Special Issue "Advanced Technologies in Biohydrogen and Bioprocesses"

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Green Processes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Shu-Yii Wu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Feng Chia University, Taiwan, Website: Department of Chemical Engineering FENG CHIA UNIVERSITY 100, Wenhwa Rd., Seatwen, Taichung, Taiwan 40724, R.O.C.
Interests: reactor design; bio-hydrogen production technology; electrochemical deposition technology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Chyi-How Lay
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
General Education Center/Master's Program of Green Energy Science and Technology, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan
Interests: biorefinery engineering; biogas production; microalgae
Dr. Pau Loke Show
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Nottingham Malaysia, Broga Road, Semenyih 43500, Malaysia.
Interests: bioprocessing from upstream to downstream; separation and purification technology; algae biorefinery engineering
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Processes is announcing a Call for Papers for a forthcoming issue on “Advanced Technologies in Biohydrogen and Bioprocesses

Biohydrogen from both fossil and renewable biomass resources is a sustainable source of energy that is not limited and has different applications. The most commonly used techniques of biohydrogen production include direct biophotolysis, indirect biophotolysis, photo-fermentation, and dark-fermentation, conventional or “modern” techniques. The main limitations inherent to biochemical reactions for hydrogen production and design are the constraints in reactor configuration which influence biohydrogen production, and these have been identified. Physical pretreatments, modifications in reactor design, and biochemical and genetic manipulation techniques that are being developed to enhance the overall rates and yields of biohydrogen generation are important.

This Special Issue aims to provide a platform to showcase the recent and advanced technologies in biohydrogen and bioprocesses. The key goals of this Special Issue are to generate research on the integrated biological and environmental bioprocesses that are particularly useful for the production of biofuels and bioproducts using new technologies.

Areas of interest include:

  1. Bioenergy: Biohydrogen and biohythane; biogas and gas upgrading; microbial electrical cells; bioelectro-chemical systems; biomass and biofuels.
  2. Bioprocesses: Waste-to-energy; biorefinery and bioprocess.
  3. Energy management systems: Green synergy; energy storage; intelligent grids; intelligent green buildings.
  4. New and renewable energy: green hydrogen; power to gas.
  5. Socio-economy, environment and policy: Energy awareness; economical appraisal; energy conservation; life cycle assessment (LCA); circular economy; energy policy; hydrogen economy.

All the authors of accepted contributions at ABBS2020 with topics related to sustainable development are invited to submit manuscripts to Processes under the Special Issue “Advances Technologies in Biohydrogen and Bioprocesses”.

Prof. Dr. Shu-Yii Wu
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Chyi-How LAY
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Pau Loke Show
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biohydrogen
  • bioprocesses
  • sustainability
  • processes
  • green technology

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Using Graphene-Based Grease as a Heat Conduction Material for Hectowatt-Level LEDs: A Natural Convection Experiment
Processes 2021, 9(5), 847; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9050847 - 12 May 2021
Viewed by 198
Abstract
In this study, a self-adjusting concentration of graphene thermal grease was developed to reduce the contact surface thermal resistance of 50 W light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The purpose was to identify an important type of heat conduction material with a high thermal conductivity coefficient, [...] Read more.
In this study, a self-adjusting concentration of graphene thermal grease was developed to reduce the contact surface thermal resistance of 50 W light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The purpose was to identify an important type of heat conduction material with a high thermal conductivity coefficient, which can be applied to the contact surface of various high-heat sources or concentrated heat sources to achieve seamless heat transfer with an extremely low thermal resistance state. The contact heat conduction material conductivity reached the highest K value of 13.4 W/m·K with a 15 wt.% self-adjusting concentration of graphene grease. This material could continuously achieve a completely uniform and rapid thermal diffusion of heat energy. Therefore, we performed an analysis of chip-on-board light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with a highly concentrated heat source, which showed excellent heat dissipation under natural convection heat transfer. As such, this study achieved the natural convection mechanism and a heat sink volume thermal performance capacity of 473,750 mm3 for LEDs under 50 W, but those over 50 W require an enhanced forced convection solution and a heat sink volume thermal performance capacity between 473,750 mm3 and 947,500 mm3. If the heat source dissipation reaches 100 W, the volume capacity must be at least 947,500 mm3 for lighting equipment applications. In the experimental study, we also verified and analyzed the research data, including an analysis of the measured data, grease component wt.%, heat sink material selection, increase in heat sink volume, heat transfer path, and contact surface, a discrimination analysis of infrared thermal images, and an analysis of flow visualization, which were conducted to ensure quantitative and qualitative improvement, provide a mechanism for judging the technical performance, and provide research results to enable discussion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Technologies in Biohydrogen and Bioprocesses)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Synthesis of Large-Scale Bio-Hydrogen Network Using Waste Gas from Landfill and Anaerobic Digestion: A P-Graph Approach
Processes 2020, 8(5), 505; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr8050505 - 26 Apr 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1446
Abstract
Due to the expanding concern on cleaner production and sustainable development aspects, a technology shift is needed for the hydrogen production, which is commonly derived from natural gas. This work aims to synthesise a large-scale bio-hydrogen network in which its feedstock, i.e., bio-methane, [...] Read more.
Due to the expanding concern on cleaner production and sustainable development aspects, a technology shift is needed for the hydrogen production, which is commonly derived from natural gas. This work aims to synthesise a large-scale bio-hydrogen network in which its feedstock, i.e., bio-methane, is originated from landfill gas and palm oil mill effluent (POME). Landfill gas goes through a biogas upgrader where high-purity bio-methane is produced, while POME is converted to bio-methane using anaerobic digestor (AD). The generated bio-methane is then distributed to the corresponding hydrogen sink (e.g., oil refinery) through pipelines, and subsequently converted into hydrogen via steam methane reforming (SMR) process. In this work, P-graph framework is used to determine a supply network with minimum cost, while ensuring the hydrogen demands are satisfied. Two case studies in the West and East Coasts of Peninsular Malaysia are used to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed model. In Case Study 1, four scenarios on the West Coast have been considered, showing total cost saving ranging between 25.9% and 49.5%. This showed that aside from the positive environmental impact, the incorporation of bio-hydrogen supply can also be economically feasible. Such benefits can also be seen in Case Study 2, where the uptake of biogas from landfill and POME sources on the East Coast can lead to a 31% reduction on total network cost. In addition, the effect of bio-hydrogen supply network on carbon footprint reduction was analysed in this work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Technologies in Biohydrogen and Bioprocesses)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Green Pathway in Utilizing CO2 via Cycloaddition Reaction with Epoxide—A Mini Review
Processes 2020, 8(5), 548; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr8050548 - 08 May 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1453
Abstract
Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been anticipated as an ideal carbon building block for organic synthesis due to the noble properties of CO2, which are abundant renewable carbon feedstock, non-toxic nature, and contributing to a more sustainable use of resources. [...] Read more.
Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been anticipated as an ideal carbon building block for organic synthesis due to the noble properties of CO2, which are abundant renewable carbon feedstock, non-toxic nature, and contributing to a more sustainable use of resources. Several green and proficient routes have been established for chemical CO2 fixation. Among the prominent routes, this review epitomizes the reactions involving cycloaddition of epoxides with CO2 in producing cyclic carbonate. Cyclic carbonate has been widely used as a polar aprotic solvent, as an electrolyte in Li-ion batteries, and as precursors for various forms of chemical synthesis such as polycarbonates and polyurethanes. This review provides an overview in terms of the reaction mechanistic pathway and recent advances in the development of several classes of catalysts, including homogeneous organocatalysts (e.g., organic salt, ionic liquid, deep eutectic solvents), organometallic (e.g., mono-, bi-, and tri-metal salen complexes and non-salen complexes) and heterogeneous supported catalysts, and metal organic framework (MOF). Selection of effective catalysts for various epoxide substrates is very important in determining the cycloaddition operating condition. Under their catalytic systems, all classes of these catalysts, with regard to recent developments, can exhibit CO2 cycloaddition of terminal epoxide substrates at ambient temperatures and low CO2 pressure. Although highly desired conversion can be achieved for internal epoxide substrates, higher temperature and pressure are normally required. This includes fatty acid-derived terminal epoxides for oleochemical carbonate production. The production of fully renewable resources by employment of bio-based epoxy with biorefinery concept and potential enhancement of cycloaddition reactions are pointed out as well. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Technologies in Biohydrogen and Bioprocesses)
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