Special Issue "Medicinal Plants and Natural Product Research"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 August 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Milan S. Stankovic
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Science, University of Kragujevac, Str. Radoja Domanovića No. 12, 34000 Kragujevac, Serbia
Tel. +381-34-336223 (ext. 270); Fax: + 381 34 335 040
Interests: plant biology and ecology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For very long time, a large number of plants have been used in medicinal therapy, as well as for food and beverage preparation. Due to their natural origins, the treatment products obtained from medicinal plants are of greater benefit in comparison to synthetic ones. The main carriers of the biological activity of medicinal plants are plant secondary metabolites, as products of a specifically conceived secondary metabolism, which is a continuation of the essential primary metabolism. On the basis of their main roles in plant life, quantitative and qualitative composition of secondary metabolites is in accordance with a variety of environmental influences. In addition to their role in the process of environmental interaction, secondary metabolites from plants express their biological activity in both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Based on these facts, complex studies of medicinal plants, from habitats to the validation of natural products, are interesting for more scientific and practical disciplines. This Special Issue of Plants will contribute to knowledge of medicinal plants from several aspects, such as:

  • Morphology and anatomy
  • Diversity and phytogeography
  • Physiology and ecology
  • Methodology of cultivation and collection
  • Medicinal plants in traditional and modern folk medicine
  • Diversity of plant secondary metabolites
  • Methods for quantitative and qualitative analysis of plant secondary metabolites
  • Isolation and purification of plant secondary metabolites
  • Methods for chemical modification of the active substances from medicinal plants
  • In vitro and in vivo biological activity of plant secondary metabolites

Dr. Milan S. Stankovic
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • medicinal plants
  • natural products
  • ethnobotany
  • phytochemistry
  • biological effects

Published Papers (18 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Chiricaspi (Brunfelsia grandiflora, Solanaceae), a Pharmacologically Promising Plant
Plants 2018, 7(3), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants7030067 - 18 Aug 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
This study’s objective was to evaluate the rescued traditional knowledge about the chiricaspi (Brunfelsia grandiflora s.l.), obtained in an isolated Canelo-Kichwa Amazonian community in the Pastaza province (Ecuador). This approach demonstrates well the value of biodiversity conservation in an endangered ecoregion. The [...] Read more.
This study’s objective was to evaluate the rescued traditional knowledge about the chiricaspi (Brunfelsia grandiflora s.l.), obtained in an isolated Canelo-Kichwa Amazonian community in the Pastaza province (Ecuador). This approach demonstrates well the value of biodiversity conservation in an endangered ecoregion. The authors describe the ancestral practices that remain in force today. They validated them through bibliographic revisions in data megabases, which presented activity and chemical components. The authors also propose possible routes for the development of new bioproducts based on the plant. In silico research about new drug design based on traditional knowledge about this species can produce significant progress in specific areas of childbirth, anesthesiology, and neurology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Natural Product Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Separation, Identification, and Antidiabetic Activity of Catechin Isolated from Arbutus unedo L. Plant Roots
Plants 2018, 7(2), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants7020031 - 12 Apr 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
Phytopharmaceuticals play an essential role in medicine, since the need to investigate highly effective and safe drugs for the treatment of diabetes mellitus disease remains a significant challenge for modern medicine. Arbutus unedo L. root has various therapeutic properties, and has been used [...] Read more.
Phytopharmaceuticals play an essential role in medicine, since the need to investigate highly effective and safe drugs for the treatment of diabetes mellitus disease remains a significant challenge for modern medicine. Arbutus unedo L. root has various therapeutic properties, and has been used widely in the traditional medicine as an antidiabetic agent. The current study aimed to isolate the pharmacologically active compound from A. unedo roots using accelerated solvent extraction technology, to determine its chemical structure using different instrumental analytical methods, and also to evaluate the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. The roots of A. unedo were exhaustively extracted by high-pressure static extraction using the Zippertex® technology (Dionex-ASE, Paris, France), and the extract was mixed with XAD-16 resin to reach quantifiable amounts of active compounds which were identified by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), 1H NMR (300 MHz), and 13C NMR. The antidiabetic activity of the isolated compound was evaluated using the α-glucosidase inhibitory assay. The active compound was isolated, and its structure was identified as catechin using instrumental analysis.The results revealed that the isolated compound has potential α-glucosidase inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 87.55 ± 2.23 μg/mL greater than acarbose. This was used as a positive control, which has an IC50 value of 199.53 ± 1.12 μg/mL. According to the results achieved, the roots of A. unedo were considered the best source of catechin and the Zippertex® technology method of extraction is the best method for isolation of this therapeutic active compound. In addition, the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity results confirmed the traditional use of A. unedo roots as an antidiabetic agent. Future clinical trials and investigations of antidiabetic and other pharmacological effects such as anticancer are required. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Natural Product Research)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Influence of Boiling, Steaming and Frying of Selected Leafy Vegetables on the In Vitro Anti-inflammation Associated Biological Activities
Plants 2018, 7(1), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants7010022 - 16 Mar 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of cooking (boiling, steaming, and frying) on anti-inflammation associated properties in vitro of six popularly consumed green leafy vegetables in Sri Lanka, namely: Centella asiatica, Cassia auriculata, Gymnema lactiferum, [...] Read more.
The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of cooking (boiling, steaming, and frying) on anti-inflammation associated properties in vitro of six popularly consumed green leafy vegetables in Sri Lanka, namely: Centella asiatica, Cassia auriculata, Gymnema lactiferum, Olax zeylanica, Sesbania grnadiflora, and Passiflora edulis. The anti-inflammation associated properties of methanolic extracts of cooked leaves were evaluated using four in vitro biological assays, namely, hemolysis inhibition, proteinase inhibition, protein denaturation inhibition, and lipoxygenase inhibition. Results revealed that the frying of all the tested leafy vegetables had reduced the inhibition abilities of protein denaturation, hemolysis, proteinase, and lipoxygenase activities when compared with other food preparation methods. Steaming significantly increased the protein denaturation and hemolysis inhibition in O. zeylanica and P. edulis. Steaming of leaves increased inhibition activity of protein denaturation in G. lactiferum (by 44.8%) and P. edulis (by 44%); hemolysis in C. asiatica, C. auriculata, and S. grandiflora; lipoxygenase inhibition ability in P. edulis (by 50%), C. asiatica (by 400%), and C. auriculata leaves (by 250%); proteinase inhibition in C. auriculata (100%) when compared with that of raw leaves. In general, steaming and boiling in contrast to frying protect the health-promoting properties of the leafy vegetables. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Natural Product Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Immunomodulatory and Inhibitory Effect of Immulina®, and Immunloges® in the Ig-E Mediated Activation of RBL-2H3 Cells. A New Role in Allergic Inflammatory Responses
Plants 2018, 7(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants7010013 - 26 Feb 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
Immulina®, a high-molecular-weight polysaccharide extract from the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis (Spirulina) is a potent activator of innate immune cells. On the other hand, it is well documented that Spirulina exerts anti-inflammatory effects and showed promising effects with respect to [...] Read more.
Immulina®, a high-molecular-weight polysaccharide extract from the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis (Spirulina) is a potent activator of innate immune cells. On the other hand, it is well documented that Spirulina exerts anti-inflammatory effects and showed promising effects with respect to the relief of allergic rhinitis symptoms. Taking into account these findings, we decided to elucidate whether Immulina®, and immunLoges® (a commercial available multicomponent nutraceutical with Immulina® as a main ingredient) beyond immune-enhancing effects, might also exert inhibitory effects in the induced allergic inflammatory response and on histamine release from RBL-2H3 mast cells. Our findings show that Immulina® and immunLoges® inhibited the IgE-antigen complex-induced production of TNF-α, IL-4, leukotrienes and histamine. The compound 48/80 stimulated histamine release in RBL-2H3 cells was also inhibited. Taken together, our results showed that Immulina® and immunLoges® exhibit anti-inflammatory properties and inhibited the release of histamine from mast cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Natural Product Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Genus-Specific Real-Time PCR and HRM Assays to Distinguish Liriope from Ophiopogon Samples
Plants 2017, 6(4), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants6040053 - 26 Oct 2017
Cited by 1
Abstract
Liriope and Ophiopogon species have a long history of use as traditional medicines across East Asia. They have also become widely used around the world for ornamental and landscaping purposes. The morphological similarities between Liriope and Ophiopogon taxa have made the taxonomy of [...] Read more.
Liriope and Ophiopogon species have a long history of use as traditional medicines across East Asia. They have also become widely used around the world for ornamental and landscaping purposes. The morphological similarities between Liriope and Ophiopogon taxa have made the taxonomy of the two genera problematic and caused confusion about the identification of individual specimens. Molecular approaches could be a useful tool for the discrimination of these two genera in combination with traditional methods. Seventy-five Liriope and Ophiopogon samples from the UK National Plant Collections of Ophiopogon and Liriope were analyzed. The 5′ end of the DNA barcode region of the gene for the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rbcLa) was used for the discrimination of the two genera. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) between the two genera allowed the development of discriminatory tests for genus-level identification based on specific PCR and high-resolution melt curve (HRM) assays. The study highlights the advantage of incorporating DNA barcoding methods into plant identification protocols and provides simple assays that could be used for the quality assurance of commercially traded plants and herbal drugs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Natural Product Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
An Investigation of the Antioxidant Capacity in Extracts from Moringa oleifera Plants Grown in Jamaica
Plants 2017, 6(4), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants6040048 - 23 Oct 2017
Cited by 7
Abstract
Moringa oleifera trees grow well in Jamaica and their parts are popularly used locally for various purposes and ailments. Antioxidant activities in Moringa oleifera samples from different parts of the world have different ranges. This study was initiated to determine the antioxidant activity [...] Read more.
Moringa oleifera trees grow well in Jamaica and their parts are popularly used locally for various purposes and ailments. Antioxidant activities in Moringa oleifera samples from different parts of the world have different ranges. This study was initiated to determine the antioxidant activity of Moringa oleifera grown in Jamaica. Dried and milled Moringa oleifera leaves were extracted with ethanol/water (4:1) followed by a series of liquid–liquid extractions. The antioxidant capacities of all fractions were tested using a 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. IC50 values (the amount of antioxidant needed to reduce 50% of DPPH) were then determined and values for the extracts ranged from 177 to 4458 μg/mL. Extracts prepared using polar solvents had significantly higher antioxidant capacities than others and may have clinical applications in any disease characterized by a chronic state of oxidative stress, such as sickle cell anemia. Further work will involve the assessment of these extracts in a sickle cell model of oxidative stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Natural Product Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Proanthocyanidin Characterization, Antioxidant and Cytotoxic Activities of Three Plants Commonly Used in Traditional Medicine in Costa Rica: Petiveria alliaceae L., Phyllanthus niruri L. and Senna reticulata Willd.
Plants 2017, 6(4), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants6040050 - 19 Oct 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
The phenolic composition of aerial parts from Petiveria alliaceae L., Phyllanthus niruri L. and Senna reticulata Willd., species commonly used in Costa Rica as traditional medicines, was studied using UPLC-ESI-TQ-MS on enriched-phenolic extracts. Comparatively, higher values of total phenolic content (TPC), as measured [...] Read more.
The phenolic composition of aerial parts from Petiveria alliaceae L., Phyllanthus niruri L. and Senna reticulata Willd., species commonly used in Costa Rica as traditional medicines, was studied using UPLC-ESI-TQ-MS on enriched-phenolic extracts. Comparatively, higher values of total phenolic content (TPC), as measured by the Folin-Ciocalteau method, were observed for P. niruri extracts (328.8 gallic acid equivalents/g) than for S. reticulata (79.30 gallic acid equivalents/g) whereas P. alliaceae extract showed the lowest value (13.45 gallic acid equivalents/g). A total of 20 phenolic acids and proanthocyanidins were identified in the extracts, including hydroxybenzoic acids (benzoic, 4-hydroxybenzoic, gallic, prochatechuic, salicylic, syringic and vanillic acids); hydroxycinnamic acids (caffeic, ferulic, and p-coumaric acids); and flavan-3-ols monomers [(+)-catechin and (−)-epicatechin)]. Regarding proanthocyanidin oligomers, five procyanidin dimers (B1, B2, B3, B4, and B5) and one trimer (T2) are reported for the first time in P. niruri, as well as two propelargonidin dimers in S. reticulata. Additionally, P. niruri showed the highest antioxidant DPPH and ORAC values (IC50 of 6.4 μg/mL and 6.5 mmol TE/g respectively), followed by S. reticulata (IC50 of 72.9 μg/mL and 2.68 mmol TE/g respectively) and P. alliaceae extract (IC50 >1000 μg/mL and 1.32 mmol TE/g respectively). Finally, cytotoxicity and selectivity on gastric AGS and colon SW20 adenocarcinoma cell lines were evaluated and the best values were also found for P. niruri (SI = 2.8), followed by S. reticulata (SI = 2.5). Therefore, these results suggest that extracts containing higher proanthocyanidin content also show higher bioactivities. Significant positive correlation was found between TPC and ORAC (R2 = 0.996) as well as between phenolic content as measured by UPLC-DAD and ORAC (R2 = 0.990). These findings show evidence for the first time of the diversity of phenolic acids in P. alliaceae and S. reticulata, and the presence of proanthocyanidins as minor components in latter species. Of particular relevance is the occurrence of proanthocyanidin oligomers in phenolic extracts from P. niruri and their potential bioactivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Natural Product Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Comparative Evaluation of Polyphenol Contents and Antioxidant Activities between Ethanol Extracts of Vitex negundo and Vitex trifolia L. Leaves by Different Methods
Plants 2017, 6(4), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants6040045 - 27 Sep 2017
Cited by 6
Abstract
The in vitro antioxidant potential assay between ethanolic extracts of two species from the genus Vitex (Vitex negundo L. and Vitex trifolia L.) belonging to the Lamiaceae family were evaluated. The antioxidant properties of different extracts prepared from both plant species were [...] Read more.
The in vitro antioxidant potential assay between ethanolic extracts of two species from the genus Vitex (Vitex negundo L. and Vitex trifolia L.) belonging to the Lamiaceae family were evaluated. The antioxidant properties of different extracts prepared from both plant species were evaluated by different methods. DPPH scavenging, nitric oxide scavenging, and β-carotene-linoleic acid and ferrous ion chelation methods were applied. The antioxidant activities of these two species were compared to standard antioxidants such as butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), ascorbic acid, and Ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA). Both species of Vitex showed significant antioxidant activity in all of the tested methods. As compared to V. trifolia L. (60.87–89.99%; 40.0–226.7 μg/mL), V. negundo has been found to hold higher antioxidant activity (62.6–94.22%; IC50 = 23.5–208.3 μg/mL) in all assays. In accordance with antioxidant activity, total polyphenol contents in V. negundo possessed greater phenolic (89.71 mg GAE/g dry weight of extract) and flavonoid content (63.11 mg QE/g dry weight of extract) as compared to that of V. trifolia (77.20 mg GAE/g and 57.41 mg QE/g dry weight of extract respectively). Our study revealed the significant correlation between the antioxidant activity and total phenolic and flavonoid contents of both plant species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Natural Product Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCommunication
Chemical Constituents and Antifungal Activity of Ficus hirta Vahl. Fruits
Plants 2017, 6(4), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants6040044 - 27 Sep 2017
Cited by 8
Abstract
Phytochemical investigation of Ficus hirta Vahl. (Moraceae) fruits led to isolate two carboline alkaloids (1 and 2), five sesquiterpenoids/norsesquiterpenoids (3–7), three flavonoids (8–10), and one phenylpropane-1,2-diol (11). Their structures were elucidated by the analysis of [...] Read more.
Phytochemical investigation of Ficus hirta Vahl. (Moraceae) fruits led to isolate two carboline alkaloids (1 and 2), five sesquiterpenoids/norsesquiterpenoids (3–7), three flavonoids (8–10), and one phenylpropane-1,2-diol (11). Their structures were elucidated by the analysis of their 1D and 2D NMR, and HR-ESI-MS data. All of the isolates were isolated from this species for the first time, while compounds 2, 4–6, and 8–11 were firstly reported from the genus Ficus. Antifungal assay revealed that compound 8 (namely pinocembrin-7-O-β-d-glucoside), a major flavonoid compound present in the ethanol extract of F. hirta fruits, showed good antifungal activity against Penicillium italicum, the phytopathogen of citrus blue mold caused the majority rotten of citrus fruits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Natural Product Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Harvesting on the Composition of Essential Oils from Five Varieties of Ocimum basilicum L. Cultivated in the Island of Kefalonia, Greece
Plants 2017, 6(3), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants6030041 - 18 Sep 2017
Cited by 5
Abstract
Five varieties of Ocimum basilicum L. namely lettuce, cinnamon, minimum, latifolia, and violetto were separately cultivated in field and greenhouse in the island Kefalonia (Greece). The effect of successive harvesting to the essential oil content was evaluated. In total 23 samples of essential [...] Read more.
Five varieties of Ocimum basilicum L. namely lettuce, cinnamon, minimum, latifolia, and violetto were separately cultivated in field and greenhouse in the island Kefalonia (Greece). The effect of successive harvesting to the essential oil content was evaluated. In total 23 samples of essential oils (EOs) were analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. Ninety-six constituents, which accounted for almost 99% of the oils, were identified. Cluster analysis was performed for all of the varieties in greenhouse and field conditions, in order to investigate the possible differentiation on the chemical composition of the essential oils, obtained between harvests during growing period. Each basil variety showed a unique chemical profile, but also the essential oil composition within each variety seems to be differentiated, affected by the harvests and the cultivation site. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Natural Product Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Antibacterial Properties of Flavonoids from Kino of the Eucalypt Tree, Corymbia torelliana
Plants 2017, 6(3), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants6030039 - 14 Sep 2017
Cited by 5
Abstract
Traditional medicine and ecological cues can both help to reveal bioactive natural compounds. Indigenous Australians have long used kino from trunks of the eucalypt tree, Corymbia citriodora, in traditional medicine. A closely related eucalypt, C. torelliana, produces a fruit resin with [...] Read more.
Traditional medicine and ecological cues can both help to reveal bioactive natural compounds. Indigenous Australians have long used kino from trunks of the eucalypt tree, Corymbia citriodora, in traditional medicine. A closely related eucalypt, C. torelliana, produces a fruit resin with antimicrobial properties that is highly attractive to stingless bees. We tested the antimicrobial activity of extracts from kino of C. citriodora, C. torelliana × C. citriodora, and C. torelliana against three Gram-negative and two Gram-positive bacteria and the unicellular fungus, Candida albicans. All extracts were active against all microbes, with the highest activity observed against P. aeruginosa. We tested the activity of seven flavonoids from the kino of C. torelliana against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. All flavonoids were active against P. aeruginosa, and one compound, (+)-(2S)-4′,5,7-trihydroxy-6-methylflavanone, was active against S. aureus. Another compound, 4′,5,7-trihydroxy-6,8-dimethylflavanone, greatly increased biofilm formation by both P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. The presence or absence of methyl groups at positions 6 and 8 in the flavonoid A ring determined their anti-Staphylococcus and biofilm-stimulating activity. One of the most abundant and active compounds, 3,4′,5,7-tetrahydroxyflavanone, was tested further against P. aeruginosa and was found to be bacteriostatic at its minimum inhibitory concentration of 200 µg/mL. This flavanonol reduced adhesion of P. aeruginosa cells while inducing no cytotoxic effects in Vero cells. This study demonstrated the antimicrobial properties of flavonoids in eucalypt kino and highlighted that traditional medicinal knowledge and ecological cues can reveal valuable natural compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Natural Product Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperCommunication
Variability of Secondary Metabolites of the Species Cichorium intybus L. from Different Habitats
Plants 2017, 6(3), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants6030038 - 11 Sep 2017
Cited by 5
Abstract
The principal aim of this paper is to show the influence of soil characteristics on the quantitative variability of secondary metabolites. Analysis of phenolic content, flavonoid concentrations, and the antioxidant activity was performed using the ethanol and ethyl acetate plant extracts of the [...] Read more.
