Special Issue "Remote Sensing of Night-Time Light"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ran Goldblatt
Website
Guest Editor
New Light Technologies Inc., Washington DC, USA
Interests: remote sensing; image classification; economic development; disaster management; night-time lights; built-up land cover
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Steven Louis Rubinyi
Website
Guest Editor
The World Bank, Washington, DC 20433, USA
Interests: remote sensing; built environment; natural environment; population modeling; spatial economics; GIS
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Hogeun Park
Website
Guest Editor
The World Bank, Washington, DC, USA
Interests: Urbanization; Land use and land cover change; Urban Economy; Spatial Analytics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the early 1990s, with the launch of DMSP-OLS, remotely sensed observations of night-time lights have been a key tool for understanding almost every aspect related to human activity on Earth, without being filtered through national data agencies that are potentially inefficient or biased. Night-time lights can indicate the characteristics of a wide range of human-related aspects, from economic activity and development, urbanization processes, changes in GDP, migration patterns, economic impacts of conflicts, or the impacts of natural hazards on vulnerable populations. Newer sensors, such as VIIRS/DNB, provide night-time light data even at a higher spatial resolution, allowing us to understand variations in human activity and its relation to the natural and the human environment in much higher granularity. With advances in the availability and quality of night-time light data, improvements in data storage capabilities and the development of new methods and workflows for analyzing the data, there is an increase in the number of scientific applications that exploit remotely sensed night-time lights to better understand our world. This Special Issue of Remote Sensing will stimulate progress in the remote sensing research domain related to the utilization of night-time lights in a wide range of scientific domains, including economics, social sciences, disaster management, environmental sciences, ecology, urban research, and more. The issue will bring together original and novel studies demonstrating the applications of remotely sensed night-time lights in a wide range of multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary domains. Review contributions are also welcomed.

Dr. Ran Goldblatt
Mr. Steven Louis Rubinyi
Dr. Hogeun Park
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Night-time lights
  • VIIRS
  • DMSP-OLS
  • Economic development
  • Economic activity
  • Data fusion
  • Urbanization processes
  • GDP
  • Poverty
  • Electrification

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Dimming of Lights in China during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(17), 2851; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12172851 - 02 Sep 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
A satellite survey of the cumulative radiant emissions from electric lighting across China reveals a large radiance decline in lighting from December 2019 to February 2020—the peak of the lockdown established to suppress the spread of COVID-19 infections. To illustrate the changes, an [...] Read more.
A satellite survey of the cumulative radiant emissions from electric lighting across China reveals a large radiance decline in lighting from December 2019 to February 2020—the peak of the lockdown established to suppress the spread of COVID-19 infections. To illustrate the changes, an analysis was also conducted on a reference set from a year prior to the pandemic. In the reference period, the majority (62%) of China’s population lived in administrative units that became brighter in March 2019 relative to December 2018. The situation reversed in February 2020, when 82% of the population lived in administrative units where lighting dimmed as a result of the pandemic. The dimming has also been demonstrated with difference images for the reference and pandemic image pairs, scattergrams, and a nightly temporal profile. The results indicate that it should be feasible to monitor declines and recovery in economic activity levels using nighttime lighting as a proxy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of Night-Time Light)
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