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Nutrition in the Liver Damage

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2024 | Viewed by 5272

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Biochemistry and Experimental Medicine, The Children’s Memorial Health Institute, 04-761 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: metabolic syndrome; metabolomics; obesity; chronic liver disease; lipoproteins; vitamins; antioxidants; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; fatty acids; nutrition; inflammation
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Co-Guest Editor
Department of Food Technology and Nutrition, Wroclaw University of Economics and Business, 53-345 Wroclaw, Poland
Interests: disease prevention; metabolism; nutritional epidemiology; lipoproteins; vitamins; human nutrition; nutritional education; anthropometrics; body composition analysis; high density lipoproteins

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutrition in the case of liver damage supports clinical therapy. We see different extremes in patients with liver disease, from undernutrition to overweight and obesity. The topic of nutrition in liver diseases depends on the stage of the disease and the patient's nutritional status. The slow, irreversible and progressive deterioration of liver function leads to malnutrition. However, in liver diseases related to overweight and obesity, we observe disorders of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and disorders of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism.

Nutritional deficiencies, including those related to vitamins A, D, E, K, B12, recurrent vomiting and appetite disorders are tasks for a qualified dietitian. Therefore, the aim of this Special Issue is to discuss various solutions and assistance procedures for patients with liver diseases.

Dr. Aldona Wierzbicka-Rucinska
Dr. Zuzanna Goluch
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • liver damage
  • insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I)
  • carbohydrate metabolism (glucose, insulin)
  • diet
  • vitamins
  • lipids
  • physical activity

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 640 KiB  
Article
Effects of Bioactive Dietary Components on Changes in Lipid and Liver Parameters in Women after Bariatric Surgery and Procedures
by Edyta Barbara Balejko, Anna Bogacka, Jarosław Lichota and Jan Pawlus
Nutrients 2024, 16(9), 1379; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16091379 - 1 May 2024
Viewed by 692
Abstract
Excess adipose tissue, as well as its distribution, correlates strongly with disorders of lipid and liver parameters and chronic inflammation. The pathophysiology of metabolic diseases caused by obesity is associated with the dysfunction of visceral adipose tissue. Effective and alternative interventions such as [...] Read more.
Excess adipose tissue, as well as its distribution, correlates strongly with disorders of lipid and liver parameters and chronic inflammation. The pathophysiology of metabolic diseases caused by obesity is associated with the dysfunction of visceral adipose tissue. Effective and alternative interventions such as the Bioenteric Intragastric Balloon and bariatric surgeries such as the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of modifying the recommended standard weight loss diet after bariatric surgery and procedures on reducing chronic inflammation in overweight patients. In the study, bioactive anti-inflammatory dietary components were used supportively. Changes in the concentrations of lipid parameters, liver parameters, antioxidant enzymes, cytokines, and chemokines were demonstrated. The enrichment of the diet, after bariatric surgery, with the addition of n-3 EFAs(Essential Fatty Acids), bioflavonoids, vitamins, and synbiotics resulted in higher weight losses in the patients in the study with a simultaneous reduction in parameters indicating liver dysfunction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition in the Liver Damage)
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15 pages, 3351 KiB  
Article
The Role of Acyl-CoA Synthetase 1 in Bioactive Lipid Accumulation and the Development of Hepatic Insulin Resistance
by Piotr Zabielski, Monika Imierska, Kamila Roszczyc-Owsiejczuk, Mariusz Kuźmicki, Paweł Rogalski, Jarosław Daniluk and Agnieszka U. Błachnio-Zabielska
Nutrients 2024, 16(7), 1003; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16071003 - 29 Mar 2024
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Abstract
The liver plays a crucial role in glucose metabolism. Obesity and a diet rich in fats (HFD) contribute to the accumulation of intracellular lipids. The aim of the study was to explore the involvement of acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) in bioactive lipid accumulation [...] Read more.
The liver plays a crucial role in glucose metabolism. Obesity and a diet rich in fats (HFD) contribute to the accumulation of intracellular lipids. The aim of the study was to explore the involvement of acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) in bioactive lipid accumulation and the induction of liver insulin resistance (InsR) in animals fed an HFD. The experiments were performed on male C57BL/6 mice divided into the following experimental groups: 1. Animals fed a control diet; 2. animals fed HFD; and 3. HFD-fed animals with the hepatic ACSL1 gene silenced through a hydrodynamic gene delivery technique. Long-chain acyl-CoAs, sphingolipids, and diacylglycerols were measured by LC/MS/MS. Glycogen was measured by means of a commercially available kit. The protein expression and phosphorylation state of the insulin pathway was estimated by Western blot. HFD-fed mice developed InsR, manifested as an increase in fasting blood glucose levels (202.5 mg/dL vs. 130.5 mg/dL in the control group) and inhibition of the insulin pathway, which resulted in an increase in the rate of gluconeogenesis (0.420 vs. 0.208 in the control group) and a decrease in the hepatic glycogen content (1.17 μg/mg vs. 2.32 μg/mg in the control group). Hepatic ACSL1 silencing resulted in decreased lipid content and improved insulin sensitivity, accounting for the decreased rate of gluconeogenesis (0.348 vs. 0.420 in HFD(+/+)) and the increased glycogen content (4.3 μg/mg vs. 1.17 μg/mg in HFD(+/+)). The elevation of gluconeogenesis and the decrease in glycogenesis in the hepatic tissue of HFD-fed mice resulted from cellular lipid accumulation. Inhibition of lipid synthesis through silencing ACSL1 alleviated HFD-induced hepatic InsR. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition in the Liver Damage)
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12 pages, 590 KiB  
Article
Effects of Egg Consumption on Subjects with SLD or Hypertension: A MICOL Study
by Rossella Tatoli, Caterina Bonfiglio, Francesco Cuccaro, Angelo Campanella, Sergio Coletta, Pasqua Letizia Pesole, Gianluigi Giannelli and Rossella Donghia
Nutrients 2024, 16(3), 430; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16030430 - 31 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Background: Steatotic liver disease (SLD) is defined as a fat accumulation in more than 5% of hepatocytes; it can progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), associated with an increased state of inflammation. The aim of this study was to explore the protective effects of [...] Read more.
Background: Steatotic liver disease (SLD) is defined as a fat accumulation in more than 5% of hepatocytes; it can progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), associated with an increased state of inflammation. The aim of this study was to explore the protective effects of eating eggs and any association with SLD and hypertension (HTN). Methods: The study cohort included 908 participants assessed in the fourth recall of the MICOL study, grouped into four groups, based on NALFD and/or HTN. Results: The prevalence of HTN and SLD among participants was 31.61%. Overall, the results indicated a statistical significance of egg consumption, showing a protective role against the two disease conditions, in both the raw and adjusted models (RRR = 0.34, p = 0.009, 0.15 to 0.76 95% C.I.). Conclusions: Many differences were found among the groups, and the protective role of eating eggs was amply demonstrated. We can conclude that it is unwise to demonize the intake of this food and its nutritional properties, in contrast with previous reports in the literature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition in the Liver Damage)
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