Next Article in Journal
Modelling Accessibility to Urban Green Areas Using Open Earth Observations Data: A Novel Approach to Support the Urban SDG in Four European Cities
Next Article in Special Issue
Observed HIRS and Aqua MODIS Thermal Infrared Moisture Determinations in the 2000s
Previous Article in Journal
A New Method to Predict Gully Head Erosion in the Loess Plateau of China Based on SBAS-InSAR
Previous Article in Special Issue
Climatology of the Combined ASTER MODIS Emissivity over Land (CAMEL) Version 2
Open AccessArticle

A Climate Hyperspectral Infrared Radiance Product (CHIRP) Combining the AIRS and CrIS Satellite Sounding Record

1
Physics Department, University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), Baltimore, MD 21250, USA
2
Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology (JCET), University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), Baltimore, MD 21250, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(3), 418; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13030418
Received: 10 December 2020 / Revised: 13 January 2021 / Accepted: 19 January 2021 / Published: 26 January 2021
A Climate Hyperspectral Infrared Radiance Product (CHIRP) is introduced combining data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA’s EOS-AQUA platform, the Cross-Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) sounder on NASA’s SNPP platform, and continuing with CRIS sounders on the NOAA/NASA Joint Polar Satellite Series (JPSS) of polar satellites. The CHIRP product converts the parent instrument’s radiances to a common Spectral Response Function (SRF) and removes inter-satellite biases, providing a consistent inter-satellite radiance record. The CHIRP record starts in September 2002 with AIRS, followed by CrIS SNPP and the JPSS series of CrIS instruments. The CHIRP record should continue until the mid-2040’s as additional JPSS satellites are launched. These sensors, in CHIRP format, provide the climate community with a homogeneous sensor record covering much of the infrared. We give an overview of the conversion of AIRS and CrIS to CHIRP, and define the SRF for common CHIRP format. Considerable attention is paid to removing static bias offsets among these three sensors. The CrIS instrument on NASA’s SNPP satellite is used as the calibration standard. Simultaneous Nadir Overpasses (SNOs) as well as large statistical samplings of radiances from these three satellites are used to derive the instrument bias offsets and estimate the bias offset accuracy, which is ~0.03 K. In addition, possible scene-dependent calibration differences between CHIRP derived from AIRS and CHIRP derived from CrIS on the SNPP platform are presented. View Full-Text
Keywords: satellite infrared sounder; climate record; hyperspectral infrared satellite infrared sounder; climate record; hyperspectral infrared
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Strow, L.L.; Hepplewhite, C.; Motteler, H.; Buczkowski, S.; DeSouza-Machado, S. A Climate Hyperspectral Infrared Radiance Product (CHIRP) Combining the AIRS and CrIS Satellite Sounding Record. Remote Sens. 2021, 13, 418. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13030418

AMA Style

Strow LL, Hepplewhite C, Motteler H, Buczkowski S, DeSouza-Machado S. A Climate Hyperspectral Infrared Radiance Product (CHIRP) Combining the AIRS and CrIS Satellite Sounding Record. Remote Sensing. 2021; 13(3):418. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13030418

Chicago/Turabian Style

Strow, L. L.; Hepplewhite, Chris; Motteler, Howard; Buczkowski, Steven; DeSouza-Machado, Sergio. 2021. "A Climate Hyperspectral Infrared Radiance Product (CHIRP) Combining the AIRS and CrIS Satellite Sounding Record" Remote Sens. 13, no. 3: 418. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13030418

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop