Special Issue "Advances in Plant Physiology and Ecophysiology"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Physiology and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 March 2022) | Viewed by 5775

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ramón Guevara González
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Queretaro, Mexico
Interests: plant physiology of stress; plant biochemistry; plant molecular biology; plant pathology and plant biotechnology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

The aim of the Special Issue on advances in Plant Physiology and Ecophysiology is to try to show the current vision regarding plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses as well as several aspects related to the possibility that these responses might be managed and applied during plant cultivation or conservation in order to provide alternatives for sustainable plant production. Research including either basic and/or applied knowledge using tools such as omic approaches, molecular biology, biochemistry, physiology, and so on, will be welcome. Moreover, the scope of the research displayed in this Special Issue might include issues related with genetic, epigenetic, molecular biology, biochemistry, agronanotechnology, physiology, ecology, and agricultural/horticultural approaches that help in the understanding of basic physiological aspects on plant stress response and suggest an impact in plant production and/or conservation.

Dr. Ramón Guevara González
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biotic and abiotic stresses
  • Physiology
  • stress management
  • Plant production
  • Plant conservation

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Article
Transcription Profile of Auxin Related Genes during Positively Gravitropic Hypocotyl Curvature of Brassica rapa
Plants 2022, 11(9), 1191; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11091191 - 28 Apr 2022
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Abstract
Unlike typical negative gravitropic curvature, young hypocotyls of Brassica rapa and other dicots exhibit positive gravitropism. This positive curvature occurs at the base of the hypocotyl and is followed by the typical negative gravity-induced curvature. We investigated the role of auxin in both [...] Read more.
Unlike typical negative gravitropic curvature, young hypocotyls of Brassica rapa and other dicots exhibit positive gravitropism. This positive curvature occurs at the base of the hypocotyl and is followed by the typical negative gravity-induced curvature. We investigated the role of auxin in both positive and negative hypocotyl curvature by examining the transcription of PIN1, PIN3, IAA5 and ARG1 in curving tissue. We compared tissue extraction of the convex and concave flank with Solid Phase Gene Extraction (SPGE). Based on Ubiquitin1 (UBQ1) as a reference gene, the log (2) fold change of all examined genes was determined. Transcription of the examined genes varied during the graviresponse suggesting that these genes affect differential elongation. The transcription of all genes was upregulated in the lower flank and downregulated in the upper flank during the initial downward curving period. After 48 h, the transcription profile reversed, suggesting that the ensuing negative gravicurvature is controlled by the same genes as the positive gravicurvature. High-spatial resolution profiling using SPGE revealed that the transcription profile of the examined genes was spatially distinct within the curving tissue. The comparison of the hypocotyl transcription profile with the root tip indicated that the tip tissue is a suitable reference for curving hypocotyls and that root and hypocotyl curvature are controlled by the same physiological processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Plant Physiology and Ecophysiology)
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Article
Comparison of Maize Genotypes Using Drought-Tolerance Indices and Graphical Analysis under Normal and Humidity Stress Conditions
Plants 2022, 11(7), 942; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11070942 - 30 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 517
Abstract
This study aimed to identify drought-tolerant genotypes and to evaluate and compare the response of genotypes under normal conditions and humidity stress. The experiment was conducted in a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) on 12 commercial single cross hybrids of maize (Zea [...] Read more.
