Taxonomy and Plant Conservation, Volume II

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Systematics, Taxonomy, Nomenclature and Classification".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2023) | Viewed by 13575

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Section of Ecology and Systematics, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, 15784 Athens, Greece
Interests: plant biodiversity; phytogeography; plant conservation; biodiversity monitoring and assessment; vegetation ecology; protected areas; alien plants
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Co-Guest Editor
Department of Ecology and Systematics, Faculty of Biology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 15701 Athens, Greece
Interests: biogeography; biodiversity; extinction risk; island biodiversity; island biogeography; conservation biogeography; conservation biology; conservation ecology; plant diversity; species distribution modelling; plant systematics; climate change
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Co-Guest Editor
Laboratory of Botany, Department of Biology, University of Patras, GR-26504 Patras, Greece
Interests: mapping and assessment of ecosystems and ecosystem services; biodiversity and ecosystem services; inventory and mapping of flora and habitat types/vegetation types; monitoring and conservation status assessment of habitats and species; conservation management of species and habitat types; conservation policy and national biodiversity strategy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plant systematics is a fundamental field of biological sciences essential not only for scientists involved in various disciplines of botany but other areas as well. The recent emergence of new methods and techniques in taxonomy, phylogeny, and biogeography has led to important scientific discoveries and large-scale revisions of classical views. Additionally, numerous new plant species are discovered on an annual basis, proving that continuous and thorough scientific research has much more to offer in this area. Finally, scientific interest in conservation biology is increasing, as many plant species and their habitats are endangered, leading to population loss or even extinction, due to a multitude of threats, the most prominent of which is land use/land cover and climate change.

This Special Issue is open to articles on the taxonomy and phylogeny of vascular plants, phytogeography, and the impact of climate and land use/land cover change on plant distribution and conservation.

Dr. Ioannis Bazos
Dr. Kostas Kougioumoutzis
Prof. Dr. Panayotis Dimopoulos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • plant taxonomy
  • phytogeography
  • phylogeny
  • vascular plants
  • plant diversity
  • plant conservation
  • phylogeography
  • species distribution
  • conservation genetics
  • climate change
  • species distribution modelling
  • extinction risk

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 4006 KiB  
Article
First Report on the Genetic Diversity of Populations of Gossypium barbadense L. and Gossypium hirsutun L. in the Amazonian Native Communities, Cusco-Peru
by Luis Morales-Aranibar, Francisca Elena Yucra Yucra, Carlos Genaro Morales Aranibar, Manuel Canto Sáenz, Hebert Hernán Soto Gonzales, Jorge González Aguilera, Juan Luis Lazo Álvarez, Alan Mario Zuffo, Fabio Steiner, Rafael Felippe Ratke and Paulo Eduardo Teodoro
Plants 2023, 12(4), 865; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12040865 - 14 Feb 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2336
Abstract
The genus Gossypium has important ethnobotanical and economic value for Amazonian Native Communities (A.N.C.). However, little research has been undertaken on the distribution and genetic diversity of cotton populations maintained in the Peruvian rainforest. This work aims to present the first report on [...] Read more.
