Regulation of Postharvest Fruit and Vegetable Quality Deterioration

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Horticultural Science and Ornamental Plants".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2022) | Viewed by 7197

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Postharvest Science of Fruits and Vegetables, College of Horticulture, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, China
Interests: fruit and vegetable ripening and senescence; abiotic tolerance; postharvest technology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Postharvest fleshy fruits and vegetables are still living organisms, remain metabolically active and undergo complex biological processes, which are prone to ripening and senescence, resulting in quality deterioration and commodity value loss. Therefore, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying ripening and senescence, followed by quality deterioration, would help to maintain postharvest commercial quality, and to improve management to minimize postharvest loss. Fruit and vegetable ripening and senescence are finely governed by many aspects consisting of genetic factors, phytohormones and environmental factors, which act coordinately in a fine-tuned network determining the specific expression of ripening- and senescence-associated genes. Among the genetic basis, transcription factors (TFs) play an indispensable role in ripening and senescence, such as ERF, NAC and WRKY. These TFs play essential functions in various plant biological processes, and the activities of TFs are controlled by DNA/RNA methylation or post-translation modification. Thus, the scope of this Special Issue is to cover the regulatory mechanism of postharvest fruit and vegetable quality deterioration, particularly focusing on phytohormones and environmental factors, not only to shed new light on the regulatory mechanism of quality deterioration after harvest but also to contribute to improving the technology of maintaining the shelf life and commercial value of postharvest fruits and vegetables.

Prof. Jianye Chen
Dr. Zhongqi Fan
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • fruit and vegetable
  • postharvest quality
  • postharvest technology
  • ripening and senescence
  • phytohormone
  • environmental factor
  • transcriptional regulation
  • post-translation modification

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 6537 KiB  
Article
Putrescine Treatment Delayed the Softening of Postharvest Blueberry Fruit by Inhibiting the Expression of Cell Wall Metabolism Key Gene VcPG1
by Xiangchong Song, Hongyu Dai, Siyao Wang, Shujuan Ji, Xin Zhou, Jianan Li and Qian Zhou
Plants 2022, 11(10), 1356; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11101356 - 19 May 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1730
Abstract
The postharvest shelf life of blueberries is very short at room temperature owing to softening, which reduces their edible value. Putrescine (Put) plays an important role in maintaining the firmness and prolonging the storage time of fruits. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between [...] Read more.
The postharvest shelf life of blueberries is very short at room temperature owing to softening, which reduces their edible value. Putrescine (Put) plays an important role in maintaining the firmness and prolonging the storage time of fruits. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between Put and the cell wall metabolism and their roles in the postharvest softening of blueberry. Harvested blueberry fruit was immersed in 1 mM Put aqueous solution for 10 min. After treatment, the blueberries were stored at 20 ± 0.5 °C and 80% relative humidity for 10 days. The results show that Put delayed the softening of the blueberries. Compared to the control, the blueberry fruit treated with Put showed higher levels of firmness and protopectin. Moreover, the activity and expression levels of the cell wall metabolism enzymes were markedly inhibited by the Put treatment, including polygalacturonase (PG), β−galactosylase (β−Gal), and β−glucosidase (β−Glu). The Put treatment promoted the expression of the Put synthesis gene VcODC and inhibited the expression of the Put metabolism gene VcSPDS. Further tests showed that the fruit firmness decreased significantly after the overexpression of VcPG1, which verified that VcPG1 is a key gene for fruit softening. The key transcription factors of fruit softening were preliminarily predicted and the expressions were analyzed, laying a foundation for the subsequent study of transcriptional regulation. These results indicate that Put delays the softening of postharvest blueberry by restraining the cell wall metabolism and maintaining the fruit firmness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Regulation of Postharvest Fruit and Vegetable Quality Deterioration)
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14 pages, 3671 KiB  
Article
Metabolic Effects of Violet Light on Spoilage Bacteria from Fresh-Cut Pakchoi during Postharvest Stage
by Yuchen Zhang, Zhaoyang Ding and Jing Xie
Plants 2022, 11(3), 267; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11030267 - 19 Jan 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1559
Abstract
Pakchoi (Brassica rapa L. Chinensis) is an important vegetable in Asia. Pseudomonas palleroniana is one of the specific spoilage organisms (SSOs) of fresh-cut pakchoi. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes to the endogenous metabolic spectrum of violet light [...] Read more.
Pakchoi (Brassica rapa L. Chinensis) is an important vegetable in Asia. Pseudomonas palleroniana is one of the specific spoilage organisms (SSOs) of fresh-cut pakchoi. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes to the endogenous metabolic spectrum of violet light (405 nm) with regard to food spoilage bacteria from fresh-cut pakchoi using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In this study, P. palleroniana samples were treated with violet light at 4 °C, and the maximum dose was 133.63 J/cm2. The results revealed that 153 metabolites and 83 pathways significantly changed compared to the control group, which indicated that light treatment may lead to ROS accumulation in cells, inducing oxidative stress and the excessive consumption of ATP. However, the increased content of aromatic amino acids and the decreased anabolism of some amino acids and nucleotides might be a form of self-protection by reducing energy consumption, thus contributing to the improvement of the tolerance of cells to illumination. These results provide new insights into the antibacterial mechanism of P. palleroniana with regard to metabolism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Regulation of Postharvest Fruit and Vegetable Quality Deterioration)
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14 pages, 4624 KiB  
Article
Study of Postharvest Quality and Antioxidant Capacity of Freshly Cut Amaranth after Blue LED Light Treatment
by Siyuan Jin, Zhaoyang Ding and Jing Xie
Plants 2021, 10(8), 1614; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10081614 - 6 Aug 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2855
Abstract
Freshly cut vegetables are susceptible to microbial contamination and oxidation during handling and storage. Hence, light-emitting diode technology can effectively inhibit microbial growth and improve antioxidant enzyme activity. In this paper, the freshly cut amaranth was treated with different intensities of blue light-emitting [...] Read more.
Freshly cut vegetables are susceptible to microbial contamination and oxidation during handling and storage. Hence, light-emitting diode technology can effectively inhibit microbial growth and improve antioxidant enzyme activity. In this paper, the freshly cut amaranth was treated with different intensities of blue light-emitting diode (LED460nm) over 12 days. Chlorophyll content, ascorbic acid content, antioxidant capacity, antioxidant enzymes activity, the changes in microbial count, and sensorial evaluation were measured to analyze the effects of LED treatment on the amaranth. Blue LED460nm light irradiation improved the vital signs of the samples and extended the shelf life by 2–3 days. The AsA–GSH cycle was effectively activated with the irradiation of 30 μmol/(m2·s) blue LED460nm light. According to the results, the LED460nm light could retard the growth of colonies and the main spoilage bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, of freshly cut amaranth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Regulation of Postharvest Fruit and Vegetable Quality Deterioration)
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