Special Issue "Nutrition, Choice and Health-Related Claims"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Tiziana de-Magistris Website E-Mail
Economía Agroalimentaria y de los Recursos Naturales Agrifood Economics and Natural Resources Unit
Interests: sustainable and health labeling, consumer behaviour, food marketing, food choice and decision-making, experimental methods, visual attention and virtual reality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The appearance and development of chronic diseases also known as non-communicable diseases (NCDs) has become one of the most common causes of deaths not only in the developed countries but also in the developing ones. Scientific evidence show that food consumption is one of the main causes that increases the risk of developing an NCD. In this context, policy makers have developed various intervention instruments to promote healthy diet and that lead to healthy habits and thus ensure the welfare of citizens. One of the mechanisms introduced to ensure more informed food purchases that lead to healthier diets is to provide information on the nutritional and health properties that certain food possess. This information is transmitted to consumers through different nutritional and health claims. Despite the high presence of health-related claims in the retailing sector, previous literature indicates that although people understand them, not many consumers report to use them. Hence, more research is needed to explore consumer behavior and food choices for food products that carry nutritional and health information and thus promote sustainable healthy eating.

The special issue deals with the role of nutritional properties and/or health-related claims of food products on welfare of citizens, choice preferences, choice behavior, healthy eating and healthy diet and, the willingness to pay. Papers addressing other interdisciplinary approaches, such as social psychology, food science and food marketing are also welcomed.

Dr. Tiziana de-Magistris
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • non-communicable diseases (NCDs)
  • Health-related claims
  • Functional and novel foods
  • Consumer Preferences
  • Consumer behaviour
  • Sensorial analysis
  • Consumer traits
  • Nutrition
  • Healthy eating
  • Healthy diet
  • Consumption

