Special Issue "Race/Ethnicity, Crime and Social Control"

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 September 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Tina G. Patel

University of Salford, School of Health and Society, Allerton Building, Salford M6 6UP, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: ‘race’ and racism; exclusion; victimization; policing and social control; race/ethnic-based hate; violent behaviour

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Inequality and prejudice continues to thrive in society, despite attempts to address race/ethnic-based discrimination. This discrimination has been normalised, made respectable, and presented as necessary, especially considering recent crime incidents that have been problematically constructed as racially/ethnically-based events. This has been done via the use of an othering ‘logic’ and reworked notions of ‘black criminality’. The result is that attempts to control, regulate, and remove some population groups have become a publicly-backed preoccupation of the criminal justice system and its allied security bodies, and have reached levels of heightened concern for human rights advocates.

Submissions are invited for a Special Issue examining “Race/Ethnicity, Crime and Social Control”. The aim of this Special Issue is to critically address this subject, whilst contributing to the development of social scientific understanding into the experiences of minority ethnic groups—especially those considered to be in a heighten hidden, silenced, or vulnerable position. Papers can be theoretically or empirically based. Methodologically diverse and/or noteworthy approaches and the reporting of original data are especially welcome. It is intended that the Special Issue will include papers from a wide range of disciplines (e.g., anthropology, criminology, sociology, race studies, religious and Islamic studies, geography, etc.), and discuss matters that have local and/or global relevance.

Dr. Tina G. Patel
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Social Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Criminalization
  • Criminal justice
  • Identity politics
  • Intersectionality
  • Order and disorder
  • Post-race spaces
  • Race/ethnic othering

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Race/Ethnicity, Crime and Social Control: An Introduction
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(12), 271; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120271
Received: 14 December 2018 / Revised: 14 December 2018 / Accepted: 14 December 2018 / Published: 18 December 2018
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Abstract
As Cornel West (1993) asserted, ‘race matters’ because it has mattered so much and so significantly in the lives of millions of people. [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Race/Ethnicity, Crime and Social Control)

