Special Issue "Multiple-Effect Water Resources Management"

A special issue of Resources (ISSN 2079-9276).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Nektarios Kourgialas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
NAGREF - Hellenic Agricultural Organization (H.A.O.-DEMETER),Institute of Olive Tree Subtropical Crops and Viticulture, Water Recourses-Irrigation & Env. Geoinformatics Lab., 73100 Chania, Greece
Interests: agricultural water management; water resources management and monitoring; extreme hydrological events; hydrological modeling; geoinformatics; GIS
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, the environment and especially water resources have been experiencing significant stress, resulting in water-related problems in many regions around the world. Surface and groundwater resources are continuously degraded as a result of agricultural activities, industrial wastes, as well as urban and touristic activities. In addition, climate change and the increasing rate of global warming, over the last few decades, has intensified the hydrological cycle, and increased the globally averaged precipitation, evapotranspiration, and runoff as an aftermath. Based on the above, there are geoinformatic techniques and other tools of high importance, through which hydrological processes can be simulated or predicted under different climate conditions and anthropogenic innervations. Apart from the above, this Special Issue highlights water-saving approaches in the agricultural sector, as well as investigates land use changes as an adaptation practice in water shortage rural areas.

Dr. Nektarios Kourgialas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Resources is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Water resources management and monitoring
  • Extreme hydrological events
  • Water quality
  • Salinity
  • Irrigation
  • Hydrological modeling
  • Geoinformatics
  • Decision support systems
  • Changing rural land uses

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
An Assessment of the Pakistan Water Apportionment Accord of 1991
Resources 2019, 8(3), 120; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources8030120 - 29 Jun 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3801
Abstract
The Water Apportionment Accord (WAA) of Pakistan was instituted in 1991 to allocate Indus River water among Pakistan’s provinces. This paper assesses the performance of the WAA in terms of the accord’s ability to meet the barrages’ and environmental demands in the Lower [...] Read more.
The Water Apportionment Accord (WAA) of Pakistan was instituted in 1991 to allocate Indus River water among Pakistan’s provinces. This paper assesses the performance of the WAA in terms of the accord’s ability to meet the barrages’ and environmental demands in the Lower Indus Basin. Use of metrics as assessment tools in water security and climate adaptation is an important field, with the potential to inform sustainable management policy. Reliability, resiliency, and vulnerability are used as indicators to define the system’s performance against supply. The results indicate from the pre-Accord period to the post-Accord period, the reliability of Guddu Barrage (the upstream-most barrage in the study) is not changed. However, at Sukkur and Kotri, the most downstream barrage in the study, reliability has significantly decreased. The Results reveal the high vulnerability of the Indus delta in Rabi season when the flows decline and the majority of the water at the Kotri Barrage is diverted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple-Effect Water Resources Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Willingness to Pay for Watershed Management
Resources 2019, 8(2), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources8020077 - 23 Apr 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2313
Abstract
Equitable payments for ecosystem services are emerging as a viable tool to protect and restore ecosystems. Unlike previous studies using contingent valuation approach in Ethiopia, this study is unique in its scope and target users. It explores the possibility of payment for watershed [...] Read more.
Equitable payments for ecosystem services are emerging as a viable tool to protect and restore ecosystems. Unlike previous studies using contingent valuation approach in Ethiopia, this study is unique in its scope and target users. It explores the possibility of payment for watershed services as an economic tool in supporting and promoting sustainable land management and financing community-based watershed investments from electric users at a national level. We examine the sensitivity of users’ ability to generate funds for watershed services for sustainable watershed management through the raising of small amounts of money added onto a monthly electrical bill. Sampling frame covered four of the nine regional states of Ethiopia with more than 86% coverage dating back to 2014. A total of 501 urban and rural households and 100 organizations were interviewed over a five-year period from 2014–2019. We used a multistage sampling technique; we first selected cities, towns, and villages based on several data collection methodologies. The findings indicate that about 84% and 90% of households and organizations, respectively, showed their willingness to pay (WTP) additional fees for watershed management that could potentially reduce upland degradation and siltation. Specifically, more than half of the households and organizations and industries were willing to pay the surcharge for watershed management. Likewise, we developed a model estimation of results which verified the WTP amount, respectively. We concluded that funds generated from electric users play a possible role in contributing to the financing of watershed management efforts and could be taken as an important lesson for the watershed management continuum efforts Ethiopia-wide and in other countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple-Effect Water Resources Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
GIS and Remote Sensing Aided Information for Soil Moisture Estimation: A Comparative Study of Interpolation Techniques
Resources 2019, 8(2), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources8020070 - 18 Apr 2019
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 3154
Abstract
Soil moisture represents a vital component of the ecosystem, sustaining life-supporting activities at micro and mega scales. It is a highly required parameter that may vary significantly both spatially and temporally. Due to this fact, its estimation is challenging and often hard to [...] Read more.
Soil moisture represents a vital component of the ecosystem, sustaining life-supporting activities at micro and mega scales. It is a highly required parameter that may vary significantly both spatially and temporally. Due to this fact, its estimation is challenging and often hard to obtain especially over large, heterogeneous surfaces. This study aimed at comparing the performance of four widely used interpolation methods in estimating soil moisture using GPS-aided information and remote sensing. The Distance Weighting (IDW), Spline, Ordinary Kriging models and Kriging with External Drift (KED) interpolation techniques were employed to estimate soil moisture using 82 soil moisture field-measured values. Of those measurements, data from 54 soil moisture locations were used for calibration and the remaining data for validation purposes. The study area selected was Varanasi City, India covering an area of 1535 km2. The soil moisture distribution results demonstrate the lowest RMSE (root mean square error, 8.69%) for KED, in comparison to the other approaches. For KED, the soil organic carbon information was incorporated as a secondary variable. The study results contribute towards efforts to overcome the issue of scarcity of soil moisture information at local and regional scales. It also provides an understandable method to generate and produce reliable spatial continuous datasets of this parameter, demonstrating the added value of geospatial analysis techniques for this purpose. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple-Effect Water Resources Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
A Proposal for Redesigning the Water Quality Network of the Tunjuelo River in Bogotá, Colombia through a Spatio-Temporal Analysis
Resources 2019, 8(2), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources8020064 - 06 Apr 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2276
Abstract
Bogotá is the capital of Colombia and represents the most important urban center in the country. Bogotá’s population and economic growth have accelerated exponentially in recent years and this growth has brought with it a variety of environmental impacts, including degradation of surface [...] Read more.
Bogotá is the capital of Colombia and represents the most important urban center in the country. Bogotá’s population and economic growth have accelerated exponentially in recent years and this growth has brought with it a variety of environmental impacts, including degradation of surface water quality. Government agencies have developed the water quality network of Bogotá that spans across four large rivers, including the Tunjuelo. According to measurements since 2009, water quality has changed in association with the dynamics of the city. This article utilizes a spatial and temporal analysis with multivariate statistics (Principal Components Analyses, dendograms, and Kruskal-Wallis) to propose a redesign of the Tunjuelo River water quality network. Based on these analyses, the number of monitoring stations can be reduced from nine to seven and the measurement frequency can be reduced. Together, the proposed spatial and temporal redesign would reduce the sample acquisition and analysis costs across the network by 50%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple-Effect Water Resources Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop