Advanced Hybrid Composite Materials for Engineering and Biomedical Applications

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2023) | Viewed by 4830

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, IK Gujral Punjab Technical University, Kapurthala 144603, India
Interests: electric discharge machining; wire; tool wear, metal matrix composites; powder metallurgy; advanced machining
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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, IK Gujral Punjab Technical University, Kapurthala 144603, India
Interests: non-conventional machining; composites

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Guest Editor
Natural Composites Research Group Lab, Department of Materials and Production Engineering, The Sirindhorn International Thai-German Graduate School of Engineering (TGGS), King Mongkut’s University of Technology North Bangkok (KMUTNB), Bangkok, Thailand
Interests: natural fiber composites; natural fibers; bio-composites; green composites

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Guest Editor
School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Qingdao University of Technology, Qingdao 266520, China
Interests: grinding; minimum quantity lubrication; nanofluids minimum quantity lubrication

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Contemporary enterprises are embracing technological innovations, and emerging ideas in the manufacturing-industry in order to preserve and outperform from the perspective of value-addition, and quality at the affordable price. Manufacturing sectors are continually on the lookout for novel, innovative-materials due to the rapid evolution of technologies, and the desire for exceptional mechanical, thermal, abrasion, and physical-traits at a minimal-price. Composites has suddenly becoming extensively utilized around the entire globe owing to its remarkable characteristics and ease of processing. Since composite materials have been made up of 2 or more constituents, usually surpass matrix-materials. Among three most prevalent forms of composite includes, metal-matrix composites, polymer-matrix composites, and ceramic-matrix composites. Hybrid metallic-matrices or polymer-matrix composites, in particular, were developed to enhance properties via., reinforcing them with two distinct metallic particulates or fibers. Formerly, auto-maker companies including such Mercedes-Benz, Audi, B.M.W., and Volks-wagen had used composites to manufacture internal & external components. Furthermore, such composites are employed throughout the building construction, industrial applications, pharmaceutical, defense, and pharmaceutical industries, as well as the manufacture of suitcases, sport-goods, and protective helmets. The above special-section intends to disseminate innovative conjectural, operational, & methodological breakthroughs, considerable notable technological applications, case analysis, original research articles, and study findings in domains including such as fabrication, analysis, optimization, and experimentation on an advanced hybrid-composites for innumerable engineering and biomedical applications. One such special-issue encourages original articles, critical/comprehensive/mini-reviews, peer - reviewed scholarly case-study articles on hybrid composite materials, which do have numerous applicability in the automobile, building construction, aircraft, military, defense, electronics, aeronautical, pharmaceutical, and biomedical sectors. Amongst some of an emerging theme cluster include, but are not confined to, the following:

  • composite derived from natural fibres
  • techniques for producing bio-based polymer composites and their physicomechanical, structural, biomechanical, thermal, chemical, damping, tribological properties
  • machining behaviour with microstructural, topographic, surface morphological analysis
  • composites with something like a ceramic-matrix
  • hybrid biocompatible functional composites
  • conducting, and non-conducting composites
  • composites with such a hybrid metal-matrix material
  • polymer composites made from naturally occurring fibres that have been functionalized
  • polymer composites made from naturally occurring fibres that have been functionalized
  • reinforced polymers with fibre treatment
  • surfaces characteristics & machinability or processability of composite materials

Dr. Shubham Sharma
Dr. Jujhar Singh
Dr. Rushdan Ahmad Ilyas
Dr. Mavinkere Rangappa Sanjay
Prof. Dr. Changhe Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • metal-matrix composites
  • polymer-matrix composites
  • ceramic-matrix composites
  • hybrid composite
  • natural fibres
  • biocomposites
  • functional composites

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 3186 KiB  
Article
In Vivo Toxicity and Pharmacokinetics of Polytetrafluoroethylene Microplastics in ICR Mice
by Sijoon Lee, Kyung-Ku Kang, Soo-Eun Sung, Joo-Hee Choi, Minkyoung Sung, Keum-Yong Seong, Jian Lee, Subin Kang, Seong Yun Yang, Sunjong Lee, Kyeong-Ryoon Lee, Min-Soo Seo and KilSoo Kim
Polymers 2022, 14(11), 2220; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14112220 - 30 May 2022
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 4686
Abstract
The increased use of plastics has led to severe environmental pollution, particularly by microplastics—plastic particles 5 mm or less in diameter. These particles are formed by environmental factors such as weathering and ultraviolet irradiation, thereby making environmental pollution worse. This environmental pollution intensifies [...] Read more.
The increased use of plastics has led to severe environmental pollution, particularly by microplastics—plastic particles 5 mm or less in diameter. These particles are formed by environmental factors such as weathering and ultraviolet irradiation, thereby making environmental pollution worse. This environmental pollution intensifies human exposure to microplastics via food chains. Despite potential negative effects, few toxicity assessments on microplastics are available. In this study, two sizes of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) microplastics, approximately 5 μm and 10–50 μm, were manufactured and used for single and four-week repeated toxicity and pharmacokinetic studies. Toxicological effects were comprehensively evaluated with clinical signs, body weight, food and water consumption, necropsy findings, and histopathological and clinical-pathological examinations. Blood collected at 15, 30 60, and 120 min after a single administration of microplastics were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. In the toxicity evaluation of single and four-week repeated oral administration of PTFE microplastics, no toxic changes were observed. Therefore, the lethal dose 50 (LD50) and no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) of PTFE microplastics in ICR mice were established as 2000 mg/kg or more. PTFE microplastics were not detected in blood, so pharmacokinetic parameters could not be calculated. This study provides new insight into the long-term toxicity and pharmacokinetics of PTFE microplastics. Full article
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17 pages, 4555 KiB  
Article
Chitosan Membrane Containing Copaiba Oil (Copaifera spp.) for Skin Wound Treatment
by Sheila Barbosa Paranhos, Elisângela da Silva Ferreira, Caio Augusto de Almeida Canelas, Simone Patrícia Aranha da Paz, Marcele Fonseca Passos, Carlos Emmerson Ferreira da Costa, Alisson Clay Rios da Silva, Sergio Neves Monteiro and Verônica Scarpini Candido
Polymers 2022, 14(1), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14010035 - 23 Dec 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3284
Abstract
The interaction of copaiba oil in the polymer matrix of chitosan can produce a favorable synergistic effect and potentiate properties. Indeed, the bioactive principles present in copaiba oil have anti-inflammatory and healing action. In the present work, chitosan membranes containing different contents of [...] Read more.
The interaction of copaiba oil in the polymer matrix of chitosan can produce a favorable synergistic effect and potentiate properties. Indeed, the bioactive principles present in copaiba oil have anti-inflammatory and healing action. In the present work, chitosan membranes containing different contents of copaiba oil copaíba (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0% (v/v)) were for the first time investigated. The membranes were developed by the casting method and analyzed for their morphology, degree of intumescence, moisture content, contact angle, Scanning Electron Microscope, and X-ray diffractometry. These chitosan/copaiba oil porous membranes disclosed fluid absorption capacity, hydrophilic surface, and moisture. In addition, the results showed that chitosan membranes with the addition of 1.0% (v/v) of copaiba oil presented oil drops with larger diameters, around 123.78 μm. The highest fluid absorption indexes were observed in chitosan membranes containing 0.1 and 0.5% (v/v) of copaiba oil. In addition, the copaiba oil modified the crystalline structure of chitosan. Such characteristics are expected to favor wound treatment. However, biological studies are necessary for the safe use of chitosan/copaiba oil membrane as a biomaterial. Full article
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