Special Issue "Non-Motorized Road Users Safety"

A special issue of Safety (ISSN 2313-576X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Francisco Alonso
Website
Guest Editor
Research Institute on Traffic and Road Safety, University of Valencia, C/ Serpis 29, 3rd Floor. 46022 Valencia, Spain
Interests: traffic; transport; mobility; road safety; human factors; road users; public health; risk assessment; decision making
Prof. Sergio A. Useche
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Research Institute on Traffic and Road Safety, University of Valencia, C/ Serpis 29, 3rd Floor, 46022 Valencia, Spain
Interests: transportation; applied psychology; professional driving; non-motorized transportation; psychosocial risk factors; stress; fatigue; risky behaviors; transport policy
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During recent years, non-motorized transportation has become increasingly “fashionable” and utilized, and there is great promotion of this mode of transport by governments and other organizations, among others, due to the benefits for public health and environmental sustainability. We can note how, especially in urban territories, alternative transport means allowing road users to combine both traveling and non-intensive physical activity with everyday tasks, such as commuting. Therefore, offering active means of transportation, such as cycling and walking, has systematically acquired higher relevance for public policy, considering that it is, overall, accessible for the population and entails a series of key benefits for both the transport and health of road users. However, non-motorized transport may imply a wide series of risks and hazardous scenarios for its users, leading to an increase in traffic accidents involving these modes of transport, as has been shown by various epidemiological studies in various worldwide locations. Consequently, this topic should be studied further and documented, in order to develop measures and strategies for guaranteeing the safety and welfare of non-motorized road users, which must be included to a greater extent in the mobility and road safety plans developed by authorities.

For this Special Issue, we are inviting authors from all over the world and in all disciplines to submit their papers (original research manuscripts, literature reviews, empirical studies, epidemiology studies, reports on the monitoring and evaluation of plans and interventions, protocols, and case studies) on issues related to improving the road safety for non-motorized modes of transport. Please note that submissions must adhere to the journal guidelines, which may be found at https://www.mdpi.com/journal/safety/instructions. For more information, please review the keywords and/or contact Prof. Dr. Francisco Alonso (Guest Editor; [email protected]).

Prof. Dr. Francisco Alonso
Dr. Sergio A. Useche
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Safety is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • non-motorized road users
  • alternative transportation
  • pedestrians
  • bicyclists
  • transportation trends and problems
  • sustainability
  • safe transportation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effects Influencing Pedestrian–Vehicle Crash Frequency by Severity Level: A Case Study of Seoul Metropolitan City, South Korea
Safety 2020, 6(2), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety6020025 - 13 May 2020
Abstract
This study aimed to determine how built environments affect pedestrian–vehicle collisions. The study examined pedestrian–vehicular crashes that occurred between 2013 and 2015 in Seoul, Korea, by comparing and analyzing different effects of the built environment on pedestrian–vehicle crashes. Specifically, the study analyzed built [...] Read more.
This study aimed to determine how built environments affect pedestrian–vehicle collisions. The study examined pedestrian–vehicular crashes that occurred between 2013 and 2015 in Seoul, Korea, by comparing and analyzing different effects of the built environment on pedestrian–vehicle crashes. Specifically, the study analyzed built environment attributes, land use environment, housing types, road environment, and traffic characteristics to determine how these factors affect the severity of pedestrian injury. The results of the statistical analysis appear to infer that the built environment attributes had dissimilar impacts on pedestrian collisions, depending on the injury severity. In general, both incapacitating and non-incapacitating injuries appear to be more likely to be caused by the built environment than fatal and possible injuries. These results highlight the need to consider injury severity when implementing more effective interventions and strategies for ensuring pedestrian safety. However, because of the small sample size, an expanded research project regarding this issue should be considered, as it would contribute to the development and implementation of effective policies and interventions for pedestrian safety in Korea. This study therefore offers practical information regarding the development of such an expanded study to inform future traffic safety policies in Seoul to establish a “safe walking city.” Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Motorized Road Users Safety)
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Open AccessArticle
Characteristics of Commuters’ Single-Bicycle Crashes in Insurance Data
Safety 2020, 6(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety6010013 - 16 Feb 2020
Abstract
In order to maximize the public health benefits of cycling, the negative impacts of cycling, such as the number and types of crashes, should be identified. Single-bicycle crashes, in which other road users are not collided with, are one of the main safety [...] Read more.
In order to maximize the public health benefits of cycling, the negative impacts of cycling, such as the number and types of crashes, should be identified. Single-bicycle crashes, in which other road users are not collided with, are one of the main safety concerns in cycling, but comprehensive knowledge on these crashes is not available due to poor data sources. This study aimed to identify characteristics of commuters’ single-bicycle crashes in Finland. Firstly, insurance data covering 9268 commuter bicycle crashes in 2016 and 2017 were analyzed to find single-bicycle crashes. The insurance data are based on self-reported crashes. In total, 3448 single-bicycle crashes were found with crash descriptions that were informative enough for investigation of their characteristics. According to the results, 62.9% (95% confidence interval +/− 1.6%) of the crashes were related to the infrastructure. In the majority of infrastructure-related crashes, the road surface was slippery. The slippery road surface was typically due to icy or snowy conditions. The lack of proper data complicates the recognition of single-bicycle crashes, and hence policy actions and research projects are needed to develop better data sources for proper investigation of cycling safety. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Motorized Road Users Safety)
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