The genus Gossypium has important ethnobotanical and economic value for Amazonian Native Communities (A.N.C.). However, little research has been undertaken on the distribution and genetic diversity of cotton populations maintained in the Peruvian rainforest. This work aims to present the first report on the genetic diversity of Gossypium spp. populations in the A.N.C. of the province of La Convención, Cusco-Peru. The methodology was based on exploring, collecting, identifying, and characterizing the Gossypium populations present in the A.N.C. Twenty-six descriptors were evaluated (9 quantitative and 17 qualitative), and with this information, distribution, correlation, and principal component (PC) analyses were carried out. As a result, plants of two species [G. barbadense L. (44 samples) and G. hirsutum L. (19 samples)], one variety [G. barbadense var. brasiliensis (75 samples)], and three previously unidentified variations (9 samples) were identified. Altogether, 147 samples were collected. G. barbadense var. brasiliensis, which was always found in association with other economic crops within an altitude range of 338 to 1086 m, was the most predominant (51%), distributed in eleven A.N.C. and always in small plots (up to 2 ha). G. barbadense L. was cultivated between 397 and 1137 m of altitude in eight A.N.C. in plots of up to 3 ha in marginal lands. G. hirsutum L., with a smaller distribution (13%), was found between 334 and 497 m of altitude in only three communities; this species is cultivated in marginal areas throughout the year. The variability found for the first two PCs when considering the quantitative and qualitative descriptors was high (74.7%) and moderate (48.2%), respectively. When combining all the descriptors, the analysis showed that the first two PCs accounted for 51.8% of the total variability of the data. The PCs of the two types of data and their combination confirmed that the three populations found were grouped. The nine undefined samples were close to or intermediate between the described ones, showing that these samples may be the result of spontaneous crosses; as such, these samples need to be better evaluated with other tools for further definition. The information obtained shows that in the A.N.C. of Cusco-Peru, there is variability conserved by the inhabitants, who have been able to maintain and use these genotypes, even from their Amazonian indigenous ancestry, and the environment has been able to generate variability among the species, as will be highlighted in future works. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Taxonomy and Plant Conservation, Volume II)
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9 pages, 3894 KiB  
Communication
Taxonomy and Distribution of Spiraea hypericifolia in Italy and Typification of the Name S. flabellata (Rosaceae)
by Fabio Conti and Fabrizio Bartolucci
Plants 2023, 12(3), 536; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12030536 - 24 Jan 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1206
Abstract
Spiraea hypericifolia is a Eurasiatic species, distributed from SW Europe to C and SW Asia. In Italy, only the alien S. hypericifolia subsp. obovata was recorded, as naturalized in the Central Apennines. Spiraea flabellata was described from Abruzzo (Central Apennines, Italy) by Gussone [...] Read more.
Spiraea hypericifolia is a Eurasiatic species, distributed from SW Europe to C and SW Asia. In Italy, only the alien S. hypericifolia subsp. obovata was recorded, as naturalized in the Central Apennines. Spiraea flabellata was described from Abruzzo (Central Apennines, Italy) by Gussone in 1826 and is currently regarded as a synonym of S. hypericifolia subsp. obovata. Based on the study of living plants from locus classicus and the analysis of the original material traced in BOLO and NAP, S. flabellata should be referred instead to S. hypericifolia subsp. hypericifolia, a taxon reported here for the first time in Italy. The name S. flabellata is lectotypified with a specimen kept in NAP. Based on our study, S. hypericifolia subsp. obovata should be excluded from Italian flora. Spiraea hypericifolia subsp. hypericifolia should be considered native to Italy and added to the contingent of steppe plants of phytogeographic and conservation interest recorded in the Central Apennines. Finally, the conservation status assessment of S. hypericifolia subsp. hypericifolia according to IUCN categories and criteria, is proposed and discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Taxonomy and Plant Conservation, Volume II)
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24 pages, 3718 KiB  
Article
The Ovule Number Variation Provides New Insights into Taxa Delimitation in Willows (Salix subgen. Salix; Salicaceae)
by Alexander M. Marchenko and Yulia A. Kuzovkina
Plants 2023, 12(3), 497; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12030497 - 21 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1281
Abstract
Salix babylonica, S. alba and S. fragilis are closely related species characterized by the lanceolate, acuminate and serrulate leaves. The boundaries between them are defined by relatively few diagnostic characters, and their identification is not fully solved. Recent studies have demonstrated that [...] Read more.
