Special Issue "Polymeric Materials with Antibacterial Activity"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Javier González-Benito
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, IQMAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid, Spain
Interests: Design, preparation, and characterization of polymer-based multifunctional materials with (i) especial electrical properties and (ii) antibacterial activity. Characterization of polymers and composite materials; use of fluorescent probes and labels to monitor physico-chemical changes at a molecular scale. Atomic force microscopy: nanothermodeformation (linear coefficients of thermal expansion of polymer thin films), nanopiezodeformación. FTIR (middle and near range): structural, dynamics, and ageing phenomena studies. Solution blow spinning.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There has been a growing increase in the use of plastics in sectors such as the medicine and food industries. In the first case, the use of these polymers is focused on final applications like (i) devices or tools (catheters, packaging, drug dispensers, etc.) and (ii) materials for tissue regeneration or tissue engineering, for instance. In the case of the food industry, we are mainly talking about containers or thin films for food packaging. Obviously, the materials used in all these applications, besides being easily processable, should present the required properties for their final use such as bicompatibility and adecuate mechanical properties. However, researching in this field has become more activily focused on minimizing or canceling the growth of harmful bacteria that may be pathogens or bacteria that cause material degradation. For all these reasons, the necessity of designing new polymer-based materials that include antibacterial actions to finally achieve the most appropriate performance for the herein-considered applications is evident. There are several strategies to overcome this challenge: (i) the systhesis of new polymers or copolymers having especial functional groups with potential antibacterial action; (ii) the systhesis of polymer-based materials whose surfaces have special physico-chemical properties avoiding bacterial adhesion; (iii) the use of new processing methods to prepare materials with tailored topographies (controlled roughness for instance); (iv) the addition of active agents to polymers (synthetic or natural) with biocide actions (antibiotics and others); and (v) the addition to polymers of nanoparticles (coated or uncoated) such us Cu, Ag, TiO2, etc., with potential antibacterial action.

The aim of this Special Issue is to show the most recent advances on the design, synthesis, processing, characterization, properties, and performance of polymer-based materials with antibacterial actions.

Prof. Javier González-Benito
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Polymers
  • Nanocomposites
  • Antibacterial activity
  • Synthesis
  • Characterization
  • Biomedicine
  • Food packaging

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Improving Mildew Resistance of Soy Meal by Nano-Ag/TiO2, Zinc Pyrithione and 4-Cumylphenol
Polymers 2020, 12(1), 169; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12010169 - 09 Jan 2020
Abstract
As a byproduct from the soybean oil industry, soy meal can be reproduced into value-added products to replace formaldehyde as a plywood adhesive. However, the use of soy meal has been limited by its poor antifungal and antiseptic properties. In this work, three [...] Read more.
As a byproduct from the soybean oil industry, soy meal can be reproduced into value-added products to replace formaldehyde as a plywood adhesive. However, the use of soy meal has been limited by its poor antifungal and antiseptic properties. In this work, three kinds of material, namely nano-Ag/TiO2, zinc pyrithione, and 4-cumylphenol were applied to enhance the mildew resistance of soy meal via breakdown of the cellular structure of mildew. The fungi and mold resistance, morphology, thermal properties, and mechanism of the modified soy meal were evaluated. The success of the antifungal and antiseptic properties was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that all three kinds of material improved the fungi and mold resistance of soy meal, and sample B, which was modified with a compound of nano-Ag/TiO2 and zinc pyrithione, was the effective antifungal raw material for the soy-based adhesives. FTIR indicated that the great improvement of antifungal properties of soy meal modified with 4-cumylphenol might be caused by the reaction between COO– groups of soy protein. This research can help understand the effects of the chemical modification of nano-Ag/TiO2, zinc pyrithione, and 4-cumylphenol on soy meal, and the modified soy meal exhibits potential for utilization in the plywood adhesive industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymeric Materials with Antibacterial Activity)
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Open AccessArticle
Antibacterial Films Based on PVA and PVA–Chitosan Modified with Poly(Hexamethylene Guanidine)
Polymers 2019, 11(12), 2093; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11122093 - 13 Dec 2019
Abstract
In this study, thin, polymeric films consisting of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and chitosan (Ch) with the addition of poly(hexamethylene guanidine) (PHMG) were successfully prepared. The obtained materials were analyzed to determine their physicochemical and biocidal properties. In order to confirm the structure of [...] Read more.
In this study, thin, polymeric films consisting of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and chitosan (Ch) with the addition of poly(hexamethylene guanidine) (PHMG) were successfully prepared. The obtained materials were analyzed to determine their physicochemical and biocidal properties. In order to confirm the structure of PHMG, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) was applied, while in the case of the obtained films, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy with Fourier transform (FTIR-ATR) was used. The surface morphology of the polymer films was evaluated based on atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, the mechanical properties, color changes, and thermal stability of the obtained materials were determined. Microbiological tests were performed to evaluate the biocidal properties of the new materials with and without the addition of PHMG. These analyses confirmed the biocidal potential of films modified by PHMG and allowed for comparisons of their physicochemical properties with the properties of native films. In summary, films consisting of PVA and PHMG displayed higher antimicrobial potentials against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria in comparison to PVA:Ch-based films with the addition of PHMG. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymeric Materials with Antibacterial Activity)
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Open AccessArticle
New Antibacterial Silver(I) Coordination Polymers Based on a Flexible Ditopic Pyrazolyl-Type Ligand
Polymers 2019, 11(10), 1686; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11101686 - 15 Oct 2019
Abstract
In the last two decades, a tremendous amount of attention has been directed towards the design of antibacterial silver(I)-based materials, including coordination polymers (CPs) built up with a great variety of oxygen and nitrogen-containing ligands. Herein, a family of six new silver(I)-based CPs, [...] Read more.
In the last two decades, a tremendous amount of attention has been directed towards the design of antibacterial silver(I)-based materials, including coordination polymers (CPs) built up with a great variety of oxygen and nitrogen-containing ligands. Herein, a family of six new silver(I)-based CPs, having the general stoechiometric formula [Ag(H2DMPMB)(X)] (X = NO3, 1; CF3CO2, 2; CF3SO3, 3; BF4, 4; ClO4, 5; and PF6, 6) and incorporating the flexible ditopic pyrazolyl-type ligand 4,4′-bis((3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)methyl)biphenyl (H2DMPMB), has been prepared by the chemical precipitation method involving the reaction of silver(I) salts with H2DMPMB in the 1:1 molar ratio, in alcohols, or acetonitrile at room temperature for two-hours. The new silver(I)-based polymeric materials were characterized by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), elemental analysis (EA), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), allowing for the proposition that their structures comprise one-dimensional chains, with the silver(I) ions mostly assuming a T-shapped stereochemistry completed by the exo-bidentate ligands and counter-anions. The obtained silver(I) CPs showed a remarkable light insensitivity and stability in the air, are insoluble in water and in most common organic solvents, and possess appreciable thermal stabilities spanning the range 250–350 °C. The antibacterial activity of the obtained silver(I) CPs was tested against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) using the Tetrazolium/Formazan test (TTC), by measuring the bacterial viability at different time intervals. The complete reduction of both bacterial strains occurred after 24 h of exposure to all silver(I) CPs, the bacterial viability values for S. aureus reaching 8% for compounds 3, 5, and 6 after only two-hours. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymeric Materials with Antibacterial Activity)
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Open AccessArticle
Quantification Methods for Textile-Adhered Bacteria: Extraction, Colorimetric, and Microscopic Analysis
Polymers 2019, 11(10), 1666; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11101666 - 12 Oct 2019
Abstract
Quantification of bacteria adhered on porous, multi-layered fibers is a challenging task. The goal of this study is to compare different assessment procedures on counting textile-adhered bacteria, and to guide relevant analytical techniques. Three different methods were compared in measuring the amount of [...] Read more.
Quantification of bacteria adhered on porous, multi-layered fibers is a challenging task. The goal of this study is to compare different assessment procedures on counting textile-adhered bacteria, and to guide relevant analytical techniques. Three different methods were compared in measuring the amount of Escherichia coli (E. coli) adhered to polymeric film and fibrous nonwovens. In the extraction method, the adhered bacteria were released with the assistance of surfactant/enzyme, where the measurement was rather reproducible. For colorimetric method, stained bacteria enabled direct visualization without needing to detach cells from the surface, yet the linearity of color absorbency to cell counts was limited. The microscopic analysis provided direct observation of bacterial distribution over the surface, but accurate quantification was not possible for porous, fibrous surfaces. This study intends to help choosing a suitable test method to accurately quantify the textile-adhered bacteria, as well as broadly impact the research on anti-bioadhesive surfaces. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymeric Materials with Antibacterial Activity)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Authors: Dr. Kim

Title: Quantification Methods for Textile-Adhered Bacteria: Extraction, Colorimetric and Microscopic Analysis

Author: Dr. Tabacaru

Title: New antibacterial silver(I) coordination polymers based on a flexible ditopic pyrazolyl-type ligand

Author: Dr. Kwon

Title: Novel dental poly(methyl methacrylate) containing phytoncide for antifungal effects and inhibition of oral multispecies biofilm

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