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Role of Health Information in Consumers’ Willingness to Pay for Canned Crushed Tomatoes Enriched with Lycopene
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2173; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092173 - 10 Sep 2019
Abstract
The paper investigated whether information about the health benefit produced by lycopene could influence consumers’ willingness to pay (WTP) for canned crushed tomatoes enriched with lycopene. An additional aim was to determine whether the main socio-demographic variables, such as sex, age, income and [...] Read more.
The paper investigated whether information about the health benefit produced by lycopene could influence consumers’ willingness to pay (WTP) for canned crushed tomatoes enriched with lycopene. An additional aim was to determine whether the main socio-demographic variables, such as sex, age, income and selected attitudinal factors, affect WTP. To this end, a non-hypothetical experimental auction was carried on with five repeated rounds. Results show a relevant impact of information on WTP in the case of lycopene-enriched products, whereas no difference in bids emerges for the conventional product, either on average or at the quantiles. Previous knowledge seems to have a modest influence upon WTP, but it shows a significant interaction with the information shock provided during the experiment, so that the effect of the latter is more pronounced when previous knowledge is low. In addition, age, sex, food technology neophobia, trust in science and implicit attitudes towards food technology significantly affect participants’ WTP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Choice and Health-Related Claims)
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Open AccessArticle
Trans Fat Labeling Information on Brazilian Packaged Foods
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2130; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092130 - 06 Sep 2019
Abstract
Although the adverse effects of trans fat consumption are well documented, industrially-produced trans fats are still used in a variety of food products. Our objective was to investigate the presence of trans fat information on the nutrition facts panel, in the list of [...] Read more.
Although the adverse effects of trans fat consumption are well documented, industrially-produced trans fats are still used in a variety of food products. Our objective was to investigate the presence of trans fat information on the nutrition facts panel, in the list of ingredients, and the use of trans fat claims in packaged food and beverages marketed in Brazil. This was a cross-sectional study that used data from packaged food and beverages available in the five supermarket chains with the largest market share in Brazil. Of the 11,434 products that were analyzed, 81.3% did not present a source of trans fats in the list of ingredients. The percentages of products with specific (hydrogenated fats or oils) and unspecific trans fat terms (margarine, vegetable fat, and vegetable cream) in the list of ingredients were 4.1% and 14.6%, respectively. Bakery products, cookies and crackers, candies and desserts, snacks, and convenience foods had the highest percentages of trans fat claims. We also found claims in products with ingredients that are sources of trans fats. In conclusion, trans fat ingredients were found in almost one-fifth of the Brazilian packaged foods. The current Brazilian legislation is not sufficient to inform consumers about the content of trans fats in packaged foods. Along with measures to restrict the use of industrially-produced trans fats, improvements in nutritional labeling are also needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Choice and Health-Related Claims)
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Open AccessArticle
Are the Claims to Blame? A Qualitative Study to Understand the Effects of Nutrition and Health Claims on Perceptions and Consumption of Food
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2058; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092058 - 02 Sep 2019
Abstract
Nutrition and Health Claims (NHCs) have been found to influence perceptions of food and consumption behaviour. While previous quantitative research has identified factors that may explain these effects, the current study aimed to address the dearth of in-depth exploration as to the underlying [...] Read more.
Nutrition and Health Claims (NHCs) have been found to influence perceptions of food and consumption behaviour. While previous quantitative research has identified factors that may explain these effects, the current study aimed to address the dearth of in-depth exploration as to the underlying reasons why and how claims may impact upon perceptions and behaviour and the relationships between key factors. Seventy-eight participants took part in 10 focus groups. Discussions were transcribed verbatim and Nvivo 11 was used for thematic analysis. Six themes were developed from the data: 1. Target populations for NHCs; 2. Influence of NHCs on purchasing behaviour; 3. Characteristics/perceptions of products displaying NHCs; 4. Believability of NHCs; 5. Superior yet superficial knowledge; 6. Consumption of products displaying NHCs. Knowledge was a key factor influencing how much individuals believe claims (Believability of NHCs) and their perceptions (Characteristics/perceptions of products displaying NHCs). These perceptions and the characteristics of products displaying claims also impacted believability, as well as purchasing behaviour and consumption. Future research should be cognisant of the role of knowledge and characteristics or perceptions of products in the relationship between NHCs and consumer behaviour, and modelling of these relationships would allow their relative strength to be identified. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Choice and Health-Related Claims)
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Open AccessArticle
Testing Emotional Eating Style in Relation to Willingness to Pay for Nutritional Claims
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1773; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081773 - 01 Aug 2019
Abstract
In face of the high prevalence of non-communicable diseases, nutritional claims represent a useful tool to help people to make healthier food choices. However, recent research notes that when some people experience an intense emotional state, they increase their food consumption, particularly of [...] Read more.
In face of the high prevalence of non-communicable diseases, nutritional claims represent a useful tool to help people to make healthier food choices. However, recent research notes that when some people experience an intense emotional state, they increase their food consumption, particularly of energy-dense and sweet foods. In consequence, this study aims to assess whether emotional eating (EE) style influences the purchase of food products carrying these claims. To this end, a real choice experiment (RCE) was conducted with 306 participants who were asked to evaluate different types of toast. An error component random parameter logit (ECRPL) was used to analyze their preferences for reduced-fat and low-salt claims toast and the effects of the variation of the EE score on individual preferences. Findings of this study suggest that emotional eating negatively impacts purchasing behavior related to nutritional claims. In particular, a decrease of the willingness to pay between 9% and 16% for every unit of toast with nutritional claims was noted when an increase of EE individual score was registered. In this regard, to increase the effectiveness of the nutritional claims, policymakers and private sectors should consider the management of individuals’ emotional states in designing public health policies and marketing strategies, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Choice and Health-Related Claims)
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Open AccessArticle
Qualified Health Claim Language affects Purchase Intentions for Green Tea Products in the United States
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 921; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040921 - 24 Apr 2019
Abstract
Qualified health claims (QHC) describe diet–disease relationships and summarize the quality and strength of evidence for a claim. Companies assert that QHCs increase sales and take legal action to ensure claims reflect their interests. Yet, there is no empirical evidence that QHCs influence [...] Read more.
Qualified health claims (QHC) describe diet–disease relationships and summarize the quality and strength of evidence for a claim. Companies assert that QHCs increase sales and take legal action to ensure claims reflect their interests. Yet, there is no empirical evidence that QHCs influence consumers. Using green tea as a case study, this study investigated the effects of QHCs on purchase intentions among adults 55 years and older living in the US. An online survey using a between-subjects design examined QHCs about the relationship between green tea and the reduced risk of breast and/or prostate cancer or yukichi fruit juice and the reduced risk of gastrocoridalis, a fictitious relationship. QHCs written by a green tea company generated greater perceptions of evidence for the relationship, greater confidence in green tea and cancer, and increased purchase intentions for green tea than other QHCs. Factors that mitigated the claim’s effects on purchase intentions are: Race/ethnicity; age; importance of health claims; supplement use; health; worry about health/becoming sick with cancer; worry that led to dietary change; green tea consumption; and familiarity with the green tea–cancer. Consumers who made health-related dietary change in the past year and consider health claims important indicated greater purchase intentions than others. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Choice and Health-Related Claims)
Open AccessArticle
Perceived Correspondence of Health Effects as a New Determinant Influencing Purchase Intention for Functional Food
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 740; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040740 - 29 Mar 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
This study has revealed the role of a new factor, perceived correspondence of health effects, in consumer acceptance of functional foods. Using a web survey of 1016 people, we hypothesized and verified the following: when an ingredient does not occur naturally in the [...] Read more.
This study has revealed the role of a new factor, perceived correspondence of health effects, in consumer acceptance of functional foods. Using a web survey of 1016 people, we hypothesized and verified the following: when an ingredient does not occur naturally in the carrier but the consumer assigns the same health effect to it as to the carrier, the product’s acceptance will be more positive than it would be if an identical health effect was not associated with the carrier and the functional ingredient. Factors influencing consumer acceptance were examined via binary logistic regression models. According to the results, if a functional food developer fortifies the carrier with an ingredient that does not occur naturally in the carrier, the product can expect higher acceptance if the health effects perceived by consumers are properly matched. In general, it has been found that expected taste and awareness of the product were decisive in all demographic and income groups, whereas perceived correspondence of health effects had a lesser, but still positive influence on acceptance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Choice and Health-Related Claims)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Name: Belinda Lopez-Galán 1, Tiziana de-Magistris1, Vincenzina Caputo 2

