should generate trade and investment. However, IMF policies associated with revenue and social policies can have negative impacts on child labor. Education reforms undermine the quality of schooling, making child labor more likely. Healthcare reforms undermine the quality of healthcare; when parents are ill or injured, their children are more likely to enter the workforce to make up for lost income. Similarly, social safety net reforms reduce the ability of families to access a safety net during times of hardship and make it more likely that children are pushed into the labor market to keep families afloat. To test our argument, we use a control function selection model on a sample of 70 IMF borrowers between 2002 and 2016. Using new datasets on IMF compliance and child labor, we find that increased compliance with IMF reforms worsens child labor practices. Revenue and social policy compliance in particular are associated with an increase in child labor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trade and Human Rights)
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25 pages, 1154 KiB  
Article
Trade and Strike Activity in the Postwar United States
by M. Rodwan Abouharb and Benjamin O. Fordham
Soc. Sci. 2020, 9(11), 198; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9110198 - 31 Oct 2020
Viewed by 3693
Abstract
This paper examines the effect of international trade on strike activity within the United States since World War II. Globalization may influence strike activity through its effects on the bargaining position of labor. Alternatively, if labor and management take their changed bargaining positions [...] Read more.
This paper examines the effect of international trade on strike activity within the United States since World War II. Globalization may influence strike activity through its effects on the bargaining position of labor. Alternatively, if labor and management take their changed bargaining positions into account, the rate of change in openness could create greater uncertainty in negotiations between them and lead to more strikes as a result. Empirical analysis of strike activity in the 50 states over this period supports the argument concerning uncertainty in the bargaining process. Import competition may also indirectly reduce strike activity by decreasing union density. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trade and Human Rights)
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