Salix babylonica, S. alba and S. fragilis are closely related species characterized by the lanceolate, acuminate and serrulate leaves. The boundaries between them are defined by relatively few diagnostic characters, and their identification is not fully solved. Recent studies have demonstrated that the number of ovules present in the ovaries of the willow flower can assist in the identification of the species. The detailed ovule data, characteristic for flowers of each species, S. babylonica, S. alba and S. fragilis, and variation in the number of ovules per ovary were documented using many representatives of these species from various geographic regions. The data included the minimum and maximum number of ovules per valve and per ovary and the percentages of valves with a specific number of ovules in a catkin. Some intermediate genotypes and clusters with similar ovule indexes were observed. The important character for the identification of S. babylonica was the presence of valves with 1 or 2 ovules in the ovaries; S. fragilis had valves with 3 ovules while S. alba had the greater number (4–12). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Taxonomy and Plant Conservation, Volume II)
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22 pages, 7173 KiB  
Article
Tendril Anatomy: A Tool for Correct Identification among Cucurbitaceous Taxa
by Naveed Abbas, Muhammad Zafar, Mushtaq Ahmad, Ashwaq T. Althobaiti, Mohamed Fawzy Ramadan, Trobjon Makhkamov, Yusufjon Gafforov, Khislat Khaydarov, Muhammad Kabir, Shazia Sultana, Salman Majeed and Tajalla Batool
Plants 2022, 11(23), 3273; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11233273 - 28 Nov 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 1932
Abstract
This research examined the histological micro-structure of tendril vasculature in cucurbitaceous taxa. In this research, the tendril anatomy of 17 taxa of Cucurbitaceae categorized into seven genera, including Cucumis (five species), Cucurbita and Luffa (three species each), Citrullus and Momordica (two species each) [...] Read more.
This research examined the histological micro-structure of tendril vasculature in cucurbitaceous taxa. In this research, the tendril anatomy of 17 taxa of Cucurbitaceae categorized into seven genera, including Cucumis (five species), Cucurbita and Luffa (three species each), Citrullus and Momordica (two species each) while Lagenaria and Praecitrullus (one species each), collected from different areas of the Thal desert were examined via microscopic imaging to explore its taxonomic significance. Tendril transverse sections were cut with a Shandon Microtome to prepare slides. The distinctive characteristics of taxonomic value (qualitative and quantitative) include tendril and vascular bundle shape, variation in the number of vascular bundles, tendril diameter length, layers of sclerenchyma, and shape of collenchyma and epidermal cells. Tendril shapes observed are irregular, slightly oval-shaped, slightly C shaped, angular (4-angled, 6-angled, or polygonal), and star shaped. Quantitative measurements were taken to analyze the data statistically using SPSS software. Cucurbita pepo had a maximum tendril diameter length of 656.1 µm and a minimum in Momordica balsamina of 123.05 µm. The highest number of vascular bundles (12) were noticed in Luffa acutangula var.amara. Angular type was prominent in collenchyma, and irregular shape was dominant in sclerenchyma cells. A maximum of seven to nine sclerenchyma layers were present in Lagenaria siceraria and a minimum of two or three layers in Cucumis melo subsp. agrestis, Cucumis melo var. flexuosus, and Cucumis melo var.cantalupensis. Epidermis cells also show great variations with a rectangular shape being dominant. Statistical UPGMA dendrogram clustering of tendril vasculature traits shows that histological sections studied with microscopic techniques can be used to identify species and will play a vital role in future taxonomic and phylogenic linkages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Taxonomy and Plant Conservation, Volume II)
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22 pages, 5353 KiB  
Article
A Morphometric and Karyological Study of the Anthemis macedonica Group (Asteraceae, Anthemideae) Reveals a New Species from Greece
by Katerina Goula, Konstantinos Touloumis, Panayotis Dimopoulos and Theophanis Constantinidis
Plants 2022, 11(21), 3006; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11213006 - 7 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2003
Abstract
A recent study of the Anthemis collections in the Balkans indicated that the taxa of the Anthemis macedonica group (A. macedonica subsp. macedonica, A. macedonica subsp. thracica, A. meteorica, A. orbelica) exhibit noteworthy morphological patterns not evaluated before. [...] Read more.
