New Strategies for the Application of Biopolymer-Based Materials

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Circular and Green Polymer Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2024) | Viewed by 3695

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Manchester Fashion Institute, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M1 5QA, UK
Interests: fashion and textile sustainability; digital prototyping; sustainable materials and process innovation; and smart textiles
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Guest Editor
Occupational Safety Health and Environment, Department of Public Health, University of Doha for Science and Technology, Doha, Qatar
Interests: occupational health; climate change adaptation and workers’ health and safety; safety climate and safety culture; sustainable waste management
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Textile Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, India
Interests: eco friendly finishing of textiles; processing of natural fibres; garment sizing; textile- microbe interactions; assistive garments; product development

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Guest Editor
Department of Fashion and Textiles, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK
Interests: technical textiles; nonwovens; textile dyeing and finishing; plasma treatment; polymer and fibre science; medical textiles; fibre-reinforced composites

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biopolymers are an indispensable part of the human body, life, and society. Common applications of biopolymers include the manufacture of consumer goods, including textiles and clothing; the manufacture of foods and packaging materials; biomedical uses in drug delivery systems, wound closure, healing products, and surgical implants; and as scaffolds for tissue engineering. This Special Issue covers the following topics (however, this list is by no means exhaustive):

  • Advances in the production and processing of biopolymers for textile and fashion applications;
  • Latest developments in biopolymer use in the food and packaging industries;
  • State-of-the-art developments in biomedical applications of biopolymers;
  • Advances in biopolymer-based composite materials for technical applications;
  • Mechanical engineering aspects of biopolymers and biopolymer-based materials;
  • Chemical engineering, chemical analysis and characterisation of biopolymers and biopolymer-based materials;
  • Challenges in industrial processing of biopolymers and biopolymer-based materials at a large scale;
  • Additive manufacturing and rapid prototyping with biopolymers;
  • Sustainability (environmental, social and economic) issues related to the processing and applications of biopolymers;
  • End-of-life options for biopolymers, including thermos-mechanical recycling, chemical recycling and biodegradation processes;
  • Carbon footprint, water footprint, acidification potential, eutrophication potential, ozone layer depletion potential, photochemical smog and human toxicity potential associated with processing and uses of biopolymers and biopolymer-based composite materials.

We cordially invite senior and early career researchers, academics, industry professionals and policy makers to contribute either original or review articles to this multidisciplinary Special Issue.

A guide for authors and other relevant information for the submission of manuscripts can be found on the journal’s website.

Dr. Abu Sadat Muhammad Sayem
Dr. Haruna Musa Moda
Prof. Dr. Deepti Gupta
Prof. Dr. Parikshit Goswami
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • protein
  • cellulose
  • textiles
  • food
  • polymerisation
  • drug delivery
  • scaffold
  • composite materials
  • tissue engineering
  • 3D printing
  • recycling
  • sustainability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

23 pages, 7344 KiB  
Article
Enhancing the Weld Quality of Polylactic Acid Biomedical Materials Using Rotary Friction Welding
by Chil-Chyuan Kuo, Hua-Xhin Liang, Song-Hua Huang and Shih-Feng Tseng
Polymers 2024, 16(7), 991; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16070991 - 4 Apr 2024
Viewed by 841
Abstract
Polylactic acid (PLA) stands out as a biomaterial with immense potential, primarily owing to its innate biodegradability. Conventional methods for manufacturing PLA encompass injection molding or additive manufacturing (AM). Yet, the fabrication of sizable medical devices often necessitates fragmenting them into multiple components [...] Read more.
Polylactic acid (PLA) stands out as a biomaterial with immense potential, primarily owing to its innate biodegradability. Conventional methods for manufacturing PLA encompass injection molding or additive manufacturing (AM). Yet, the fabrication of sizable medical devices often necessitates fragmenting them into multiple components for printing, subsequently requiring reassembly to accommodate the constraints posed by the dimensions of the AM platform. Typically, laboratories resort to employing nuts and bolts for the assembly of printed components into expansive medical devices. Nonetheless, this conventional approach of jointing is susceptible to the inherent risk of bolts and nuts loosening or dislodging amid the reciprocating movements inherent to sizable medical apparatus. Hence, investigation into the joining techniques for integrating printed components into expansive medical devices has emerged as a critical focal point within the realm of research. The main objective is to enhance the joint strength of PLA polymer rods using rotary friction welding (RFW). The mean bending strength of welded components, fabricated under seven distinct rotational speeds, surpasses that of the underlying PLA substrate material. The average bending strength improvement rate of welding parts fabricated by RFW with three-stage transformation to 4000 rpm is about 41.94% compared with the average bending strength of PLA base material. The average surface hardness of the weld interface is about 1.25 to 3.80% higher than the average surface hardness of the PLA base material. The average surface hardness of the weld interface performed by RFW with variable rotational speed is higher than the average surface hardness of the weld interface performed at a fixed rotating friction speed. The temperature rise rate and maximum temperature recorded during RFW in the X-axis of the CNC turning machine at the outer edge of the welding part surpassed those observed in the internal temperature of the welding part. Remarkably, the proposed method in this study complies with the Sustainable Development Goals due to its high energy efficiency and low environmental pollution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Strategies for the Application of Biopolymer-Based Materials)
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17 pages, 3597 KiB  
Article
Application of Green Polymeric Nanocomposites for Enhanced Oil Recovery by Spontaneous Imbibition from Carbonate Reservoirs
by Yaser Ahmadi, Mohamed Arselene Ayari, Meysam Olfati, Seyyed Hossein Hosseini, Amith Khandakar, Behzad Vaferi and Martin Olazar
Polymers 2023, 15(14), 3064; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15143064 - 17 Jul 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1355
Abstract
This study experimentally investigates the effect of green polymeric nanoparticles on the interfacial tension (IFT) and wettability of carbonate reservoirs to effectively change the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) parameters. This experimental study compares the performance of xanthan/magnetite/SiO2 nanocomposites (NC) and several green [...] Read more.
This study experimentally investigates the effect of green polymeric nanoparticles on the interfacial tension (IFT) and wettability of carbonate reservoirs to effectively change the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) parameters. This experimental study compares the performance of xanthan/magnetite/SiO2 nanocomposites (NC) and several green materials, i.e., eucalyptus plant nanocomposites (ENC) and walnut shell ones (WNC) on the oil recovery with performing series of spontaneous imbibition tests. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX), and BET (Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller) surface analysis tests are also applied to monitor the morphology and crystalline structure of NC, ENC, and WNC. Then, the IFT and contact angle (CA) were measured in the presence of these materials under various reservoir conditions and solvent salinities. It was found that both ENC and WNC nanocomposites decreased CA and IFT, but ENC performed better than WNC under different salinities, namely, seawater (SW), double diluted salted (2 SW), ten times diluted seawater (10 SW), formation water (FW), and distilled water (DIW), which were applied at 70 °C, 2000 psi, and 0.05 wt.% nanocomposites concentration. Based on better results, ENC nanofluid at salinity concentrations of 10 SW and 2 SW ENC were selected for the EOR of carbonate rocks under reservoir conditions. The contact angles of ENC nanocomposites at the salinities of 2 SW and 10 SW were 49 and 43.4°, respectively. Zeta potential values were −44.39 and −46.58 for 2 SW and 10 SW ENC nanofluids, which is evidence of the high stability of ENC nanocomposites. The imbibition results at 70 °C and 2000 psi with 0.05 wt.% ENC at 10 SW and 2 SW led to incremental oil recoveries of 64.13% and 60.12%, respectively, compared to NC, which was 46.16%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Strategies for the Application of Biopolymer-Based Materials)
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