Special Issue "Pharmacist Services in Community Pharmacies"

A special issue of Pharmacy (ISSN 2226-4787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ally Dering Anderson

Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy Practice & Science, College of Pharmacy, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198, USA
Interests: excellence in education; community pharmacy; pharmacy law and ethics; permission-less practice; point of care testing; collaborative practice

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pharmacists provide value to the health care system every day, in many settings. The ability to conduct research in the community pharmacy setting is often limited by institutional review boards, by professional time, and by the lack of academic researchers located in community pharmacies. Even with these challenges, important community-based research is being done every day. It is time for pharmacists to move beyond justifying their existence in the health care team, to demonstrating and publishing on their value to the health care system. This value can be expressed through decreased hospital admissions, cost-savings, patient satisfaction, and through improved outcomes. Value may also be expressed in new legislation or new regulations intended to remove barriers to the advanced practices being taught in colleges and schools of pharmacy across the United States and around the world.

Share your findings in this Special Issue of Pharmacy and help to create a resource for all those who advocate for community pharmacists and the services we provide.

Dr. Ally Dering Anderson
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmacy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Pharmacist Services
  • Community Pharmacy
  • Collaborative Practice
  • Point of Care Testing
  • Disease State Management
  • Medication Therapy Management
  • Vaccinations

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Training and Toolkit Resources to Support Implementation of a Community Pharmacy Fall Prevention Service
Pharmacy 2019, 7(3), 113; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy7030113 - 09 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Community pharmacies are an ideal setting to manage high-risk medications and screen older adults at risk for falls. Appropriate training and resources are needed to successfully implement services in this setting. The purpose of this paper is to identify the key training, tools, [...] Read more.
Community pharmacies are an ideal setting to manage high-risk medications and screen older adults at risk for falls. Appropriate training and resources are needed to successfully implement services in this setting. The purpose of this paper is to identify the key training, tools, and resources to support implementation of fall prevention services. The service was implemented in a network of community pharmacies located in North Carolina. Pharmacies were provided with onboard and longitudinal training, and a project coach. A toolkit contained resources to collect medication information, identify high-risk medications, develop and share recommendations with prescribers, market the service, and educate patients. Project champions at each pharmacy received a nine-question, web-based survey (Qualtrics) to identify usefulness of the training and resources. The quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Thirty-one community pharmacies implemented the service. Twenty-three project champions (74%) completed the post-intervention survey. Comprehensive onboard training was rated as more useful than longitudinal training. Resources to identify high-risk medications, develop recommendations, and share recommendations with prescribers were considered most useful. By providing appropriate training and resources to support fall prevention services, community pharmacists can improve patient care as part of their routine workflow. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pharmacist Services in Community Pharmacies)
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Open AccessArticle
Pilot and Feasibility of Combining a Medication Adherence Intervention and Group Diabetes Education for Patients with Type-2 Diabetes
Pharmacy 2019, 7(3), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy7030076 - 28 Jun 2019
Abstract
Introduction: Controlling diabetes typically requires self-management and medications. Community pharmacists are positioned to support patients with both. Methods: This study assessed the feasibility and potential benefit of combining pharmacist-provided group diabetes education (up to eight sessions) and medication synchronization using a [...] Read more.
Introduction: Controlling diabetes typically requires self-management and medications. Community pharmacists are positioned to support patients with both. Methods: This study assessed the feasibility and potential benefit of combining pharmacist-provided group diabetes education (up to eight sessions) and medication synchronization using a three-group design. Data were collected using pre–post paper surveys and electronic health record data. One group received both education and synchronization services, another group received medication synchronization only, and a third served as control. Results: Of 300 contacted patients, eighteen patients participated in group diabetes education, 14 had medication synchronization only, and 12 comprised a control group. There was little change in HbA1c over the study period. Medication adherence appeared to be positively aided by medication synchronization, although all groups started with high adherence. Some medication beliefs and self-care activities may have been positively impacted by group diabetes education. Both groups receiving medication synchronization were satisfied. Conclusions: Participants strongly agreed they would recommend group diabetes education from the study pharmacy to a friend and were satisfied with medication synchronization; however, it was difficult to tell if there was a synergistic effect by combining the two services. Reimbursement for diabetes education was not obtained despite multiple attempts, hindering sustainability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pharmacist Services in Community Pharmacies)
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