Special Issue "Rare and Imported Paediatric Infections"

A special issue of Pharmacy (ISSN 2226-4787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2019)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Godwin Oligbu

Paediatric Infectious Diseases Research Group, St Georges University of London, UK
E-Mail
Interests: infectious diseases; vaccine preventable diseases; paediatric allergy; public health; paediatrics and medical education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Changes in infectious disease transmission patterns are unprecedented in this current climate. There is a need for a better understanding of the causal relationships, in order to predict the future impacts of this on children’s health. In addition, health care workers are likely to see an increasingly number of cases due to human and environmental displacement. An international collaborative effort with an early and integrated model of care is required to resolve this. Meanwhile, there is urgent requirement for a study on the trend and pattern of these rare paediatric infectious diseases in our population. This study will undoubtedly elucidate the modes of indigenous transmission, treatment and preventive measures

In this Special Issue of Pharmacy, we are seeking, in particular, case reports, case series, and reviews that describe rare paediatric infectious diseases, vaccine preventable diseases and pharmocotherapy. Authors are also invited to submit articles or original research that might relate to imported infections, which may be endemic in other countries but rare in the region of study.

The principle aim of this Special Issue is to share good practices amongst health care providers, especially in relation to uncommon and rare infections in children and provide evidence-based practice for learning and educational development of health professionals.

Dr. Godwin Oligbu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmacy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Infections
  • Paediatrics
  • Vaccines
  • Public health
  • Imported infections
  • Pharmacotherapy

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Rare and Imported Infections: Are We Prepared?
Received: 6 January 2019 / Revised: 10 January 2019 / Accepted: 10 January 2019 / Published: 13 January 2019
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Abstract
The world’s population is rapidly expanding [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rare and Imported Paediatric Infections)

Review

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Open AccessReview
Risk of Transverse Myelitis Following Dengue Infection: A Systematic Review of the Literature
Received: 17 November 2018 / Revised: 10 December 2018 / Accepted: 19 December 2018 / Published: 23 December 2018
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Abstract
Introduction: Dengue virus (DENV) is one of the most common arbovirus diseases, with a wide spectrum of presentation. Spinal cord involvement in dengue infection (DF) is rare. However, the risk of transverse myelitis (TM) following Dengue has not been systematically assessed. Methods [...] Read more.
Introduction: Dengue virus (DENV) is one of the most common arbovirus diseases, with a wide spectrum of presentation. Spinal cord involvement in dengue infection (DF) is rare. However, the risk of transverse myelitis (TM) following Dengue has not been systematically assessed. Methods: We undertook a systematic review of published English literature from January 1974 to December 2017 to assess risk of TM and outcomes following DF. Data sources included EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane library, ISI web of knowledge, conference proceedings and references within identified articles. Results: We identified 242 potential studies, 62 were duplicates. A further 136 were excluded on the basis of title and abstract and 19 studies did not meet the eligibility criteria on full text screening. We included 25 publications involving 2672 cases of DF. A small proportion (10.8%, (289/2672)) had neurological complications, of which 2.3% (61/2672) was TM. For articles reporting epidemiological data, the neurological complication was twice in males compared to female 67.7% (130/192) vs. 32.7% (62/192) and 1.5-fold increase TM for males 59.3% (32/54) vs 40.7% (22/54). The mean age at presentation was 33.1years (range 0.75–61), with onset at 11.7days. The method of diagnosing TM due to DF was mainly IgM seropositivity 92% (n = 23/25) and the commonest treatment modality was steroid 78.3% (n = 18/23). Only half had full recovery 50.8% (n = 31/61). There was no mortality following dengue, however, the crude case fatality rate following TM was 3.3% (n = 2/61). Conclusion: This review highlights the risk of TM following dengue. Although neurological complications are rare, especially TM, once set in, it is associated with a significant morbidity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rare and Imported Paediatric Infections)
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Other

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Open AccessCase Report
Teicoplanin-Induced Anaphylactic Reaction in Children: A Case Report
Pharmacy 2018, 6(4), 110; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy6040110
Received: 24 August 2018 / Revised: 19 September 2018 / Accepted: 30 September 2018 / Published: 9 October 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (156 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Teicoplanin is now increasingly used as a first-line prophylactic therapy for major surgical procedures, treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections and for those with reported penicillin allergy. Teicoplanin is rarely associated with anaphylaxis and there is limited information on the prevalence of teicoplanin-induced [...] Read more.
Teicoplanin is now increasingly used as a first-line prophylactic therapy for major surgical procedures, treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections and for those with reported penicillin allergy. Teicoplanin is rarely associated with anaphylaxis and there is limited information on the prevalence of teicoplanin-induced perioperative anaphylaxis. Here, we describe a case of a 12-year-old child with teicoplanin-induced anaphylaxis peri-operatively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rare and Imported Paediatric Infections)
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