This study aimed to identify drought-tolerant genotypes and to evaluate and compare the response of genotypes under normal conditions and humidity stress. The experiment was conducted in a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) on 12 commercial single cross hybrids of maize (Zea mays L.) with three replications in two separate experiments under normal and stress conditions. GT biplot was used to compare genotypes under normal conditions and humidity stress. Based on the polygon diagrams’ graphical analysis, KSC206, KSC704, KSC705 and KSC706 genotypes were identified as desirable hybrids. The ranking diagram of genotypes based on ideal genotype also showed that the KSC704 genotype had high desirability in all evaluated traits in normal and stress conditions. TOL, MP, HARM, GMP, SSI and STI indices were used to identify drought-tolerant genotypes, and the genotypes were ranked based on this index. Based on this, KSC260, SC302 and KSC400 hybrids were selected as resistant hybrids. Based on the correlation analysis between drought-tolerance indices, a positive correlation was observed between MP, GMP, HARM and STI indices. Based on the analysis of the PCA on the indices, the first and second principal components were given the titles of grain yield tolerance component under humidity stress conditions and grain yield stability component under normal humidity conditions, respectively. KSC704 was superior to other hybrids in terms of grain yield under normal conditions and stress, and the KSC260 hybrid was identified as a tolerant hybrid in terms of all studied traits under drought stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Plant Physiology and Ecophysiology)
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Article
Responses of Ecological Stoichiometric Characteristics of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Phosphorus to Periodic Submergence in Mega-Reservoir: Growth of Taxodium distichum and Taxodium ascendens
Plants 2021, 10(10), 2040; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10102040 - 28 Sep 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 678
Abstract
Ecological stoichiometric studies can be useful for managing the deteriorated riparian zones of mega-reservoirs in which nutrients significantly impact the balanced vegetation cover. The present study aims to explore the effects of periodic submergence on the stoichiometric ecological characteristics of carbon (C), nitrogen [...] Read more.
Ecological stoichiometric studies can be useful for managing the deteriorated riparian zones of mega-reservoirs in which nutrients significantly impact the balanced vegetation cover. The present study aims to explore the effects of periodic submergence on the stoichiometric ecological characteristics of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P), as well as the growth conditions of two leading conifer species (Taxodium distichum and Taxodium ascendens) in the hydro-fluctuation zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) region, China. The stoichiometrical contents of C, N, and P in fine roots, leaves, and branches, and the growth conditions of T. distichum and T. ascendens were measured in July 2019. The results showed that periodic submergence affected the stoichiometric characteristics and growth conditions of these two woody species, and the impact was restrained, but both grew well. The effects of inundation on the C, N, and P ecological stoichiometric characteristics differed in different parts of trees. In general, the C contents showed the following pattern: leaves > branches > fine roots. The N and P content showed the following pattern: leaves > fine roots > branches, while the C/N and C/P ratios showed an opposite trend to that of N and P. The N and P content in all parts of T. distichum (with means of 17.18 and 1.70 g/kg for leaves, 4.80 and 0.57 g/kg for branches, and 6.88 and 1.10 g/kg for fine roots, respectively) and T. ascendens (with means of 14.56 and 1.87 g/kg for leaves, 5.03 and 0.63 g/kg for branches, and 8.17 and 1.66 g/kg for fine roots, respectively) were higher than the national average level (with means of 14.14 and 1.11 g/kg for leaves, 3.04 and 0.31 g/kg for branches, and 4.85 and 0.47 g/kg for fine roots, respectively). Except for N and P contents in the leaves of T. distichum, there was a significant correlation between N and P elements in other parts (p < 0.05). Nevertheless, the N/P ratio (10.15, 8.52, 6.44, and 7.93, 8.12, 5.20 in leaves, branches, and fine roots of T. distichum and T. ascendens, respectively) was lower than the critical ratio of 14. The growth conditions of T. distichum and T. ascendens were significantly negatively correlated with their leaf C contents and significantly positively correlated with their fine root N and P contents. This study showed that T. distichum and T. ascendens could maintain their normal growth needs by properly allocating nutrients between different organs to adapt to the long periodic submergence in the hydro-fluctuation zone of the TGR region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Plant Physiology and Ecophysiology)
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Article
Effect of Salicylic Acid in the Yield of Ricinine in Ricinus communis under Greenhouse Condition
Plants 2021, 10(9), 1902; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10091902 - 14 Sep 2021
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Abstract
Castor bean (Ricinus communis) seeds contain ricinine, an alkaloid with insecticidal and insectistatic activities. Elicitation with salicylic acid (SA) has proven to stress R. communis and might modify the ricinine concentration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concentration [...] Read more.
