Special Issue "Conjugated Oligomers and Polymer Nanomaterials"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Juhyun Park
E-Mail
Guest Editor
School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Institute of Energy Converting Soft Materials, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 06974, Republic of Korea
Interests: polymer materials; nanostructure; energy applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the first discovery and development of conductive polymers in the 20th century, conjugated oligomers and polymers with electronically delocalized backbones have been widely used not only for optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices, but also for a variety of recent applications that includes biomedical, energetic and catalytic materials and devices. This Special Issue is highly motivated by the enlarged scope of utilization of conjugated oligomers and polymers, and will pay significant attention to new synthetic technologies, supramolecular assemblies from the nano- to micrometer-scale, new routes for functionalization and modification, structure–property relationships, and biomedical and energy applications. Of course, this Special Issue should also include recent developments in optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices, covering all research fields based on conjugated oligomers and polymers.

Considering your prominent contributions to this field, I would like to cordially invite you to submit an article to this Special Issue. This Special Issue will publish full research papers, communications, and review articles. I would like to bring together a collection of comprehensive reviews from leading experts and up-to-date research from notable groups in the community.

The manuscript can be submitted now or up until the deadline, and will be published on an ongoing basis. I would greatly appreciate if you would consider being one of our authors.

Prof. Dr. Juhyun Park
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • New synthetic conjugated oligomers and polymers
  • Supramolecular assemblies and their structure–property relationships
  • Nanomaterials based on conjugated oligomers and polymers
  • Functionalization and modification of conjugated oligomers and polymers
  • Biomedical, optoelectronic and energy applications

