Special Issue "Remote Sensing of Night-Time Light"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ran Goldblatt
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
New Light Technologies Inc., Washington DC, USA
Interests: remote sensing; image classification; economic development; disaster management; night-time lights; built-up land cover
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Steven Louis Rubinyi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The World Bank, Washington, DC 20433, USA
Interests: remote sensing; built environment; natural environment; population modeling; spatial economics; GIS
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Hogeun Park
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The World Bank, Washington, DC, USA
Interests: urbanization; land use and land cover change; urban economy; spatial analytics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the early 1990s, with the launch of DMSP-OLS, remotely sensed observations of night-time lights have been a key tool for understanding almost every aspect related to human activity on Earth, without being filtered through national data agencies that are potentially inefficient or biased. Night-time lights can indicate the characteristics of a wide range of human-related aspects, from economic activity and development, urbanization processes, changes in GDP, migration patterns, economic impacts of conflicts, or the impacts of natural hazards on vulnerable populations. Newer sensors, such as VIIRS/DNB, provide night-time light data even at a higher spatial resolution, allowing us to understand variations in human activity and its relation to the natural and the human environment in much higher granularity. With advances in the availability and quality of night-time light data, improvements in data storage capabilities and the development of new methods and workflows for analyzing the data, there is an increase in the number of scientific applications that exploit remotely sensed night-time lights to better understand our world. This Special Issue of Remote Sensing will stimulate progress in the remote sensing research domain related to the utilization of night-time lights in a wide range of scientific domains, including economics, social sciences, disaster management, environmental sciences, ecology, urban research, and more. The issue will bring together original and novel studies demonstrating the applications of remotely sensed night-time lights in a wide range of multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary domains. Review contributions are also welcomed.

Dr. Ran Goldblatt
Mr. Steven Louis Rubinyi
Dr. Hogeun Park
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Night-time lights
  • VIIRS
  • DMSP-OLS
  • Economic development
  • Economic activity
  • Data fusion
  • Urbanization processes
  • GDP
  • Poverty
  • Electrification

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Article
Night-Time Light Remote Sensing Mapping: Construction and Analysis of Ethnic Minority Development Index
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(11), 2129; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13112129 - 28 May 2021
Viewed by 1091
Abstract
Using toponym data, population data, and night-time light data, we visualized the development index of the Yi, Wa, Zhuang, Naxi, Hani, and Dai ethnic groups on ArcGIS as well as the distribution of 25 ethnic minorities in the study area. First, we extracted [...] Read more.
Using toponym data, population data, and night-time light data, we visualized the development index of the Yi, Wa, Zhuang, Naxi, Hani, and Dai ethnic groups on ArcGIS as well as the distribution of 25 ethnic minorities in the study area. First, we extracted the toponym data of 25 ethnic minorities in the study area, combined with night-time light data and the population proportion data of each ethnic group, then we obtained the development index of each ethnic group in the study area. We compared the development indexes of the Yi, Wa, Zhuang, Naxi, Hani, and Dai ethnic groups with higher development indexes. The results show that the Yi nationality’s development index was the highest, reaching 28.86 (with two decimal places), and the Dai nationality’s development index was the lowest (15.22). The areas with the highest minority development index were concentrated in the core area of the minority development, and the size varied with the minority’s distance. According to the distribution of ethnic minorities, we found that the Yi ethnic group was distributed in almost the entire study area, while other ethnic minorities had obvious geographical distribution characteristics, and there were multiple ethnic minorities living together. This research is of great significance to the cultural protection of ethnic minorities, the development of ethnic minorities, and the remote sensing mapping of lights at night. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of Night-Time Light)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Examining the Economic and Environmental Impacts of COVID-19 Using Earth Observation Data
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13010005 - 22 Dec 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2311
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has infected almost 73 million people and is responsible for over 1.63 million fatalities worldwide since early December 2019, when it was first reported in Wuhan, China. In the early stages of the pandemic, social distancing measures, such as lockdown [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has infected almost 73 million people and is responsible for over 1.63 million fatalities worldwide since early December 2019, when it was first reported in Wuhan, China. In the early stages of the pandemic, social distancing measures, such as lockdown restrictions, were applied in a non-uniform way across the world to reduce the spread of the virus. While such restrictions contributed to flattening the curve in places like Italy, Germany, and South Korea, it plunged the economy in the United States to a level of recession not seen since WWII, while also improving air quality due to the reduced mobility. Using daily Earth observation data (Day/Night Band (DNB) from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Suomi-NPP and NO2 measurements from the TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument TROPOMI) along with monthly averaged cell phone derived mobility data, we examined the economic and environmental impacts of lockdowns in Los Angeles, California; Chicago, Illinois; Washington DC from February to April 2020—encompassing the most profound shutdown measures taken in the U.S. The preliminary analysis revealed that the reduction in mobility involved two major observable impacts: (i) improved air quality (a reduction in NO2 and PM2.5 concentration), but (ii) reduced economic activity (a decrease in energy consumption as measured by the radiance from the DNB data) that impacted on gross domestic product, poverty levels, and the unemployment rate. With the continuing rise of COVID-19 cases and declining economic conditions, such knowledge can be combined with unemployment and demographic data to develop policies and strategies for the safe reopening of the economy while preserving our environment and protecting vulnerable populations susceptible to COVID-19 infection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of Night-Time Light)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Dimming of Lights in China during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(17), 2851; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12172851 - 02 Sep 2020
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 2833
Abstract
A satellite survey of the cumulative radiant emissions from electric lighting across China reveals a large radiance decline in lighting from December 2019 to February 2020—the peak of the lockdown established to suppress the spread of COVID-19 infections. To illustrate the changes, an [...] Read more.
A satellite survey of the cumulative radiant emissions from electric lighting across China reveals a large radiance decline in lighting from December 2019 to February 2020—the peak of the lockdown established to suppress the spread of COVID-19 infections. To illustrate the changes, an analysis was also conducted on a reference set from a year prior to the pandemic. In the reference period, the majority (62%) of China’s population lived in administrative units that became brighter in March 2019 relative to December 2018. The situation reversed in February 2020, when 82% of the population lived in administrative units where lighting dimmed as a result of the pandemic. The dimming has also been demonstrated with difference images for the reference and pandemic image pairs, scattergrams, and a nightly temporal profile. The results indicate that it should be feasible to monitor declines and recovery in economic activity levels using nighttime lighting as a proxy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of Night-Time Light)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Other

Jump to: Research

Technical Note
Pandemic Induced Changes in Economic Activity around African Protected Areas Captured through Night-Time Light Data
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(2), 314; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13020314 - 18 Jan 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1544
Abstract
The importance of tourism for development is widely recognized. Travel restrictions imposed to contain the spread of COVID-19 have brought tourism to a halt. Tourism is one of the key sectors driving change in Africa and is based exclusively on natural assets, with [...] Read more.
The importance of tourism for development is widely recognized. Travel restrictions imposed to contain the spread of COVID-19 have brought tourism to a halt. Tourism is one of the key sectors driving change in Africa and is based exclusively on natural assets, with wildlife being the main attraction. Economic activities, therefore, are clustered around conservation and protected areas. We used night-time light data as a proxy measure for economic activity to assess change due to the pandemic. Our analysis shows that overall, 75 percent of the 8427 protected areas saw a decrease in light intensity in varying degrees in all countries and across IUCN protected area categories, including in popular protected area destinations, indicating a reduction in tourism-related economic activities. As countries discuss COVID-19 recovery, the methods using spatially explicit data illustrated in this paper can assess the extent of change, inform decision-making, and prioritize recovery efforts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of Night-Time Light)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop