Special Issue "Analysis of Decadal-Scale Continuous Data Products from Weather Satellite Platforms"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Atmosphere Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Bryan A. Baum
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Science and Technology Corporation, Madison, WI 53705, USA
Interests: remote sensing of cloud properties; bulk scattering properties of ice clouds; aerosol–cloud interactions; imager and hyperspectral sensor data fusion
Prof. Ping Yang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Holder of the David Bullock Harris Chair, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
Interests: light scattering; radiative transfer; atmospheric radiation; remote sensing
Dr. Hartwig Deneke
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
Interests: estimation of cloud properties from passive satellite sensors; validation with ground-based measurements; influence of clouds and aerosols on the atmospheric radiation budget; effects of small-scale cloud variability on cloud property retrievals and radiation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, multi-decadal data records exist from polar-orbiting and geostationary satellite platforms, which are used to generate continuous products for a variety of Earth science disciplines. An important example is NASA’s Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua platforms, which were launched in 1999 and 2002, respectively, and are continued by the current Suomi-NPP and NOAA-20 platforms. Other examples include the European MetOp platforms, and various geostationary satellites, including GOES, Meteosat, Himawari, and others. The large investment in associated science discipline research (land, ocean, ozone, atmosphere, sounder, radiation budget, and calibration) over this time has resulted in significant advances in Earth system products and remote sensing methodology. Numerous space agencies have implemented programs (e.g., ESA CCI, NOAA CDR, EU C3S, NASA MEaSUREs, and the EUMETSAT SAF network) that are dedicated to analyzing the existing data archives in order to generate decadal data records of the highest quality for scientific research.

This Special Issue is dedicated to the continuity of satellite data products over a multi-decadal period, with special focus on the breakthroughs that are possible with a record based on well-calibrated data. While discussions may be included about the substantial algorithm refinement and innovative calibration techniques that are necessary in order to ensure a seamless decadal data record from measurements across the different platforms, the articles should also demonstrate how the algorithm/calibration improvements affect the long-term data record, and should include a discussion of any limitations or uncertainties that could impact the scientific analysis of the data, in particular, with respect to the investigation of inter-annual variability and trend detection. We also invite papers that make use of additional satellite platforms that extend and complement other decadal products.

Related References

This Issue is intended to expand upon the Remote Sensing Special Issue that was published earlier in 2019, which is available at the following link:

https://www.mdpi.com/journal/remotesensing/special_issues/assessment_cdr

Our Special Issue will expand on the scope of the previous Issue by providing a greater breadth of continuity products from the land, ocean, ozone, atmospheres (including clouds and aerosols), sounder, and radiation budget communities.

Dr. Bryan A. Baum
Prof. Ping Yang
Dr. Hartwig Deneke
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Decadal Data Product Generation and Analysis
  • Land Remote Sensing
  • Ocean Remote Sensing
  • Ozone Remote Sensing
  • Cloud Remote Sensing
  • Aerosol Remote Sensing
  • Radiation Budget
  • Multi-Sensor Calibration

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Climatology Perspective of Sensitive Regimes and Active Regions of Aerosol Indirect Effect for Cirrus Clouds over the Global Oceans
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(5), 823; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12050823 - 03 Mar 2020
Abstract
Long-term satellite climate data records (CDRs) of clouds and aerosols are used to investigate the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) of cirrus clouds over the global oceans from a climatology perspective. Our study focuses on identifying the sensitive regimes and active regions where AIE [...] Read more.
Long-term satellite climate data records (CDRs) of clouds and aerosols are used to investigate the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) of cirrus clouds over the global oceans from a climatology perspective. Our study focuses on identifying the sensitive regimes and active regions where AIE signatures easily manifest themselves in the sense of the long-term average of cloud and aerosol variables. The aerosol index (AIX) regimes of AIX < 0.18 and 0.18 < AIX < 0.46 are respectively identified as the sensitive regimes for negative and positive aerosol albedos and lifetime effects of cirrus clouds. Relative humidity first decreases (along with upward motions) and then reverses to increase (along with downward motions) in the first regime of negative aerosol albedo and lifetime effects. Relatively wet and strong upward motions are the favorable meteorological conditions for the second regime of positive aerosol albedo and lifetime effects. Two swath regions extending from 15°N to 30°N over the east coastal oceans of China and the USA are the active regions of positive aerosol albedo effects. Positive aerosol lifetime effects are only active or easy to manifest in the regions where a positive aerosol albedo effect is active. The results based on the long-term averaged satellite observations are valuable for the evaluation and improvement of aerosol-cloud interactions for cirrus clouds in global climate models. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Continuing the MODIS Dark Target Aerosol Time Series with VIIRS
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(2), 308; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12020308 - 17 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
For reflected sunlight observed from space at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, particles suspended in Earth’s atmosphere provide contrast with vegetation or dark water at the surface. This is the physical motivation for the Dark Target (DT) aerosol retrieval algorithm developed for the Moderate [...] Read more.
For reflected sunlight observed from space at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, particles suspended in Earth’s atmosphere provide contrast with vegetation or dark water at the surface. This is the physical motivation for the Dark Target (DT) aerosol retrieval algorithm developed for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS). To extend the data record of aerosol optical depth (AOD) beyond the expected 20-year lifespan of the MODIS sensors, DT must be adapted for other sensors. A version of the DT AOD retrieval for the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi-National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (SNPP) is now mature enough to be released as a standard data product, and includes some upgraded features from the MODIS version. Differences between MODIS Aqua and VIIRS SNPP lead to some inevitable disagreement between their respective AOD measurements, but the offset between the VIIRS SNPP and MODIS Aqua records is smaller than the offset between those of MODIS Aqua and MODIS Terra. The VIIRS SNPP retrieval shows good agreement with ground-based measurements. For most purposes, DT for VIIRS SNPP is consistent enough and in close enough agreement with MODIS to continue the record of satellite AOD. The reasons for the offset from MODIS Aqua, and its spatial and temporal variability, are investigated in this study. Full article
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