Special Issue "Ecological Management: Natural Resources and Human Interaction"

A special issue of Resources (ISSN 2079-9276).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Yadav Uprety
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Center for Applied Science and Technology, Tribhuvan University, Kirtipur, Nepal and IUCN Nepal
Interests: traditional ecological knowledge; ecosystem services; human–environment interactions; biodiversity use and conservation; environmental policies; plant ecology; ecological restoration

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Understanding human–environment interactions is vital for addressing current multidimensional challenges. The landscape approach is considered effective in managing and maintaining the ‘multifunctionality’ and ‘human dimensions’ of the ecological systems. Multiple stakeholder participation is another prerequisite. The discussion in the field has gradually shifted to ‘human dimensions’ together with ‘technological solutions’ for the better management of natural resources and to address challenges that our generation is facing, including global changes. Therefore, it has long been necessary to give more attention to the multidisciplinary research that can consider various nexus of the resource management and contribute to a deeper understanding of the socioecological systems. 

 

This Special Issue aims to publish contributions that have considered human dimensions more critically in ecological management. Specific case studies and analytical reviews addressing policy and sociocultural spheres are also encouraged.

Dr. Yadav Uprety
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Resources is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Human–environment interactions
  • Landscapes
  • Biodiversity
  • Ecosystems
  • Resources
  • Traditional ecological knowledge
  • Multifunctionality
  • Multistakeholder
  • Natural resource management

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
An Approach to Estimating Water Quality Changes in Water Distribution Systems Using Fault Tree Analysis
Resources 2019, 8(4), 162; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources8040162 - 27 Sep 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2458
Abstract
Given that a consequence of a lack of stability of the water in a distribution system is increased susceptibility to secondary contamination and, hence, a threat to consumer health, in the work detailed here we assessed the risk of such a system experiencing [...] Read more.
Given that a consequence of a lack of stability of the water in a distribution system is increased susceptibility to secondary contamination and, hence, a threat to consumer health, in the work detailed here we assessed the risk of such a system experiencing quality changes relating to the biological and chemical stability of water intended for drinking. Utilizing real operational data from a water treatment station, the presented analysis of the stability was performed based on the fault tree method. If they are to protect their critical-status water supply infrastructure, water supply companies should redouble their efforts to distribute stable water free of potentially corrosive properties. To that end, suggestions are made on the safeguarding of water distribution systems, with a view to ensuring the safety of operation and the long-term durability of pipes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecological Management: Natural Resources and Human Interaction)
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Article
Estimation of Mining and Landfilling Activities with Associated Overburden through Satellite Data: Germany 2000–2010
Resources 2019, 8(3), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources8030126 - 16 Jul 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2434
Abstract
Despite ever-increasing material extraction on the global scale, very few studies have focused on the relationship between mining activities, overburden, and landfilling. This is mainly due to the lack of statistical data. Yet, large mining activities cause environmental strain to the natural environment, [...] Read more.
Despite ever-increasing material extraction on the global scale, very few studies have focused on the relationship between mining activities, overburden, and landfilling. This is mainly due to the lack of statistical data. Yet, large mining activities cause environmental strain to the natural environment, and are often cause of irreversible alterations to the natural landscape. To circumvent this problem, we develop a methodology that employs the digital elevation model and land cover to detect and analyze mining and landfilling site over time. We test our methodology with the case of Germany for the years 2000–2010. We then confront our results with statistically available data, to verify whether this methodology can be applied to other countries. Results from the analysis of satellite data give 15.3 Pg of extracted materials and 7.8 Pg of landfilled materials, while statistics report 29.4 Pg and 1.8 Pg, respectively. This large difference was likely due to the different frequency of recording, where satellite data was updated after 10 years, while statistics were reported yearly. The analysis of the anthropogenic disturbance with spatial information can effectively contribute to observe, analyze, and quantify mining activities, overburden, and landfills, and can thus provide policy makers with useful and practical information regarding resource usage and waste management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecological Management: Natural Resources and Human Interaction)
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Article
Opportunities and Threats of Implementing Drain Water Heat Recovery Units in Poland
Resources 2019, 8(2), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources8020088 - 05 May 2019
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2872
Abstract
In recent years an increase of interest in usage of renewable energy sources as a substitution of fossil fuels is being noticeable. However, the waste heat potential, which can be used as an additional source of energy for heating water in buildings, is [...] Read more.
In recent years an increase of interest in usage of renewable energy sources as a substitution of fossil fuels is being noticeable. However, the waste heat potential, which can be used as an additional source of energy for heating water in buildings, is being omitted. The sources of this heat can be grey water discharged from such sanitary facilities as showers or washing machines. In response to this issue, we took on the task to define and analyze key factors affecting the development of DWHR (Drain Water Heat Recovery) systems using PESTLE (political, economic, social, technological, legal and environmental) analysis. The strengths and weaknesses of these systems were also identified. The studies were based on CFD (computational fluid dynamics) modeling tools. In the Autodesk Simulation CFD software environment, a DWHR unit was made, which was then analyzed for heat exchange efficiency. The obtained results were the basis for preparing the strategy for the development of Drain Water Heat Recovery systems. It was made using the SWOT/TOWS (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats/threats, opportunities, weaknesses and strengths) method, which precisely orders information and allows presenting the project characteristic in readable way for a recipient. The results of the conducted analysis indicated the lack of acceptance on the part of potential users and the resulting need to promote the use of Drain Water Heat Recovery systems at residential level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecological Management: Natural Resources and Human Interaction)
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Article
Evaluating the Response of Mediterranean-Atlantic Saltmarshes to Sea-Level Rise
Resources 2019, 8(1), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources8010050 - 09 Mar 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2393
Abstract
Saltmarshes provide high-value ecological services and play an important role in coastal ecosystems and populations. As the rate of sea level rise accelerates in response to climate change, saltmarshes and tidal environments and the ecosystem services that they provide could be lost in [...] Read more.
Saltmarshes provide high-value ecological services and play an important role in coastal ecosystems and populations. As the rate of sea level rise accelerates in response to climate change, saltmarshes and tidal environments and the ecosystem services that they provide could be lost in those areas that lack sediment supply for vertical accretion or space for landward migration. Predictive models could play an important role in foreseeing those impacts, and to guide the implementation of suitable management plans that increase the adaptive capacity of these valuable ecosystems. The SLAMM (sea-level affecting marshes model) has been extensively used to evaluate coastal wetland habitat response to sea-level rise. However, uncertainties in predicted response will also reflect the accuracy and quality of primary inputs such as elevation and habitat coverage. Here, we assessed the potential of SLAMM for investigating the response of Atlantic-Mediterranean saltmarshes to future sea-level rise and its application in managerial schemes. Our findings show that SLAMM is sensitive to elevation and habitat maps resolution and that historical sea-level trend and saltmarsh accretion rates are the predominant input parameters that influence uncertainty in predictions of change in saltmarsh habitats. The understanding of the past evolution of the system, as well as the contemporary situation, is crucial to providing accurate uncertainty distributions and thus to set a robust baseline for future predictions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecological Management: Natural Resources and Human Interaction)
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