Research

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Open AccessArticle
Noise Complaints between Japanese Neighbors and Migrants in Rural Japan: From the Perspectives of Noisemakers
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(12), 268; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120268
Received: 1 September 2018 / Revised: 11 December 2018 / Accepted: 12 December 2018 / Published: 17 December 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4861 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper focuses on the narratives and embodiment of noisemakers in noise complaints in a small town of rural Japan. By building on the intersection of sound studies, body, and migration, this paper aims to critically address the longstanding concept of ‘noise’ through [...] Read more.
This paper focuses on the narratives and embodiment of noisemakers in noise complaints in a small town of rural Japan. By building on the intersection of sound studies, body, and migration, this paper aims to critically address the longstanding concept of ‘noise’ through the overlooked perspectives of migrants who are perceived as ‘noisemakers’ in the neighbor relations between Japanese neighbors and migrants. This study was conducted through months of fieldwork in a small town in Japan, wherein an ethnic concentration of Japanese descendants from North Sulawesi, Indonesia has been established for almost two decades. Sensory ethnography was adopted in addition to participant observation and in-depth interviews that presented the narratives of five Japanese descendants working in seafood processing factories. The findings suggest that perception of the ‘unwanted’ bodily presence becomes a salient metaphorical sense of ‘noise’ which is embodied in migrants as byproducts of the psychological noise of the hearers. This ‘noise’ evokes series of complaints which also escalate into space control in the neighborhood. More than just neighbor relations in negotiating private–public spaces, the phenomena of noisemaking and noise complaints in this study are layered with overlapping unequal social and power structures concerning neighbors, workers, and migrants with stigma of gaijin and ‘noisemakers’. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Race/Ethnicity, Crime and Social Control)
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Open AccessArticle
The Black Criminal Other as an Object of Social Control
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(11), 234; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7110234
Received: 29 September 2018 / Revised: 21 October 2018 / Accepted: 26 October 2018 / Published: 13 November 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (235 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Throughout this paper, we contend that the ‘gang’ has been appropriated by the state as an ideological device that drives the hypercriminalisation of black, mixed, Asian, and other minority ethnic (BAME) communities. Drawing upon two research studies, we demonstrate how the gang is [...] Read more.
Throughout this paper, we contend that the ‘gang’ has been appropriated by the state as an ideological device that drives the hypercriminalisation of black, mixed, Asian, and other minority ethnic (BAME) communities. Drawing upon two research studies, we demonstrate how the gang is evoked to explain an array of contemporary ‘crime’ problems, which in turn (re)produces racialised objects to be policed. With particular reference to collective punishments, we suggest that “gang-branding” is critical to the development of guilt-producing associations that facilitate the arrest, charging, and prosecution of countless numbers of BAME people for offences they did not commit. As such, there is now an urgent need to ‘take seriously’ the criminalising intents of a dangerous criminology of the Other, which legitimises intrusive racist policing and surveillance, and justifies the imposition of deliberate harms upon racialised communities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Race/Ethnicity, Crime and Social Control)
Open AccessArticle
Black and Minority Ethnic Boys and Custody in England and Wales: Understanding Subjective Experiences through an Analysis of Official Data
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(11), 226; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7110226
Received: 12 September 2018 / Revised: 2 November 2018 / Accepted: 3 November 2018 / Published: 8 November 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1189 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Recent years have seen a dramatic shift in youth justice outcomes and a fall in the number of children drawn into the youth justice system in England and Wales. However, it appears that children from some backgrounds have not benefited as much as [...] Read more.
Recent years have seen a dramatic shift in youth justice outcomes and a fall in the number of children drawn into the youth justice system in England and Wales. However, it appears that children from some backgrounds have not benefited as much as others from this change. There is a wealth of academic literature on processes of criminalisation, policies, and practices of youth justice and the experiences of children, particularly boys, in custody. However, there is little detailed understanding of how these processes, policies, and practices affect children from different backgrounds. This paper examines the most intrusive aspect of youth justice, namely, custodial sentences. Through an examination of the Inspectorate of Prisons’ reports and associated surveys, this paper seeks to explore black and minority ethnic boys’ perceptions of their experiences of custody. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Race/Ethnicity, Crime and Social Control)
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Open AccessArticle
‘If Your Hair Is Relaxed, White People Are Relaxed. If Your Hair Is Nappy, They’re Not Happy’: Black Hair as a Site of ‘Post-Racial’ Social Control in English Schools
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(11), 219; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7110219
Received: 4 September 2018 / Revised: 18 October 2018 / Accepted: 28 October 2018 / Published: 1 November 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (312 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A growing body of literature examines how social control is embedded within, and enacted through, key social institutions generally, and how it impacts disproportionately upon racially minoritised people specifically. Despite this, little attention has been given to the minutiae of these forms of [...] Read more.
A growing body of literature examines how social control is embedded within, and enacted through, key social institutions generally, and how it impacts disproportionately upon racially minoritised people specifically. Despite this, little attention has been given to the minutiae of these forms of social control. Centring Black hair as a site of social control, and using a contemporary case study to illustrate, this article argues that it is through such forms of routine discipline that conditions of white supremacy are maintained and perpetuated. Whilst our entry into a ‘post-racial’ epoch means school policies are generally thought of as race-neutral or ‘colorblind’, we draw attention to how they (re)produce and normalise surface-level manifestations of anti-Blackness. Situating Black hair as a form of ‘racial symbolism’ and showing Black hairstyles to be significant to Black youth, we show that the governance of hair is not neutral but instead, acts as a form of social control that valorises whiteness and pathologises Blackness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Race/Ethnicity, Crime and Social Control)