A recent study of the Anthemis collections in the Balkans indicated that the taxa of the Anthemis macedonica group (A. macedonica subsp. macedonica, A. macedonica subsp. thracica, A. meteorica, A. orbelica) exhibit noteworthy morphological patterns not evaluated before. We applied morphometric approaches (principal components analysis, PCA; factor analysis on mixed data, FAMD) by considering 19 qualitative and 20 quantitative morphological characters, together with three ratios, in 26 populations of this group. Furthermore, the chromosome numbers and karyotype morphology were investigated in eight populations of the group, covering the taxa participating in the study. Our results revealed that the southernmost populations of the group represent a hitherto unknown species confined to serpentine: it is described here as Anthemis serpentinica Goula & Constantinidis. The morphological evidence supports the proximity of A. macedonica and A. orbelica, which would be better considered as subspecific entities of the same species. On the contrary, A. meteorica and A. thracica are retained as independent entities at species level. All taxa share the same diploid chromosome number of 2n = 2x = 18 with similar but not identical karyotypes. A brief description of all taxa, based on recent new collections, and a dichotomous key are presented. Lectotypes are designated for Anthemis macedonica and A. meteorica. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Taxonomy and Plant Conservation, Volume II)
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22 pages, 5420 KiB  
Article
Plant Diversity of Mts. Oligirtos and Farmakas (NE Peloponnisos, Greece) with Emphasis on Their Endemic Flora
by Andreas Zikos and Theophanis Constantinidis
Plants 2022, 11(19), 2649; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11192649 - 9 Oct 2022
Viewed by 1701
Abstract
Greece is known to be a biodiversity hotspot. Though the plant diversity of Peloponnisos, the southernmost part of the Greek mainland, has been well-studied during the past 200 years, there are still gaps in our knowledge. To this end, the flora of the [...] Read more.
Greece is known to be a biodiversity hotspot. Though the plant diversity of Peloponnisos, the southernmost part of the Greek mainland, has been well-studied during the past 200 years, there are still gaps in our knowledge. To this end, the flora of the neighboring mountains Oligirtos and Farmakas was investigated, with a total of 740 and 762 taxa (species and subspecies) recorded, respectively, of which 635 and 756 for the first time. Ten species or subspecies were previously not known from Peloponnisos. Endemics correspond to 10.2% and 8.9% of the total flora and are predominately hemicryptophytes and entomogamous. Almost half of them produce capsules. The number of endemics per 2 × 2 km grid cell reveals that their highest number is found in areas of high elevation, and corresponds to habitats above the tree line, or to the limestone cliffs vegetation. No less than 62 endemic plant taxa of Mt. Oligirtos and 58 of Mt. Farmakas are threatened. A comparison of Mts. Oligirtos and Farmakas with five neighboring mountains shows that elevation correlates positively with the number of regional or bi-regional endemics but not with local or narrow endemics. The importance of mountainous regions for plant conservation is stressed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Taxonomy and Plant Conservation, Volume II)
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11 pages, 6384 KiB  
Article
Over 30 Years of Misidentification: A New Nothospecies Lycoris × jinzheniae (Amaryllidaceae) in Eastern China, Based on Molecular, Morphological, and Karyotypic Evidence
by Si-Yu Zhang, Ying-Feng Hu, Hao-Tian Wang, Peng-Chong Zhang and Jian-Wen Shao
Plants 2022, 11(13), 1730; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11131730 - 29 Jun 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1946
Abstract
Based on the complete chloroplast genome, morphology, and karyotype evidence, we identified a new nothospecies, Lycoris × jinzheniae S.Y. Zhang, P.C. Zhang & J.W. Shao, in eastern China. This new nothospecies has been inappropriately named Lycoris × albiflora in the previous literature for [...] Read more.
Based on the complete chloroplast genome, morphology, and karyotype evidence, we identified a new nothospecies, Lycoris × jinzheniae S.Y. Zhang, P.C. Zhang & J.W. Shao, in eastern China. This new nothospecies has been inappropriately named Lycoris × albiflora in the previous literature for more than 30 years. However, the new nothospecies resulted from the hybridization of L. sprengeri and L. chinensis and had the following characteristics: the karyotype was 2n = 19 = 3V + 16I, the leaves emerged in the spring, the ratio of filament to corolla length was approximately 1.2, tepals were slightly undulated and curved, and it was distributed throughout eastern China. These characteristics are quite different from those of L. × albiflora; thus, in this study, we named it and provided a detailed morphological description and diagnosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Taxonomy and Plant Conservation, Volume II)
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