Special Issue "Applications of GNSS Reflectometry for Earth Observation"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Nereida Rodriguez-Alvarez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109, USA
Interests: bistatic radar; GNSS-R; freeze/thaw; vegetation characterization; sea ice; wetlands; urban/agricultural flooding
Dr. Mary Morris
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109, USA
Interests: atmospheric & hydrologic science; geophysical remote sensing; passive microwave radiometry; GNSS-Reflectometry; inversion techniques; multi-sensor data assimilation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The availability of data from missions such as CYclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) and TechDemoSat-1 (TDS-1) has made a significant impact on the scientific return of the Global Navigation Satellite System–Reflectometry (GNSS-R) measurements. Data from these missions demonstrate the capabilities of GNSS-R and build on many applications that relate the properties of scattered GNSS signals to geophysical parameters. TDS-1 provides global data coverage, while the constellation of CYGNSS spacecrafts, although limited to the tropics (±37° latitude), provide observations on rapid timescales with high spatial resolution. Equally important are measurements from airborne and ground-based instruments; these data enable investigations of the sensitivity of GNSS-R measurements to different phenomena and their use in new applications at a local/regional scale.

We invite authors to submit their work on applications that use GNSS-R data for Earth science. We encourage the submission of works related to the synergistic use of GNSS-R data with data from other sensors at the same or different frequency of operations, enhancing spatial resolution and/or temporal sampling to improve estimates of geophysical parameters. Topics considered for this Special Issue should emphasize practical applications and reach beyond theoretical and model-based studies. Suggested topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Ocean, land, or cryosphere applications using GNSS-R;
  • Applications using GNSS-R ground-based or airborne measurements;
  • Applications using GNSS-R satellite measurements;
  • GNSS-R based neural networks for specific applications;
  • GNSS-R based classification algorithms for targeted applications;
  • GNSS-R and SAR/Radiometer/Optical combined products;
  • Downscaling or enhancement methods employing GNSS-R.

Dr. Nereida Rodriguez-Alvarez
Dr. Mary Morris
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • GNSS-R
  • Cryosphere
  • Near-surface ocean wind vector
  • Soil moisture
  • Terrestrial hydrology
  • Biomass
  • Ship detection
  • Oil slick detection
  • Neural networks
  • Classification
  • Downscaling

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Detecting Targets above the Earth’s Surface Using GNSS-R Delay Doppler Maps: Results from TDS-1
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(19), 2327; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11192327 - 07 Oct 2019
Abstract
Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) reflected signals can be used to remotely sense the Earth’s surface, known as GNSS reflectometry (GNSS-R). The GNSS-R technique has been applied to numerous areas, such as the retrieval of wind speed, and the detection of Earth surface [...] Read more.
Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) reflected signals can be used to remotely sense the Earth’s surface, known as GNSS reflectometry (GNSS-R). The GNSS-R technique has been applied to numerous areas, such as the retrieval of wind speed, and the detection of Earth surface objects. This work proposes a new application of GNSS-R, namely to detect objects above the Earth’s surface, such as low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites. To discuss its feasibility, 14 delay Doppler maps (DDMs) are first presented which contain unusually bright reflected signals as delays shorter than the specular reflection point over the Earth’s surface. Then, seven possible causes of these anomalies are analysed, reaching the conclusion that the anomalies are likely due to the signals being reflected from objects above the Earth’s surface. Next, the positions of the objects are calculated using the delay and Doppler information, and an appropriate geometry assumption. After that, suspect satellite objects are searched in the satellite database from Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS). Finally, three objects have been found to match the delay and Doppler conditions. In the absence of other reasons for these anomalies, GNSS-R could potentially be used to detect some objects above the Earth’s surface. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of GNSS Reflectometry for Earth Observation)
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