Castor bean (Ricinus communis) seeds contain ricinine, an alkaloid with insecticidal and insectistatic activities. Elicitation with salicylic acid (SA) has proven to stress R. communis and might modify the ricinine concentration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concentration of ricinine in the bagasse of seeds from R. communis elicited with exogenous SA under greenhouse conditions. Plants were grown and divided into five groups, which were sprayed with SA and drench with 50 mL 60 days after sowing with concentrations of SA (0, 100, 300, 600 and 900 µM). Clusters were mixed and separated according to the treatment, and dried. The seeds were ground, the oil was extracted by Soxhlet with hexane, and then the bagasse was extracted with methanol. Ricinine was determined by HPLC. Elicitation did not change the plant height or diameter; the control group had 9.17 µg mL−1 of ricinine; and the concentrations followed a hormesis curve with the peak at 300 µM of SA that had a ricinine concentration of 18.25 µg mL−1. Elicitation with SA might be a cost-effective technique to increase ricinine from R. communis bagasse. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Plant Physiology and Ecophysiology)
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Article
Responses of Purple Rice Genotypes to Nitrogen and Zinc Fertilizer Application on Grain Yield, Nitrogen, Zinc, and Anthocyanin Concentration
Plants 2021, 10(8), 1717; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10081717 - 20 Aug 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1130
Abstract
Purple rice is recognized as a staple food for humans and as a source of anthocyanins and micronutrients such as zinc (Zn). This study examined how nitrogen (N) and Zn fertilizers affected grain yield and grain N, Zn, and anthocyanin concentration among purple [...] Read more.
Purple rice is recognized as a staple food for humans and as a source of anthocyanins and micronutrients such as zinc (Zn). This study examined how nitrogen (N) and Zn fertilizers affected grain yield and grain N, Zn, and anthocyanin concentration among purple rice genotypes. Six purple rice genotypes (PIZ, KAK, KS, KH-CMU, KDK, and HN) were grown under two levels of N, the optimum N60 (60 kg/ha) and high N180 (180 kg/ha) rates, along with three Zn application methods (no Zn application (Zn0), soil Zn application (ZnS; 50 kg ZnSO4/ha), and foliar Zn spray (ZnF; 0.5% ZnSO4 at the rate of 900 L/ha three times at heading, flowering, and early milk stages). Grain yield of the five purple rice landraces increased by 21–40% when increasing N from N60 to N180, although no response was found with HN. The higher N rate increased grain N concentration by 10–50% among the genotypes, while anthocyanin concentration increased by 100–110% in KAK and KS, and grain Zn was increased in KS. Applying ZnS increased grain yield by 16–94% but decreased anthocyanin and N concentrations compared to the control Zn0. Applying ZnF effectively increased grain Zn concentration by 40–140% in the genotypes without adversely impacting grain anthocyanin or N concentration. This study demonstrated that the appropriate management of N and Zn fertilizers for specific purple rice genotypes would be one way to increase productivity and grain N, Zn, and anthocyanin concentration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Plant Physiology and Ecophysiology)
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Review

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Review
Specific Roles of Lipoxygenases in Development and Responses to Stress in Plants
Plants 2022, 11(7), 979; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11070979 - 04 Apr 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 799
Abstract
Lipoxygenases (LOXs), naturally occurring enzymes, are widely distributed in plants and animals. LOXs can be non-sulfur iron, non-heme iron, or manganese-containing dioxygenase redox enzymes. LOXs catalyze the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids into fatty acid hydroperoxides. Linolenic acid, a precursor in the jasmonic [...] Read more.
Lipoxygenases (LOXs), naturally occurring enzymes, are widely distributed in plants and animals. LOXs can be non-sulfur iron, non-heme iron, or manganese-containing dioxygenase redox enzymes. LOXs catalyze the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids into fatty acid hydroperoxides. Linolenic acid, a precursor in the jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis, is converted to 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid through oxygenation with LOX, allene oxide synthase, and allene oxide cyclase. Moreover, JA participates in seed germination, fruit ripening, senescence, and many other physio-biochemical processes. LOXs also play crucial roles in defense responses against biotic stress, i.e., insects, pests, pathogenic attacks, and abiotic stress, such as wounding, UV-rays, extreme temperature, oxidative stress, and drought. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Plant Physiology and Ecophysiology)
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