Open AccessArticle
Islamophobia in Australia: From Far-Right Deplorables to Respectable Liberals
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(11), 213; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7110213
Received: 13 September 2018 / Revised: 15 October 2018 / Accepted: 27 October 2018 / Published: 30 October 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (288 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In Australia since about the turn of the millennium, discrimination against Muslims has been increasingly normalized, made respectable, and presented as prudent precaution against violent extremism. Vilification of Muslims has posed as defending ‘Australian values’ against those who will not integrate. Liberal political [...] Read more.
In Australia since about the turn of the millennium, discrimination against Muslims has been increasingly normalized, made respectable, and presented as prudent precaution against violent extremism. Vilification of Muslims has posed as defending ‘Australian values’ against those who will not integrate. Liberal political leaders and press leader-writers who formerly espoused cultural pluralism now routinely hold up as inimical the Muslim folk devil by whose otherness the boundaries of acceptability of the national culture may be marked out and policed. The Muslim Other is positioned not only as culturally incommensurate, but dangerously so: dishonest, criminally inclined, violent, misogynist, homophobic, backward, uncivilized. On the far right, extremist nationalist organizations incite racist hatred under cover of this rhetoric, often cloaked as reasonable common sense. This paper undertakes an ideology analysis of political and media discussion, and examines the forms of social control that they advance and sustain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Race/Ethnicity, Crime and Social Control)
Open AccessArticle
Housing Discrimination and Health: Understanding Potential Linking Pathways Using a Mixed-Methods Approach
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(10), 194; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7100194
Received: 15 September 2018 / Revised: 8 October 2018 / Accepted: 9 October 2018 / Published: 12 October 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (770 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Few studies have examined the impact of housing discrimination on health. This study explores potential pathways linking housing discrimination and health using concept mapping, a mixed-method approach. Participants included employees from twenty Fair Housing Organizations nationwide who participated in two online sessions, brainstorming, [...] Read more.
Few studies have examined the impact of housing discrimination on health. This study explores potential pathways linking housing discrimination and health using concept mapping, a mixed-method approach. Participants included employees from twenty Fair Housing Organizations nationwide who participated in two online sessions, brainstorming, and structuring. Responses were generated representing biological, social, economic, and physical connections between housing discrimination and health. Using hierarchical cluster analysis, five clusters were identified: (1) Access and barriers; (2) Opportunities for growth; (3) Neighborhood and communities; (4) Physical effects of housing discrimination; and (5) Mental health. Clusters 1 (4.09) and 2 (4.08) were rated as most important for health, while clusters 2 (3.93) and 3 (3.90) were rated as most frequently occurring. These findings add to the limited evidence connecting housing discrimination to health and highlight the need for studies focusing on the long-term health effects of housing discrimination on individuals and neighborhoods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Race/Ethnicity, Crime and Social Control)
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Open AccessArticle
Do Police Officers in the USA Protect and Serve All Citizens Equally?
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(10), 190; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7100190
Received: 2 September 2018 / Revised: 26 September 2018 / Accepted: 8 October 2018 / Published: 9 October 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (210 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Survey research has clarified the extent to which racial minorities and majority white Americans disagree about whether police should be trusted. Racial minorities are generally far more suspicious of the police officers who serve their communities. Other forms of evidence would appear to [...] Read more.
Survey research has clarified the extent to which racial minorities and majority white Americans disagree about whether police should be trusted. Racial minorities are generally far more suspicious of the police officers who serve their communities. Other forms of evidence would appear to corroborate the views of minority citizens in the USA. This requires scholars and others interested in policing to think about reforms that may create a fairer system of law enforcement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Race/Ethnicity, Crime and Social Control)
Open AccessArticle
The Effects of Poverty and Prison on British Muslim Men Who Offend
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(10), 184; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7100184
Received: 16 August 2018 / Revised: 20 September 2018 / Accepted: 26 September 2018 / Published: 2 October 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (251 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Focusing on the lives of British Muslim young men, this article examines the links between their social and economic relations and their prison experiences, desistance, and identity. In understanding the meanings they place on their prison experiences and their social and economic marginalization, [...] Read more.
Focusing on the lives of British Muslim young men, this article examines the links between their social and economic relations and their prison experiences, desistance, and identity. In understanding the meanings they place on their prison experiences and their social and economic marginalization, the article theorises about social integration, and their place in British society. An intergenerational shift from the availability of local high-waged, skilled, and secure textile work to low-waged, precarious, service work presented them with a series of problems and opportunities, leading them to reject licit wage labour and embrace illicit entrepreneurial criminality. The article concludes that their social and economic relations drove criminal solutions, not ethnicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Race/Ethnicity, Crime and Social Control)
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