Special Issue "Asian Perspectives on Active Aging: Meaning, Purpose and Hope"

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021) | Viewed by 14512

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Kalyani Kirtikar Mehta
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Gerontology and Social Work, Singapore University of Social Sciences, Singapore 599494, Singapore
Interests: policies relating to ageing society and implications; retirement; productive ageing; spirituality and ageing; caregiving issues; senior voluntarism
Dr. Leng Leng Thang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences National University of Singapore, Singapore 117570, Singapore
Interests: east asian society and culture; intergenerational programming; intergenerational relationships; aging (active aging, retirement and migration, caregiving, senior volunteerism); family; gender

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue focuses on the value of active ageing and its beneficial impact on mental and physical health. The theme of this issue “Asian Perspectives on Active Aging: meaning, purpose and hope.” has the aim of portraying the concept of active aging from multidisciplinary angles. We invite papers from Asia. The aim of the special issue is to collate the various experiences and interpretations of active ageing from diverse facets i.e. physical, social, intellectual, spiritual and cultural in the rich context of Asia. Asia is a vast region characterized by ethnic, religious, language and cultural diversities. The special issue will illustrate the many manifestations of active ageing according to the context and the authentic identities of the people concerned.

From the research perspective, the authors are requested to link the expression (s) of active ageing to the context i.e. national, cultural, geographical and historical and the authentic identities of the people i.e. religion, history, health beliefs and spiritual tendencies. This will contribute towards the stock of knowledge that exists at present on how active ageing is conceptualized. Each paper will also add to the understanding of how the different activities and practices add meaning and purpose in later life in the local context. The meaning, purpose and hope (or desired outcome) of the active ageing pursuits should be discussed and clearly elucidated in the papers.

Abstract submission (200 words) by 10 March 2021

Please submit your abstract and any questions to special issue guest editors, Professor Kalyani Kirtikar Mehta ([email protected]) and Dr. Leng Leng Thang ([email protected]).

Full paper submission (approximate 8000 words) by 31 August 2021

Revisions may be required after the editors’ respond to the full papers. A short timeline for revisions is planned such as 2–3 weeks. Each paper will then go through blinded peer reviews before final acceptance.

Prof. Dr. Kalyani Kirtikar Mehta
Dr. Leng Leng Thang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Social Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ageing
  • active
  • seniors
  • Asia
  • elderly

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
The Introduction of the Special Issue: Asian Perspectives on Active Aging: Meaning, Purpose and Hope
Soc. Sci. 2022, 11(5), 190; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci11050190 - 26 Apr 2022
Viewed by 1399
Abstract
This Special Issue focuses on the value of active ageing and its beneficial impact on mental and physical health [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Asian Perspectives on Active Aging: Meaning, Purpose and Hope)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Article
The Past, Present and Future Direction of Government-Supported Active Aging Initiatives in Japan: A Work in Progress
Soc. Sci. 2022, 11(2), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci11020065 - 09 Feb 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1895
Abstract
Active aging programs are seen as an important strategy for the long-term sustainability of Japan given population aging and fertility decline trends. This paper reviews Japan’s commitment to active aging initiatives since the 1960s with a focus on the development of senior clubs, [...] Read more.
Active aging programs are seen as an important strategy for the long-term sustainability of Japan given population aging and fertility decline trends. This paper reviews Japan’s commitment to active aging initiatives since the 1960s with a focus on the development of senior clubs, welfare centers for the elderly and senior colleges. The changing patterns of their popularity are discussed in relation to the increased options available today and the changes taking place in the family structure with both a macro historical review and a case study to demonstrate how programs have been implemented with national and local funding support. A description of the U.S. experience is used to demonstrate the comparative level of commitment that Japan has made to support healthy aging. The recrafting of the active aging motif as shogai gen’eki, with its emphasis on continued employment, may suggest a redirection of the preferred role of Japan’s older adults in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Asian Perspectives on Active Aging: Meaning, Purpose and Hope)
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Article
Relicensing Practices of Taxi Drivers and Crane Operators Aged 70 Years and above in Singapore
Soc. Sci. 2022, 11(2), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci11020041 - 25 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1579
Abstract
Singapore is a rapidly ageing society, underpinned by national policies to promote successful and active ageing. Whilst older worker participation in the workforce is encouraged, policymakers are challenged to ensure that work competency is not compromised with any normal age- and/or health-related changes. [...] Read more.
Singapore is a rapidly ageing society, underpinned by national policies to promote successful and active ageing. Whilst older worker participation in the workforce is encouraged, policymakers are challenged to ensure that work competency is not compromised with any normal age- and/or health-related changes. This paper will briefly outline how policymakers responded to the needs of two subgroups of older workers aged 70 years and above (taxi drivers; crane operators) who desire to continue working in the last two decades. Whilst a mandatory retirement age policy exists for older taxi drivers in Singapore, there is none for older crane operators. Despite this, stricter relicensing protocols were introduced for both types of workers, with active collaboration involving additional occupational therapy services for functional work competency assessments to complement the routine medical fitness screening. Comparisons will be made of these two relicensing frameworks, including the mention of any relevant studies to align with the call of evidence-based practices. In mid-2020, the relicensing policy for older taxi drivers was revised based on findings of a retrospective national database study. Currently, a 4-year national database study on older crane operators aged 70 years and above is being undertaken with preliminary findings to be reported. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Asian Perspectives on Active Aging: Meaning, Purpose and Hope)
Article
Meaningful Aging: A Relational Conceptualization, Intervention, and Its Impacts
Soc. Sci. 2022, 11(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci11010010 - 27 Dec 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1779
Abstract
Having a meaningful life is one of the most important goals among older adults. This paper provided an overview of a programme of research and practice on meaningful aging among older Chinese adults. It firstly describes the process of developing and validating a [...] Read more.
Having a meaningful life is one of the most important goals among older adults. This paper provided an overview of a programme of research and practice on meaningful aging among older Chinese adults. It firstly describes the process of developing and validating a relational conceptualization of a meaningful life (i.e., spiritual well-being) among older Chinese adults from its conceptual roots, development, and validation process since 2009 through an academic–community collaboration. In brief, a meaningful life was attributed to five relationships centered on older adults: the relationship with self, relationship with family, relationship with friends, relationship with people other than family and friends, and relationship with the environment. Secondly, the paper explains a validated assessment tool (e.g., the Spirituality Scale for Chinese Elders, (SSCE)) that was developed accordingly. Evidence-based stratified interventions derived from the conceptualization and operationalization were then introduced including a professionally led group intervention protocol, a volunteer-partner intervention protocol, and a self-help-oriented intervention, which shared eight-session core contents. Good practices in applying various interventions among older adults with diversified backgrounds (e.g., health status, age, and gender) and various service settings (e.g., community, long-term care facilities, and home visits) were then synthesized. Thirdly, feedback from stakeholders is illustrated, and good practices are discussed. In conclusion, a culturally sensitive and meaningful aging framework is timely and impactful for the globally aging world. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Asian Perspectives on Active Aging: Meaning, Purpose and Hope)
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Article
Active Aging through Later Life and Afterlife Planning: Shūkatsu in a Super-Aged Japan
Soc. Sci. 2022, 11(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci11010003 - 22 Dec 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2099
Abstract
In Japan, the term shūkatsu—referred as the planning for later life and for the afterlife—has gained popularity due to high amount of mass media exposure in recent years. This paper examines shūkatsu from the active aging framework, contending that shūkatsu is an [...] Read more.
In Japan, the term shūkatsu—referred as the planning for later life and for the afterlife—has gained popularity due to high amount of mass media exposure in recent years. This paper examines shūkatsu from the active aging framework, contending that shūkatsu is an important activity that contributes to active aging, as the process of conscientious planning encourages older Japanese people to remain active. Data for this study were obtained from qualitative interviews that were conducted with 40 older middle-class Japanese citizens residing in Nagoya. Explored through a life course perspective, the study examined how salient factors, such as personal history, experiences, roles, anxieties, life-changing events, and cultural practices, have influenced older Japanese people in their shūkatsu decision-making process. In the process of understanding how the Japanese respond to changing family relationships and sociocultural transformations, the emphasis on living a “good old age” for better social, psychological, and physical well-being strongly reflects the agency to age actively. In a super-aged Japan, shūkatsu may be a vital strategy that not only ensures a better quality of life for the older population and their children, but it also contributes to individual’s sense of usefulness and satisfaction, as they are actively involved in the planning and management of their own later and afterlife choices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Asian Perspectives on Active Aging: Meaning, Purpose and Hope)
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Article
Pension and Active Ageing: Lessons Learned from Civil Servants in Indonesia
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(11), 436; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10110436 - 15 Nov 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1793
Abstract
Many developing countries are currently facing an ageing population without sufficient preparation for old-age financial adequacy, an important component in active ageing. One question is whether a pension system can create old-age financial adequacy. At the same time, many countries are shifting their [...] Read more.
Many developing countries are currently facing an ageing population without sufficient preparation for old-age financial adequacy, an important component in active ageing. One question is whether a pension system can create old-age financial adequacy. At the same time, many countries are shifting their pension systems from a defined benefit to a defined contribution pension system to improve the welfare of older people while maintaining state budget sustainability. Indonesia is not an exception. This paper learns from civil servants in Indonesia, where the retirement payout from the existing pay-as-you-go, defined benefit system is meagre. The system is to be transformed into a defined contribution one. Using a simulation method, this paper examines whether the proposed system will provide a better retirement payout, which is higher than the minimum wage and will allow retirees to maintain their pre-retirement income. This paper concludes that the proposed system alone is not sufficient to create old-age financial adequacy and, therefore, is less able to contribute to active ageing. To improve the retirement payout, among other things, the retirement age should be raised and made optional, and the accumulated savings should be re-invested during the retirement period. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Asian Perspectives on Active Aging: Meaning, Purpose and Hope)
Article
Discourse of Folk Literature on Healthy Ageing: A Case Study in Sindh, Pakistan during the Pandemic Crisis
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(9), 350; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10090350 - 20 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2865
Abstract
Due to COVID-19 and the repeated imposition of lockdowns in Pakistan’s Sindh province, the life of senior citizens has become challenging. Given the scarcity of health care policies targeted at Sindh’s aged persons, the use of folk literature as therapy has increased to [...] Read more.
Due to COVID-19 and the repeated imposition of lockdowns in Pakistan’s Sindh province, the life of senior citizens has become challenging. Given the scarcity of health care policies targeted at Sindh’s aged persons, the use of folk literature as therapy has increased to support against isolation, depression, and distress caused by COVID-19 and lockdowns. Although research on healthy ageing from medical and health care perspectives has been increasingly conducted in different contexts, there is a need to explore how folk literature can contribute to psychological, spiritual, and social wellbeing. Therefore, this research, conducted by collecting data from 15 aged participants through interviews and conversations, seeks to explore how senior Sindhis have used folk literature such as poetry, proverbs, and tales as therapy for their healing. Findings show that the participants’ use of Sindhi folk literature contributes to their psychological (eudemonic, evaluative, and hedonic) wellbeing, spiritual healing, and social satisfaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Asian Perspectives on Active Aging: Meaning, Purpose and Hope)
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