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Narrowband Spontaneous Emission Amplification from a Conjugated Oligomer Thin Film
Polymers 2020, 12(1), 232; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12010232 - 17 Jan 2020
Abstract
In this paper, we studied the laser and optical properties of conjugated oligomer (CO) 1,4-bis(9-ethyl-3-carbazo-vinylene)-9,9-dihexyl-fluorene (BECV-DHF) thin films, which were cast onto a quartz substrate using a spin coating technique. BECV-DHF was dissolved in chloroform at different concentrations to produce thin films with [...] Read more.
In this paper, we studied the laser and optical properties of conjugated oligomer (CO) 1,4-bis(9-ethyl-3-carbazo-vinylene)-9,9-dihexyl-fluorene (BECV-DHF) thin films, which were cast onto a quartz substrate using a spin coating technique. BECV-DHF was dissolved in chloroform at different concentrations to produce thin films with various thicknesses. The obtained results from the absorption spectrum revealed one sharp peak at 403 nm and two broads at 375 and 428 nm. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra were recorded for different thin films made from different concentrations of the oligomer solution. The threshold, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) properties of the CO BECV-DHF thin films were studied in detail. The ASE spectrum was achieved at approximately 482.5 nm at a suitable concentration and sufficient pump energy. The time-resolved spectroscopy of the BECV-DHF films was demonstrated at different pump energies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conjugated Oligomers and Polymer Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Selective Ammonia-Sensing Platforms Based on a Solution-Processed Film of Poly(3-Hexylthiophene) and p-Doping Tris(Pentafluorophenyl)Borane
Polymers 2020, 12(1), 128; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12010128 - 05 Jan 2020
Abstract
Here, we fabricate ammonia sensors based on organic transistors by using poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) blended with tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane (TPFB) as an active layer. As TPFB is an efficient p-type dopant for P3HT, the current level of the blend films can be easily modulated by controlling [...] Read more.
Here, we fabricate ammonia sensors based on organic transistors by using poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) blended with tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane (TPFB) as an active layer. As TPFB is an efficient p-type dopant for P3HT, the current level of the blend films can be easily modulated by controlling the blend ratio. The devices exhibit significantly increased on-state and off-state current levels owing to the ohmic current originated from the large number of charge carriers when the active polymer layer contains TPFB with concentrations up to 20 wt % (P3HT:TPFB = 8:2). The current is decreased at 40 wt % of TPFB (P3HT:TPFB = 6:4). The P3HT:TPFB blend with a weight ratio of 9:1 exhibits the highest sensing performances for various concentrations of ammonia. The device exhibits an increased percentage current response compared to that of a pristine P3HT device. The current response of the P3HT:TPFB (9:1) device at 100 ppm of ammonia is as high as 65.8%, 3.2 times that of the pristine P3HT (20.3%). Furthermore, the sensor based on the blend exhibits a remarkable selectivity to ammonia with respect to acetone, methanol, and dichloromethane, owing to the strong interaction between the Lewis acid (TPFB) and Lewis base (ammonia). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conjugated Oligomers and Polymer Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Selective Wet-Etching of Polymer/Fullerene Blend Films for Surface- and Nanoscale Morphology-Controlled Organic Transistors and Sensitivity-Enhanced Gas Sensors
Polymers 2019, 11(10), 1682; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11101682 - 15 Oct 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Surface and nanoscale morphology of thin poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films are effectively controlled by blending the polymer with a soluble derivative of fullerene, and then selectively dissolving out the fullerene from the blend films. A combination of the polymer blending with fullerene and a [...] Read more.
Surface and nanoscale morphology of thin poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films are effectively controlled by blending the polymer with a soluble derivative of fullerene, and then selectively dissolving out the fullerene from the blend films. A combination of the polymer blending with fullerene and a use of diiodooctane (DIO) as a processing additive enhances the molecular ordering of P3HT through nanoscale phase separation, compared to the pristine P3HT. In organic thin-film transistors, such morphological changes in the blend induce a positive effect on the field-effect mobility, as the mobility is ~5–7 times higher than in the pristine P3HT. Simple dipping of the blend films in butyl acetate (BA) causes a selective dissolution of the small molecular component, resulting in a rough surface with nanoscale features of P3HT films. Chemical sensors utilizing these morphological features show an enhanced sensitivity in detection of gas-phase ammonia, water, and ethanol. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conjugated Oligomers and Polymer Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Ferrocene-Containing Conjugated Oligomers Synthesized by Acyclic Diene Metathesis Polymerization
Polymers 2019, 11(8), 1334; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11081334 - 12 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
A series of conjugated, symmetrical, and ferrocene-containing main-chain monomers was prepared following a gentle coupling reaction. Ferrocene-containing oligomers with all-trans-configured vinylene bonds could be synthesized via acyclic diene metathesis (ADMET) polymerization. These oligomers had a larger Stokes shift (2400 to 2600 [...] Read more.
A series of conjugated, symmetrical, and ferrocene-containing main-chain monomers was prepared following a gentle coupling reaction. Ferrocene-containing oligomers with all-trans-configured vinylene bonds could be synthesized via acyclic diene metathesis (ADMET) polymerization. These oligomers had a larger Stokes shift (2400 to 2600 cm−1) and both exhibited stable and reversible electrochemistry. Meanwhile, the copolymerization of 1,1’-bis[1-methyl-2-(4-vinylphenyl)ethenyl]ferrocene with 2,7-divinyl-9,9-dioctylfluorene was achieved. The structurally regular copolymers proved their optical and electrochemical properties. The fluorescence intensity of the copolymer gradually enhanced with the increasing number of fluorene units. At the same time, it was also found that the color of the copolymers had a significant change from yellow-green to red. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conjugated Oligomers and Polymer Nanomaterials)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Recent Innovation of Metal-Organic Frameworks for Carbon Dioxide Photocatalytic Reduction
Polymers 2019, 11(12), 2090; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11122090 - 13 Dec 2019
Abstract
The accumulation of carbon dioxide (CO2) pollutants in the atmosphere begets global warming, forcing us to face tangible catastrophes worldwide. Environmental affability, affordability, and efficient CO2 metamorphotic capacity are critical factors for photocatalysts; metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are one of the [...] Read more.
The accumulation of carbon dioxide (CO2) pollutants in the atmosphere begets global warming, forcing us to face tangible catastrophes worldwide. Environmental affability, affordability, and efficient CO2 metamorphotic capacity are critical factors for photocatalysts; metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are one of the best candidates. MOFs, as hybrid organic ligand and inorganic nodal metal with tailorable morphological texture and adaptable electronic structure, are contemporary artificial photocatalysts. The semiconducting nature and porous topology of MOFs, respectively, assists with photogenerated multi-exciton injection and adsorption of substrate proximate to void cavities, thereby converting CO2. The vitality of the employment of MOFs in CO2 photolytic reaction has emerged from the fact that they are not only an inherently eco-friendly weapon for pollutant extermination, but also a potential tool for alleviating foreseeable fuel crises. The excellent synergistic interaction between the central metal and organic linker allows decisive implementation for the design, integration, and application of the catalytic bundle. In this review, we presented recent MOF headway focusing on reports of the last three years, exhaustively categorized based on central metal-type, and novel discussion, from material preparation to photocatalytic, simulated performance recordings of respective as-synthesized materials. The selective CO2 reduction capacities into syngas or formate of standalone or composite MOFs with definite photocatalytic reaction conditions was considered and compared. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conjugated Oligomers and Polymer Nanomaterials)
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