Special Issue "Polymeric Colloidal Systems in Nanomedicine"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Leonard Atanase
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Dental Medicine, “Apollonia” University, Iasi, Romania
Interests: colloids; emulsions; micelles; amphiphilic copolymers; controlled radical polymerization; drug-loaded systems; polysaccharides.
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Gerard Riess
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratoire de Photochimie et Ingénierie Macromoléculaire, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Mulhouse, Université de Haute Alsace, Mulhouse Cedex, France
Interests: colloids; emulsions; copolymers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will integrate fundamental research with the practical application of colloidal systems in the field of nanomedicine. Of practical interest are the copolymer-based drug-loaded colloidal systems, such as micelles, polymersomes, nanogels, liposomes etc., with diameters in the range of 1 nm to 400 nm. Another domain of interest is that of functionalized colloidal systems with specific ligands for active targeted drug delivery.

The authors will try to explain the correlations between the molecular structure of the colloidal systems and the encapsulation efficiency and/or the drug release kinetics. In vitro analysis of cell lines will is welcome but not mandatory. Regular research articles and reviews will be accepted for publication in this Special Issue.

Prof. Leonard Atanase
Prof. Gerard Riess
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Polymeric colloids
  • Micelles
  • Nanogels
  • Liposomes
  • Nanoparticles
  • Drug delivery

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Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Article
Drug Delivery System Based on pH-Sensitive Biocompatible Poly(2-vinyl pyridine)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) Nanomicelles Loaded with Curcumin and 5-Fluorouracil
Polymers 2020, 12(7), 1450; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12071450 - 28 Jun 2020
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 1242
Abstract
Smart polymeric micelles (PMs) are of practical interest as nanocarriers for the encapsulation and controlled release of hydrophobic drugs. Two hydrophobic drugs, naturally-based curcumin (Cur) and synthetic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), were loaded into the PMs formed by a well-defined pH-sensitive poly(2-vinyl pyridine)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (P2VP [...] Read more.
Smart polymeric micelles (PMs) are of practical interest as nanocarriers for the encapsulation and controlled release of hydrophobic drugs. Two hydrophobic drugs, naturally-based curcumin (Cur) and synthetic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), were loaded into the PMs formed by a well-defined pH-sensitive poly(2-vinyl pyridine)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (P2VP90-b-PEO398) block copolymer. The influence of the drug loading on the micellar sizes was investigated by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and it appears that the size of the PMs increases from around 60 to 100 nm when Cur is loaded. On the contrary, the loading of the 5-FU has a smaller effect on the micellar sizes. This difference can be attributed to higher molar mass of Cur with respect to 5-FU but also to higher loading efficiency of Cur, 6.4%, compared to that of 5-FU, 5.8%. In vitro drug release was studied at pH 2, 6.8, and 7.4, and it was observed that the pH controls the release of both drugs. At pH 2, where the P2VP sequences from the “frozen-in” micellar core are protonated, the drug release efficiencies exceed 90%. Moreover, it was demonstrated, by in vitro assays, that these PMs are hemocompatible and biocompatible. Furthermore, the PMs protect the Cur against the photo-degradation, whereas the non-ionic PEO corona limits the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein on the surface. This study demonstrates that these pH-sensitive PMs are suitable for practical utilization as human-safe and smart, injectable drug delivery systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymeric Colloidal Systems in Nanomedicine)
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Article
Antitumoral Drug-Loaded Biocompatible Polymeric Nanoparticles Obtained by Non-Aqueous Emulsion Polymerization
Polymers 2020, 12(5), 1018; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12051018 - 30 Apr 2020
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 820
Abstract
Non-aqueous dispersions (NAD) with two types of polymeric nanoparticles (NPs), such as hydrophobic poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and hydrophilic cross-linked poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PNVP), were synthesized in the present study starting from monomer-in-silicone oil (PDMS) polymerizable non-aqueous emulsions stabilized with the same tailor-made PDMS-based block [...] Read more.
Non-aqueous dispersions (NAD) with two types of polymeric nanoparticles (NPs), such as hydrophobic poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and hydrophilic cross-linked poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PNVP), were synthesized in the present study starting from monomer-in-silicone oil (PDMS) polymerizable non-aqueous emulsions stabilized with the same tailor-made PDMS-based block copolymer. These NPs were loaded with CCisplatin, an antitumoral model drug, directly from the emulsion polymerization step, and it was observed that the presence of the drug leads only to a slight increase of the NPs size, from 120 to 150 nm. The drug release kinetics was evaluated at 37 °C in phosphate buffer at pH = 7.4 and it appeared that the drug release rate from the hydrophilic cross-linked PNVP-based NPs is higher than that from the hydrophobic PCL-based NPs. Moreover, haemolysis tests revealed the fact that these two types of NPs have a good compatibility with the blood. Furthermore, for both the free and drug-loaded NPs, the in vitro cytotoxicity and apoptosis was studied on two types of cancer cell lines, such as MCF-7 (breast cancer cell line) and A-375 (skin cancer cell line). Both types of NPs had no cytotoxic effect but, at a concentration of 500 μg/mL, presented an apoptotic effect similar to that of the free drug. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymeric Colloidal Systems in Nanomedicine)
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Article
Synthesis and Evaluation of 177Lu-DOTA-DN(PTX)-BN for Selective and Concomitant Radio and Drug—Therapeutic Effect on Breast Cancer Cells
Polymers 2019, 11(10), 1572; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11101572 - 27 Sep 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1200
Abstract
The peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a successful approach for selectively delivering radiation within tumor sites through specific recognition of radiolabeled peptides by overexpressed receptors on cancer cell surfaces. The efficacy of PRRT could be improved by using polymeric radio- and drug- therapy [...] Read more.
The peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a successful approach for selectively delivering radiation within tumor sites through specific recognition of radiolabeled peptides by overexpressed receptors on cancer cell surfaces. The efficacy of PRRT could be improved by using polymeric radio- and drug- therapy nanoparticles for a concomitant therapeutic effect on malignant cells. This research aimed to prepare and evaluate, a novel drug and radiation delivery nanosystem based on the 177Lu-labeled polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer (DN) loaded with paclitaxel (PTX) and functionalized on the surface with the Lys1Lys3(DOTA)-bombesin (BN) peptide for specific targeting to gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPr) overexpressed on breast cancer cells. DN was first conjugated covalently to BN and DOTA (chemical moiety for lutetium-177 complexing) and subsequently loaded with PTX. The characterization by microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, in-vitro drug delivery tests as well as in in-vitro and in-vivo cellular uptake of 177Lu-DOTA-DN(PTX)-BN by T47D breast cancer cells (GRPr-positive), indicated the formation of an improved delivery nanosystem with target-specific recognition by GRPr. Results of the 177Lu-DOTA-DN(PTX)-BN effect on T47D cell viability (1.3%, compared with 10.9% of 177Lu-DOTA-DN-BN and 14.0% of DOTA-DN-(PTX)-BN) demonstrated the concomitant radiotherapeutic and chemotherapeutic properties of the polymeric nanosystem as a potential agent for the treatment of GRPr-positive tumors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymeric Colloidal Systems in Nanomedicine)
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Article
Synthesis of Well-Defined Gold Nanoparticles Using Pluronic: The Role of Radicals and Surfactants in Nanoparticles Formation
Polymers 2019, 11(10), 1553; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11101553 - 24 Sep 2019
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1303
Abstract
Synthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNP) by reacting chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) and Pluronic F127 was thoroughly investigated. The rate of reduction of HAuCl4 and the yield and morphology of GNP strongly depended on the concentration of the reactants and sodium chloride, [...] Read more.
Synthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNP) by reacting chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) and Pluronic F127 was thoroughly investigated. The rate of reduction of HAuCl4 and the yield and morphology of GNP strongly depended on the concentration of the reactants and sodium chloride, as well as pH and temperature. Upon completion of the reaction heterogeneous mixtures of small GNP of defined shape and Pluronic aggregates were formed. GNP were separated from the excess of Pluronic by centrifugal filtration. Under optimized conditions the GNP were small (ca. 80 nm), uniform (PDI ~0.09), strongly negatively charged (ζ-potential −30 mV) and nearly spherical. They were stable in distilled water and phosphate-buffered saline. Purified GNP contained ~13% by weight of an organic component, yet presence of polypropylene oxide was not detected suggesting that Pluronic was not adsorbed on their surface. Analysis of the soluble products suggested that the copolymer undergoes partial degradation accompanied by cleavage of the C–O bonds and appearance of new primary hydroxyl groups. The reaction involves formation of free radicals and hydroperoxides depends on the oxygen concentration. GNP did not form at 4 °C when the micellization of Pluronic was abolished reinforcing the role of the copolymer self-assembly. In conclusion, this work provides insight into the mechanism of HAuCl4 reduction and GNP formation in the presence of Pluronic block copolymers. It is useful for improving the methods of manufacturing uniform and pure GNP that are needed as nanoscale building blocks in nanomedicine applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymeric Colloidal Systems in Nanomedicine)
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Article
Aptamer-Functionalized Liposomes as a Potential Treatment for Basal Cell Carcinoma
Polymers 2019, 11(9), 1515; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11091515 - 18 Sep 2019
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 1226
Abstract
More than one out of every three new cancers is a skin cancer, and the large majority are basal cell carcinomas (BCC). Targeted therapy targets the cancer’s specific genes, proteins, or tissue environment that contributes to cancer growth and survival and blocks the [...] Read more.
More than one out of every three new cancers is a skin cancer, and the large majority are basal cell carcinomas (BCC). Targeted therapy targets the cancer’s specific genes, proteins, or tissue environment that contributes to cancer growth and survival and blocks the growth as well as the spread of cancer cells while limiting damage to healthy cells. Therefore, in the present study AS1411 aptamer-functionalized liposomes for the treatment of BCC were obtained and characterized. Aptamer conjugation increased liposome size, suggesting that the presence of an additional hydrophilic molecule on the liposomal surface increased the hydrodynamic diameter. As expected, the negatively charged DNA aptamer reduced the surface potential of the liposomes. Vertical Franz diffusion cells with artificial membranes were used to evaluate the in vitro release of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The aptamer moieties increase the stability of the liposomes and act as a supplementary steric barrier leading to a lower cumulative amount of the released 5-FU. The in vitro cell viability, targeting capability and apoptotic effects of liposomes on the human dermal fibroblasts and on the basal cell carcinoma TE 354.T cell lines were also evaluated. The results indicate that the functionalized liposomes are more efficient as nanocarriers than the non-functionalized ones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymeric Colloidal Systems in Nanomedicine)
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Article
Tunable Composition of Dynamic Non-Viral Vectors over the DNA Polyplex Formation and Nucleic Acid Transfection
Polymers 2019, 11(8), 1313; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11081313 - 06 Aug 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1465
Abstract
Polyethylene glycol (PEG) functionalization of non-viral vectors represents a powerful tool through the formation of an overall surface charge shielding ability, which is fundamental for efficient nucleic acid delivery systems. The degree of non-viral vector PEGylation and the molecular weight of utilized PEG [...] Read more.
Polyethylene glycol (PEG) functionalization of non-viral vectors represents a powerful tool through the formation of an overall surface charge shielding ability, which is fundamental for efficient nucleic acid delivery systems. The degree of non-viral vector PEGylation and the molecular weight of utilized PEG is crucial since the excessive use of PEG units may lead to a considerable reduction of the DNA-binding capacity and, subsequently, in a reduction of in vitro transfection efficiency. Herein, we report a detailed study on a series of dynamic combinatorial frameworks (DCFs) containing PEGylated squalene, poly-(ethyleneglycol)-bis(3-aminopropyl) of different lengths, and branched low molecular weight polyethylenimine components, reversibly connected in hyperbranched structures, as efficient dynamic non-viral vectors. The obtained frameworks were capable of forming distinct supramolecular amphiphilic architectures, shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS), with sizes and stability depending on the length of PEG units. The interaction of PEGylated DCFs with nucleic acids was investigated by agarose gel retardation assay and atomic force microscopy (AFM), while their transfection efficiency (using pCS2+MT-Luc DNA as a reporter gene) and cytotoxicity were evaluated in HeLa cells. In addition, the data on the influence of the poly-(ethyleneglycol)-bis(3-aminopropyl) length in composition of designed frameworks over transfection efficiency and tolerance in human cells were analyzed and compared. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymeric Colloidal Systems in Nanomedicine)
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