The principal aim of this paper is to show the influence of soil characteristics on the quantitative variability of secondary metabolites. Analysis of phenolic content, flavonoid concentrations, and the antioxidant activity was performed using the ethanol and ethyl acetate plant extracts of the species Cichorium intybus L. (Asteraceae). The samples were collected from one saline habitat and two non-saline habitats. The values of phenolic content from the samples taken from the saline habitat ranged from 119.83 to 120.83 mg GA/g and from non-saline habitats from 92.44 to 115.10 mg GA/g. The amount of flavonoids in the samples from the saline locality varied between 144.36 and 317.62 mg Ru/g and from non-saline localities between 86.03 and 273.07 mg Ru/g. The IC50 values of antioxidant activity in the samples from the saline habitat ranged from 87.64 to 117.73 μg/mL and from 101.44 to 125.76 μg/mL in the samples from non-saline habitats. The results confirmed that soil types represent a significant influence on the quantitative content of secondary metabolites. The greatest concentrations of phenols and flavonoids and the highest level of antioxidant activity were found in the samples from saline soil. This further corroborates the importance of saline soil as an ecological factor, as it is proven to give rise to increased biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and related antioxidant activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Natural Product Research)
Open AccessCommunication
First Report on the Ethnopharmacological Uses of Medicinal Plants by Monpa Tribe from the Zemithang Region of Arunachal Pradesh, Eastern Himalayas, India
Plants 2017, 6(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants6010013 - 02 Mar 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
The Himalayas are well known for high diversity and ethnobotanical uses of the region’s medicinal plants. However, not all areas of the Himalayan regions are well studied. Studies on ethnobotanical uses of plants from the Eastern Himalayas are still lacking for many tribes. [...] Read more.
The Himalayas are well known for high diversity and ethnobotanical uses of the region’s medicinal plants. However, not all areas of the Himalayan regions are well studied. Studies on ethnobotanical uses of plants from the Eastern Himalayas are still lacking for many tribes. Past studies have primarily focused on listing plants’ vernacular names and their traditional medicinal uses. However, studies on traditional ethnopharmacological practices on medicine preparation by mixing multiple plant products of different species has not yet been reported in published literature from the state of Arunachal Pradesh, India, Eastern Himalayas. In this study, we are reporting for the first time the ethnopharmacological uses of 24 medicines and their procedures of preparation, as well as listing 53 plant species used for these medicines by the Monpa tribe. Such documentations are done first time in Arunachal Pradesh region of India as per our knowledge. Our research emphasizes the urgent need to document traditional medicine preparation procedures from local healers before traditional knowledge of tribal people living in remote locations are forgotten in a rapidly transforming country like India. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Natural Product Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCommunication
Caffeoylquinic Acids from the Aerial Parts of Chrysanthemum coronarium L.
Plants 2017, 6(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants6010010 - 17 Feb 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
To elucidate the chemical compositions of the aerial parts of Chrysanthemum coronarium L., the ethanol extracts of Ch. coronarium L. were firstly isolated by the MCI-gel resin column. The caffeoylquinic acid-rich fractions were further purified by various chromatographic columns including silica gel, Sephadex [...] Read more.
To elucidate the chemical compositions of the aerial parts of Chrysanthemum coronarium L., the ethanol extracts of Ch. coronarium L. were firstly isolated by the MCI-gel resin column. The caffeoylquinic acid-rich fractions were further purified by various chromatographic columns including silica gel, Sephadex LH-20, and semi-preparative HPLC to yield the compounds. The purified compounds were characterized by 1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR), 13C-NMR, and high resolution electrospray ionisation mass spectral (HR-ESI-MS) spectroscopy. Seven caffeoylquinic acid (CQA) compounds were isolated from this plant. Their structures were clarified by spectrometric methods and identified as 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid (1), 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (2), 4-O-caffeoylquinic acid (3), 3,4-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (4), 1,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (5), 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (6), and 4,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (7). Caffeoylquinic acids were the major constituents present in the aerial parts of Ch. coronarium L. All of the isolates except for compounds 2 and 6 were reported for the first time from this species. Moreover, compounds 35, and 7 were identified from the Chrysanthemum genus for the first time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Natural Product Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
A Comprehensive Review on the Medicinal Plants from the Genus Asphodelus
Plants 2018, 7(1), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants7010020 - 13 Mar 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
Plant-based systems continue to play an essential role in healthcare, and their use by different cultures has been extensively documented. Asphodelus L. (Asphodelaceae) is a genus of 18 species and of a total of 27 species, sub-species and varieties, distributed along [...] Read more.
Plant-based systems continue to play an essential role in healthcare, and their use by different cultures has been extensively documented. Asphodelus L. (Asphodelaceae) is a genus of 18 species and of a total of 27 species, sub-species and varieties, distributed along the Mediterranean basin, and has been traditionally used for treating several diseases particularly associated with inflammatory and infectious skin disorders. The present study aimed to provide a general review of the available literature on ethnomedical, phytochemical, and biological data related to the genus Asphodelus as a potential source of new compounds with biological activity. Considering phytochemical studies, 1,8-dihydroxyanthracene derivatives, flavonoids, phenolic acids and triterpenoids were the main classes of compounds identified in roots, leaf and seeds which were correlated with their biological activities as anti-microbial, anti-fungal, anti-parasitic, cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory or antioxidant agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Natural Product Research)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessReview
Phytochemicals: Extraction, Isolation, and Identification of Bioactive Compounds from Plant Extracts
Plants 2017, 6(4), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants6040042 - 22 Sep 2017
Cited by 52
Abstract
There are concerns about using synthetic phenolic antioxidants such as butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) as food additives because of the reported negative effects on human health. Thus, a replacement of these synthetics by antioxidant extractions from various foods has been [...] Read more.
There are concerns about using synthetic phenolic antioxidants such as butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) as food additives because of the reported negative effects on human health. Thus, a replacement of these synthetics by antioxidant extractions from various foods has been proposed. More than 8000 different phenolic compounds have been characterized; fruits and vegetables are the prime sources of natural antioxidants. In order to extract, measure, and identify bioactive compounds from a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, researchers use multiple techniques and methods. This review includes a brief description of a wide range of different assays. The antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer properties of phenolic natural products from fruits and vegetables are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Natural Product Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Antimicrobial Resistance and the Alternative Resources with Special Emphasis on Plant-Based Antimicrobials—A Review
Plants 2017, 6(2), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants6020016 - 10 Apr 2017
Cited by 38
Abstract
Indiscriminate and irrational use of antibiotics has created an unprecedented challenge for human civilization due to microbe’s development of antimicrobial resistance. It is difficult to treat bacterial infection due to bacteria’s ability to develop resistance against antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial agents are categorized according [...] Read more.
Indiscriminate and irrational use of antibiotics has created an unprecedented challenge for human civilization due to microbe’s development of antimicrobial resistance. It is difficult to treat bacterial infection due to bacteria’s ability to develop resistance against antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial agents are categorized according to their mechanism of action, i.e., interference with cell wall synthesis, DNA and RNA synthesis, lysis of the bacterial membrane, inhibition of protein synthesis, inhibition of metabolic pathways, etc. Bacteria may become resistant by antibiotic inactivation, target modification, efflux pump and plasmidic efflux. Currently, the clinically available treatment is not effective against the antibiotic resistance developed by some bacterial species. However, plant-based antimicrobials have immense potential to combat bacterial, fungal, protozoal and viral diseases without any known side effects. Such plant metabolites include quinines, alkaloids, lectins, polypeptides, flavones, flavonoids, flavonols, coumarin, terpenoids, essential oils and tannins. The present review focuses on antibiotic resistance, the resistance mechanism in bacteria against antibiotics and the role of plant-active secondary metabolites against microorganisms, which might be useful as an alternative and effective strategy to break the resistance among microbes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Natural Product Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Ethnopharmacology, Chemistry and Biological Properties of Four Malian Medicinal Plants
Plants 2017, 6(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants6010011 - 21 Feb 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
The ethnopharmacology, chemistry and pharmacology of four Malian medicinal plants, Biophytum umbraculum, Burkea africana, Lannea velutina and Terminalia macroptera are reviewed. These plants are used by traditional healers against numerous ailments: malaria, gastrointestinal diseases, wounds, sexually transmitted diseases, insect bites and [...] Read more.
The ethnopharmacology, chemistry and pharmacology of four Malian medicinal plants, Biophytum umbraculum, Burkea africana, Lannea velutina and Terminalia macroptera are reviewed. These plants are used by traditional healers against numerous ailments: malaria, gastrointestinal diseases, wounds, sexually transmitted diseases, insect bites and snake bites, etc. The scientific evidence for these uses is, however, limited. From the chemical and pharmacological evidence presented here, it seems possible that the use in traditional medicine of these plants may have a rational basis, although more clinical studies are needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicinal Plants and Natural Product Research)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop