Special Issue "Race/Ethnicity, Crime and Social Control"

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 September 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Tina G. Patel

University of Salford, School of Health and Society, Allerton Building, Salford M6 6UP, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: ‘race’ and racism; exclusion; victimization; policing and social control; race/ethnic-based hate; violent behaviour

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Inequality and prejudice continues to thrive in society, despite attempts to address race/ethnic-based discrimination. This discrimination has been normalised, made respectable, and presented as necessary, especially considering recent crime incidents that have been problematically constructed as racially/ethnically-based events. This has been done via the use of an othering ‘logic’ and reworked notions of ‘black criminality’. The result is that attempts to control, regulate, and remove some population groups have become a publicly-backed preoccupation of the criminal justice system and its allied security bodies, and have reached levels of heightened concern for human rights advocates.

Submissions are invited for a Special Issue examining “Race/Ethnicity, Crime and Social Control”. The aim of this Special Issue is to critically address this subject, whilst contributing to the development of social scientific understanding into the experiences of minority ethnic groups—especially those considered to be in a heighten hidden, silenced, or vulnerable position. Papers can be theoretically or empirically based. Methodologically diverse and/or noteworthy approaches and the reporting of original data are especially welcome. It is intended that the Special Issue will include papers from a wide range of disciplines (e.g., anthropology, criminology, sociology, race studies, religious and Islamic studies, geography, etc.), and discuss matters that have local and/or global relevance.

Dr. Tina G. Patel
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Social Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Criminalization
  • Criminal justice
  • Identity politics
  • Intersectionality
  • Order and disorder
  • Post-race spaces
  • Race/ethnic othering

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Housing Discrimination and Health: Understanding Potential Linking Pathways Using a Mixed-Methods Approach
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(10), 194; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7100194
Received: 15 September 2018 / Revised: 8 October 2018 / Accepted: 9 October 2018 / Published: 12 October 2018
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Abstract
Few studies have examined the impact of housing discrimination on health. This study explores potential pathways linking housing discrimination and health using concept mapping, a mixed-method approach. Participants included employees from twenty Fair Housing Organizations nationwide who participated in two online sessions, brainstorming,
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Few studies have examined the impact of housing discrimination on health. This study explores potential pathways linking housing discrimination and health using concept mapping, a mixed-method approach. Participants included employees from twenty Fair Housing Organizations nationwide who participated in two online sessions, brainstorming, and structuring. Responses were generated representing biological, social, economic, and physical connections between housing discrimination and health. Using hierarchical cluster analysis, five clusters were identified: (1) Access and barriers; (2) Opportunities for growth; (3) Neighborhood and communities; (4) Physical effects of housing discrimination; and (5) Mental health. Clusters 1 (4.09) and 2 (4.08) were rated as most important for health, while clusters 2 (3.93) and 3 (3.90) were rated as most frequently occurring. These findings add to the limited evidence connecting housing discrimination to health and highlight the need for studies focusing on the long-term health effects of housing discrimination on individuals and neighborhoods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Race/Ethnicity, Crime and Social Control)
Figures

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Open AccessArticle Do Police Officers in the USA Protect and Serve All Citizens Equally?
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(10), 190; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7100190
Received: 2 September 2018 / Revised: 26 September 2018 / Accepted: 8 October 2018 / Published: 9 October 2018
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Abstract
Survey research has clarified the extent to which racial minorities and majority white Americans disagree about whether police should be trusted. Racial minorities are generally far more suspicious of the police officers who serve their communities. Other forms of evidence would appear to
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Survey research has clarified the extent to which racial minorities and majority white Americans disagree about whether police should be trusted. Racial minorities are generally far more suspicious of the police officers who serve their communities. Other forms of evidence would appear to corroborate the views of minority citizens in the USA. This requires scholars and others interested in policing to think about reforms that may create a fairer system of law enforcement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Race/Ethnicity, Crime and Social Control)
Open AccessArticle The Effects of Poverty and Prison on British Muslim Men Who Offend
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(10), 184; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7100184
Received: 16 August 2018 / Revised: 20 September 2018 / Accepted: 26 September 2018 / Published: 2 October 2018
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Abstract
Focusing on the lives of British Muslim young men, this article examines the links between their social and economic relations and their prison experiences, desistance, and identity. In understanding the meanings they place on their prison experiences and their social and economic marginalization,
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Focusing on the lives of British Muslim young men, this article examines the links between their social and economic relations and their prison experiences, desistance, and identity. In understanding the meanings they place on their prison experiences and their social and economic marginalization, the article theorises about social integration, and their place in British society. An intergenerational shift from the availability of local high-waged, skilled, and secure textile work to low-waged, precarious, service work presented them with a series of problems and opportunities, leading them to reject licit wage labour and embrace illicit entrepreneurial criminality. The article concludes that their social and economic relations drove criminal solutions, not ethnicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Race/Ethnicity, Crime and Social Control)
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