Special Issue "Labor Unions and the Changing Employment Relationships"

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2019)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Raymond Gibney

School of Business Administration Business Administration Graduate Faculty, Penn State University at Harrisburg, Middletown, PA 17057, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Employee-employer relationship; Labor unions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Across the globe, changing employment relationships impinge on the role of labor unions. The legal definition of an employee is subject to increasing debate as the ties between workers and hiring organizations become more tenuous. A variety of employment relationships are subsumed under the emerging “gig” economy to encompass contracted workers, temps, part-timers, and seasonal employees. Managing employment relationships grows more complicated within multinational firms that must comply with different legal requirements and societal expectations across national and continental boundaries. Representing workers also becomes even more challenging in this midst of shifting economic, legal, and social terrain. The costs and benefits of union representation may vary across different employment arrangements, and the legal protections afforded to workers may differ as well depending on their connection to hiring organizations. We explore the nature and scope of the changing employment relationships within and between countries and examine the implications they have for the role of unions in society, both in terms of workplace and political representation.

Dr. Raymond Gibney
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • labor union
  • employment relationship

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Job Crafting among Labor Union Representatives: Its Impact on Work Engagement and Job Satisfaction
Soc. Sci. 2019, 8(1), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci8010020
Received: 15 November 2018 / Revised: 5 January 2019 / Accepted: 8 January 2019 / Published: 11 January 2019
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Abstract
Labor Union activity still lacks recognition as an ordinary work activity. However, on the one hand, labor union representatives must deal with many tasks (internal and external) that can sometimes be overwhelming. On the other hand, given its vocational nature and the possibility [...] Read more.
Labor Union activity still lacks recognition as an ordinary work activity. However, on the one hand, labor union representatives must deal with many tasks (internal and external) that can sometimes be overwhelming. On the other hand, given its vocational nature and the possibility that it offers for the workers themselves to organize their work, the area of trade unionism can be interesting for the study of job crafting and other phenomena associated with well-being, such as burnout or work engagement. Unfortunately, to date, there are no investigations that address these phenomena, especially job crafting in the labor union environment. Therefore, the objective of the present study is to explore the existing relationships between the job crafting of the labor union representatives and their well-being and health. A sample of 78 participants engaged in labor union activity for an average of 12.62 years completed job satisfaction and work engagement measures. The results indicate that job crafting dimensions predicted participants’ job satisfaction and engagement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Labor Unions and the Changing Employment Relationships)
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Open AccessArticle “I Know I Am, But What Are You?”: Public Perceptions of Unions, Members and Joining Intentions
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(9), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7090146
Received: 23 July 2018 / Revised: 17 August 2018 / Accepted: 28 August 2018 / Published: 31 August 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (208 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Respondent’s perceptions of demographic, social and behavioral characteristics of union members were analyzed in comparison to the statistical data regarding union members. Respondents also provided perceptions regarding unions themselves as well as future joining intentions. Overall, respondents accurately identified some characteristics of union [...] Read more.
Respondent’s perceptions of demographic, social and behavioral characteristics of union members were analyzed in comparison to the statistical data regarding union members. Respondents also provided perceptions regarding unions themselves as well as future joining intentions. Overall, respondents accurately identified some characteristics of union members and were incorrect on others. General union image was poor as well as future joining intentions. The results of this analysis suggest that union density declines in the private sector will continue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Labor Unions and the Changing Employment Relationships)
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