Special Issue "Geospatial Techniques in Advancing Land-Change Science and Management"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (18 May 2022) | Viewed by 7074

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Md. Shahinoor Rahman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, New Jersey City University, Jersey City, NJ 07305, USA
Interests: remote sensing; GIS; spatial analytics; coastal land change; natural hazard; urban and environment studies
Dr. Mohammed Sarfaraz Gani Adnan
E-Mail Website1 Website2 Website3
Guest Editor
1.Environmental Change Institute, School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3QY, UK
2.Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Chittagong University of Engineering and Technology (CUET), Chittagong 4349, Bangladesh
Interests: earth system processes and disaster management; flood risk modeling; GIS/remote sensing and Earth system dynamics; geo and natural hazards; urban and regional planning
Dr. Steven Louis Rubinyi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The World Bank, Washington, DC 20433, USA
Interests: remote sensing; built environment; natural environment; population modeling; spatial economics; GIS
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Land change is one of the most ancient human-induced environmental impacts on the biosphere. Changes in land systems have major repercussions for climate change, biodiversity and ecosystem services, land degradation, and the vulnerability of human–environment systems. For instance, land degradation is increasing and affecting areas that more than one-third of the global population inhabit. Due to this phenomenon, a significant proportion of agricultural land becomes unproductive every year. Climate change is likely to exacerbate the impacts of land change, especially in coastal regions, due to their combined effects on water security, land availability, and food security. Therefore, efficient land management is a prime concern around the world.

Land-change science has emerged as an essential element of global environmental change and sustainability science. However, this field of science has been handicapped by the unavailability of required data, and methodological and analytical difficulties. Mapping and monitoring land change is an exciting field of remote sensing technology. Although early land change assessments were primarily based on expert judgment, over the last few decades, remote sensing techniques have become an essential tool to map and monitor various aspects of land change at different spatial and temporal scales. Geospatial techniques are effective and efficient tools for assessment, monitoring, and mapping lands. An accurate assessment of land change and management can help scientists, policymakers, and stakeholders to improve the decision-making process for better managing lands.

We would like to invite you to submit review articles as well as original articles on one or more of the following topics:

  • Land change science for global environmental change;
  • Characteristics of land degradation;
  • Urban expansion and land cover change;
  • Monitoring and mapping wetland loss;
  • Issues related to the application of remote sensing technologies for the identification and mapping of land degradation features;
  • Different methods of remote sensing-based land change assessment;
  • Remote sensing in coastal hazard mapping and monitoring;
  • Applications of machine learning algorithms and remote sensing data in land change assessment;
  • Spatial and temporal pattern of soil degradation;
  • Land degradation risk assessment;
  • Integrating geostatistical and remote sensing data for assessing land change;
  • Response to land degradation;
  • Monitoring land change using both optical and SAR remote sensing;
  • Impacts of sea-level rise on coastal land change;
  • Mapping and monitoring of coast-line change;
  • Monitoring land cover and land-use change;
  • Mapping and monitoring soil salinity and soil moisture;
  • GIS application in land management;
  • GIS application in land policy and decision making;
  • Spatial analytics in land change science and land management.

Dr. Md. Shahinoor Rahman
Dr. Mohammed Sarfaraz Gani Adnan
Dr. Steven Louis Rubinyi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • land degradation
  • remote sensing
  • GIS
  • geo-statistics
  • coastal change
  • coastal hazard
  • coastal erosion
  • soil salinity
  • land cover land use
  • machine learning

