Special Issue "Selected Papers from the 9th Slovenian Social Science Conference on “Social Transformations: The Global and the Local”"

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Matej Makarovič

School of Advanced Social Studies, Gregorčičeva 19, SI-5000 Nova Gorica, Slovenia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: social change; identities; Europe; political sociology; sociological theory

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will house a selection of papers prepared for, and presented at, the 9th Slovenian Social Science Conference on “Social Transformations: The Global and the Local” The conference is organized by the Slovenian National Committee of the UNESCO Management of Social Transformations Program (MOST), the Junior Sociological Network of the International Sociological Association, and the School of Advanced Social Studies (Fakulteta za uporabne družbene študije), which will take place in Ljubljana, Slovenia, 21–23 September, 2017.

A broad variety of social transformations, taking place from the local to the global level, have made people and social systems, on the one hand, more interconnected and interdependent, and on the other hand, more divided. Moreover, people’s positions in social structures and their perceptions are characterized by very large differences and inequalities. Some are able to enter transnational social spaces and/or benefit from transnational flows and exchanges, enjoying the opportunities of emerging social orders. Others are—or feel—excluded from these processes, and are confined to the local/national level. Not only are they not able to enjoy or even see the potential gains from transnational interdependencies, they may even look at them with scepticism and fear. Many of them may, thus, feel safer when hidden behind newly-established, strict, national border controls, fences and walls. The aim of the conference is to embrace a variety of issues reflecting the connections and divisions, relating them to local and global frameworks. It welcomes a wide range of theoretical and/or empirical approaches towards the issues and, thus, aims to encourage interdisciplinary debates and also seeks practical suggestions in terms of policy recommendations for decision makers.

Prof. Dr. Matej Makarovič
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • globalization
  • localization
  • interdependence
  • transnationalism
  • inequality
  • exclusion
  • xenophobia

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Student Mobility and Transnational Social Ties as Factors of Reflexivity
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(3), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7030046
Received: 29 October 2017 / Revised: 12 March 2018 / Accepted: 13 March 2018 / Published: 16 March 2018
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Abstract
The article seeks to develop and apply new quantitative measurement instruments capable of significantly improving understanding of the relationship between the transnational mobility and transnational social ties of students, along with their reflexive capacities. With a focus on students building their personal networks, [...] Read more.
The article seeks to develop and apply new quantitative measurement instruments capable of significantly improving understanding of the relationship between the transnational mobility and transnational social ties of students, along with their reflexive capacities. With a focus on students building their personal networks, educational and professional activities that extend beyond the nation’s borders and organising their day-to-day routines in transnational social spaces, we analyse the role of mobility in their reflexive capacities. Applying a tool that is line with Archer’s theory and indicators to measure reflexivity, and transnational social ties as proposed by Molina et al., we analyse data collected via an on-line survey questionnaire administered to Slovenian students. In addition, students from the Middle East (Lebanon) and the USA (Hawai’i) are added for comparative purposes. The results of path analysis show the Slovenian students’ mobility as such implies higher scores for meta reflexivity, combined with lower scores for communicative and fractured reflexivity. Further, social transactions reaching beyond one’s physical localities in terms of transnational social ties implies they have higher levels of reflexivity in general. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Modeling and Evaluation of the Possibilities of Forming a Regional Industrial Symbiosis Networks
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7010013
Received: 31 October 2017 / Revised: 8 January 2018 / Accepted: 8 January 2018 / Published: 17 January 2018
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Abstract
Industrial symbiosis (IS) is a term used to describe a network of diverse organizations that make use of different byproducts to improve their ability to achieve common goals, improve environmental conditions, and/or improve business and technical processes. In this paper, we propose a [...] Read more.
Industrial symbiosis (IS) is a term used to describe a network of diverse organizations that make use of different byproducts to improve their ability to achieve common goals, improve environmental conditions, and/or improve business and technical processes. In this paper, we propose a model for evaluation of the possibilities of the establishment of such IS on a regional level. This paper studied a benchmark of seven IS examples, which are used to build a qualitative multi-criteria decision model for evaluation of the development of IS network model. Through these examples, where two are the best known IS cases in the world, we demonstrate the importance of social actors’ involvement in IS in their industrial or non-industrial technological processes. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Greece’s Economic and Social Transformation 2008–2017
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7010009
Received: 11 October 2017 / Revised: 27 December 2017 / Accepted: 1 January 2018 / Published: 6 January 2018
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Abstract
Greece has confronted serious financial problems since 2008 when the global financial crisis reached its peak. The disturbance in the markets led to an unprecedented local debt crisis, which has lasted till now. The scope of this research is to examine how the [...] Read more.
Greece has confronted serious financial problems since 2008 when the global financial crisis reached its peak. The disturbance in the markets led to an unprecedented local debt crisis, which has lasted till now. The scope of this research is to examine how the crisis affected the local transformation of the society from 2008 to 2017. For this purpose, the paper made secondary analysis of previous data, reports, articles, as well as other relevant information on basic economic and social factors such as GDP, income per capita, unemployment, social exclusion, poverty and homelessness. Despite the fact that three International Economic Programmes have been adopted by the Greek governments, the country still fights for its financial stability. Furthermore, the consequences of crisis were devastating in society. The state countermeasures have triggered a surge in unemployment, emigration, poverty and exclusion, especially among youngsters. In addition, major national economic and social indicators have significantly worsened. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Casino Business in the Context of Tourism Development (Case: Montenegro)
Soc. Sci. 2017, 6(4), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci6040146
Received: 15 October 2017 / Revised: 17 November 2017 / Accepted: 22 November 2017 / Published: 30 November 2017
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Abstract
Special Interest tourism (SIT) represents an answer to mass tourism and its goal is to ensure tourist destination sustainability. The casino industry is growing intensively in the territory of Montenegro and a question arises whether casino tourism development is an opportunity or a [...] Read more.
Special Interest tourism (SIT) represents an answer to mass tourism and its goal is to ensure tourist destination sustainability. The casino industry is growing intensively in the territory of Montenegro and a question arises whether casino tourism development is an opportunity or a danger for Montenegro and its sustainability. The goals of this paper are to show and assess the current offerings and potential for development of casino tourism in Montenegro, to point out advantages and challenges in development of casino tourism in this type of destination. Econometric models were used for the needs of this paper (time series correlations and regression for defining relation between casino business and tourism, ARIMA model for prognosis of casino business in the context of tourism until 2020). For the first time in the territory of Montenegro, 14 anonymous interviews were carried out with casino players to determine the quality of current offerings for development of casino tourism in Montenegro. The main finding suggests that casino tourism in Montenegro is not sufficiently developed, but that we can boast of a high-quality casino offering such as Slovenia. Limitations lie in the lack of data over a long period and the non-existence of the records on number of casino tourists in Montenegro. The emphasis is put on the economic effects of developing casino tourism, rather than the social ones. Full article
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Open AccessCommentary
Indigenous Studies Speaks to American Sociology: The Need for Individual and Social Transformations of Indigenous Education in the USA
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7010001
Received: 31 October 2017 / Revised: 9 December 2017 / Accepted: 18 December 2017 / Published: 21 December 2017
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Abstract
Despite legislation to increase educational success for racial and ethnic minorities in the USA, educational disparities persist. I examine this trend among Indigenous peoples in the state of Oregon, but extend it to education systems across the USA. In Oregon, American Indians have [...] Read more.
Despite legislation to increase educational success for racial and ethnic minorities in the USA, educational disparities persist. I examine this trend among Indigenous peoples in the state of Oregon, but extend it to education systems across the USA. In Oregon, American Indians have the poorest educational attainment of all racial and ethnic groups; only 55% of American Indians graduate on time. I examine this problem from a critical sociological perspective, answering the call for sociology to end its “complicity in the elimination of the native”. I argue education systems are extensions of settler colonial logics and power structures. I propose educational transformations built upon Indigenous cultural teachings, advocating that we follow an Indigenous educational framework that has as its foundation: (1) Indigenous elders’ instructions that education should teach us to be “real human beings”; (2) Indigenous teachings that invite us to engage in reflexivity to understand the “spirit” of our work; and (3) my own Yakama teachings on utilizing a decolonizing praxis within educational institutions. I conclude that American sociology needs to draw from Indigenous Studies scholarship to better understand and address the education inequalities facing Indigenous peoples in the USA. Full article
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