Special Issue "New Methods for the Measurement of Quality-of-Life (QOL)/Subjective Well-Being (SWB)"

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 December 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Christian Weismayer

Department of Sustainability, Governance, and Methods, MODUL University Vienna, Am Kahlenberg 1, 1190 Vienna, Austria
Website | E-Mail
Interests: quantitative methods; quality-of-life (QOL); subjective-well being (SWB); life satisfaction (LS); happiness
Co-Guest Editor
Prof. Ivo Ponocny

Department of Sustainability, Governance, and Methods, MODUL University Vienna, Am Kahlenberg 1, 1190 Vienna, Austria
Website | E-Mail
Interests: social psychology; statistics, mixed-methods; quality-of-life (QoL); subjective wellbeing (SWB)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the last few decades, a huge debate arose from the question of whether the primary goal of a country should be, first and foremost, economic in nature. This ongoing discussion has intensified since the emergence of “The Stiglitz Report”. These days, it defines its main objective in the increase of quality-of-life (QOL) and subjective well-being (SWB). This research stream becomes broader and broader and a tremendous number of different scientific topics play their role for the progress of the same. These diversified influences logically lead at the same time to a broader range of measurement techniques used to quantify QOL and SWB respectively. Technological advancements will play one of the dominant roles in the future, as more and more information can be processed, as well as new sorts of information showing up in this respect.

We welcome a broad range of empirical contributions that deal with new methods based on all kinds of data, be they numerical, textual, biometric, pictorial, acoustic, etc., and look forward for creative contributions to the field of QoL, as well as SWB measurement techniques.

Dr. Christian Weismayer
Prof. Ivo Ponocny
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Social Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charges (APCs) of 350 CHF (Swiss Francs) per published paper are partially funded by institutions through Knowledge Unlatched for a limited number of papers per year. Please contact the editorial office before submission to check whether KU waivers, or discounts are still available. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Quality-of-Life (QoL)
  • Subjective Well-Being (SWB)
  • Life Satisfaction
  • Happiness
  • Quantitative Measurement

Published Papers (1 paper)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-1
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Subjective Happiness, Health and Quality of Life and Their Sociocultural Correlates among Younger Population in Malawi
Soc. Sci. 2019, 8(2), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci8020055
Received: 8 December 2018 / Revised: 2 February 2019 / Accepted: 12 February 2019 / Published: 15 February 2019
PDF Full-text (965 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Public health research and policy in sub-Saharan Africa are generally disease-oriented, with the focus being largely confined within the biological determinants of health. So far, little attention has been given to developing a more health-oriented approach by emphasising the psychosocial dimensions of health, [...] Read more.
Public health research and policy in sub-Saharan Africa are generally disease-oriented, with the focus being largely confined within the biological determinants of health. So far, little attention has been given to developing a more health-oriented approach by emphasising the psychosocial dimensions of health, especially among the younger population. To this regard, we conducted the present study to assess the prevalence and sociocultural correlates of perceived happiness, health, and life satisfaction among the adolescent and young (15–24 years) population in Malawi. We analysed cross-sectional data on 12,610 men and women based on a Malawi multiple indicator cluster survey conducted in 2013–2014. Data were analysed using descriptive and multivariable regression methods. According to the findings, more than 80% of the men and women reported being satisfied about happiness, health, and life. Multivariate analysis showed an inverse relationship between being currently or formerly married and perceived happiness. Ethnic disparities in perceived health and happiness were more pronounced in men, whereas that of life satisfaction was more pronounced in women. Living in households of the highest wealth quintile was positively associated with health and life satisfaction, but not with happiness. These findings highlight the need for prioritising the psychosocial needs of the adolescent and youth populations in designing health and social policy in Malawi. The findings need to be interpreted in light of the factors specific to the sociocultural environment in Malawi. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Soc. Sci. EISSN 2076-0760 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top