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Water Erosion Monitoring and Prediction in Response to the Effects of Climate Change Using RUSLE and SWAT Equations: Case of R’Dom Watershed in Morocco
Land 2022, 11(1), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11010093 - 07 Jan 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1879
Abstract
Soil erosion is an increasingly issue worldwide, due to several factors including climate variations and humans’ activities, especially in Mediterranean ecosystems. Therefore, the aim of this paper is: (i) to quantify and to predict soil erosion rate for the baseline period (2000–2013) and [...] Read more.
Soil erosion is an increasingly issue worldwide, due to several factors including climate variations and humans’ activities, especially in Mediterranean ecosystems. Therefore, the aim of this paper is: (i) to quantify and to predict soil erosion rate for the baseline period (2000–2013) and a future period (2014–2027), using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) and the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model in the R’Dom watershed in Morocco, based on the opportunities of Remote Sensing (RS) techniques and Geographical Information System (GIS) geospatial tools. (ii) we based on classical statistical downscaling model (SDSM) for rainfall prediction. Due to the lack of field data, the model results are validated by expert knowledge. As a result of this study, it is found that both agricultural lands and bare lands are most affected by soil erosion. Moreover, it is showed that soil erosion in the watershed was dominated by very low and low erosion. Although the area of very low erosion and low erosion continued to decrease. Hence, we hereby envisage that our contribution will provide a more complete understanding of the soil degradation in this study area and the results of this research could be a crucial reference in soil erosion studies and also may serve as a valuable guidance for watershed management strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geospatial Techniques in Advancing Land-Change Science and Management)
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Article
The Spatial Distribution Characteristics of the Cultivated Land Quality in the Diluvial Fan Terrain of the Arid Region: A Case Study of Jimsar County, Xinjiang, China
Land 2021, 10(9), 896; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10090896 - 25 Aug 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1222
Abstract
Environmental constraints are not only important aspects that affect the cultivated land quality but also necessary factors that shall be considered when evaluating the cultivated land quality scientifically. Moreover, identifying the quality condition of cultivated land accurately is the premise for guaranteeing food [...] Read more.
Environmental constraints are not only important aspects that affect the cultivated land quality but also necessary factors that shall be considered when evaluating the cultivated land quality scientifically. Moreover, identifying the quality condition of cultivated land accurately is the premise for guaranteeing food security. Based on the case study of diluvial fan terrain in Jimsar County, Xinjiang in the arid region of Northwest China, this study utilizes a geographic information system spatial analysis and a multifactor comprehensive evaluation method and constructs a comprehensive evaluation index system for cultivated land quality on account of three dimensions, namely soil properties, farming conditions, and natural environmental conditions. To reduce the Modifiable Areal Unit Problem (MAUP) effect and improve the accuracy of the quality evaluation results of cultivated land, this study compares the spatial interpolation methods of Inverse Distance Weighted Matrix (IDW), Ordinary Kriging (OK), and Spline Functions (Spline) based on different cultivated land evaluation units. Through the assessment on the comparison results, we finally adopted large-scale cultivated land as the quality evaluation unit of cultivated land and Ordinary Kriging (OK) as the spatial interpolation method. The results indicated that the average grade of the quality index of cultivated land in the diluvial fan terrain of Jimsar County is 6.66 at the middle or lower level; the quality of cultivated land and natural environment conditions reduce with the rise of elevation of the diluvial fan terrain, indicating a vertical zonality differentiation rule; the farming conditions keep sliding from the middle part of diluvial fan terrain to the edge of the diluvial fan terrain and the piedmont slope. The major factors affecting the quality of the cultivated land include the soil capacity, soil pH, soil organic matter, the quantity of straw returning to the field, source of irrigation water, water delivery method, part of the diluvial fan, groundwater level depth, and geomorphic type. Therefore, the measures to improve the quality of the cultivated land are put forward, mainly including improving the soil, carrying out land consolidation projects, and developing highly efficient water-saving irrigation agriculture. This study provides favorable references and directions for the sustainable utilization and quality improvement of cultivated land resources in arid regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geospatial Techniques in Advancing Land-Change Science and Management)
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Article
Surface Runoff Responses to Suburban Growth: An Integration of Remote Sensing, GIS, and Curve Number
Land 2021, 10(5), 452; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10050452 - 23 Apr 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2499
Abstract
Suburban growth and its impacts on surface runoff were investigated using the soil conservation service curve number (SCS-CN) model, compared with the integrated advanced remote sensing and geographic information system (GIS)-based integrated approach, over South Kingston, Rhode Island, USA. This study analyzed and [...] Read more.
Suburban growth and its impacts on surface runoff were investigated using the soil conservation service curve number (SCS-CN) model, compared with the integrated advanced remote sensing and geographic information system (GIS)-based integrated approach, over South Kingston, Rhode Island, USA. This study analyzed and employed the supervised classification method on four Landsat images from 1994, 2004, 2014, and 2020 to detect land-use pattern changes through remote sensing applications. Results showed that 68.6% urban land expansion was reported from 1994 to 2020 in this suburban area. After land-use change detection, a GIS-based SCS-CN model was developed to examine suburban growth and surface runoff estimation. The developed model demonstrated the spatial distribution of runoff for each of the studied years. The results showed an increasing spatial pattern of 2% to 10% of runoff from 1994 to 2020. The correlation between runoff co-efficient and rainfall indicated the significant impact of suburban growth in surface runoff over the last 36 years in South Kingstown, RI, USA, showing a slight change of forest (8.2% area of the total area) and agricultural land (4.8% area of the total area). Suburban growth began after 2000, and within 16 years this land-use change started to show its substantial impact on surface runoff. We concluded that the proposed integrated approach could classify land-use and land cover information to understand suburban growth and its potential impact on the area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geospatial Techniques in Advancing Land-Change Science and Management)
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