Affiliation:

1   Centro de Investigación y Tecnología Agroalimentaria de Aragón, Unidad de Economía Agroalimentaria, Centro de Investigación y Tecnología Agroalimentaria de Aragón, Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2) (CITA-Universidad de Zaragoza)

2   Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Michigan State University

Tentative title: Do I like myself in the mirror? The role of self-acceptance on the willingness to pay for health-related claims.

2. Name: Mario Amato 1; Adele Coppola 2; Francesco La Barbera 1, Fabio Verneau 1

Affiliation:

1   Department of Political Sciences – University of Naples Federico II

2   Department of Agriculture – University of Naples Federico II

Tentative title: Sustainable food styles and consumer behaviour: assessing the effect of claims and communication strategies

3. Name: Begoña Panea. Guillermo Ripoll

Affiliation:

Unidad de Producción animal, Centro de Investigación y Tecnología Agroalimentaria de Aragón

Tentative title: Healthier fermented dry sausage by a reduction of salt and/or fat content

4. Name: Giovanni Sogari 1,3 Davide Menozzi 1, Nicoletta Pellegrini 1, Michele Lefebvre 2, Martina Cirelli 1, Miguel Gomez 3, Cristina Mora 1

Affiliation:

  1. Department of Food and Drug, University of Parma
  2. Director, Nutrition Management, Cornell Dining
  3. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University

Tentative title: How to better frame health claims? Results from a longitudinal study about whole grain pasta

5. Name: Selene Ivette Ornelas Herrera 1, Zein Kallas 2

Affiliation:

1   Institute for Research in Sustainability Science and Technology (IS-UPC), Polytechnic University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain.

2   Center for Research in Agrofood Economy and Development (CREDA-UPC-IRTA), Polytechnic University of Catalonia, Castelldefels, Spain

Tentative title: Health claims in food products: consumers’ perception and willingness to pay: a Review

6. Name: Rosaria Viscecchia 1, Giuseppe Nocella 2, Biagia De Devitiis 1, Francesco Bimbo 1, Domenico Carlucci 3, Gianluca Nardone 1

Affiliation:

1   Department of Science of Agriculture, Food and Environment University of Foggia, IT

2   Department of Food Economics and Marketing, School of Agriculture, Policy and Development University of Reading, UK

3   Department of Agro Environmental and Territorial Sciences University of Bari, IT

Tentative title: Consumers' trade-off between nutrition and health claims according to Regulation 1924/2006: a choice experiment analysis

7. Name: Teresa Del Giudice 1, Rosaria Viscecchia 2, Biagia de Devitiis 2, Carla Cavallo 1

Affiliation:

1   University of Naples Department of Agricultural Sciences

2   Department of Science of Agriculture, Food and Environment University of Foggia

Tentative title: How Sensory attributes and information affect consumers preferences and food healthiness perception?

8. Name: Elena Castellari 1, Stefanella Stranieri 2, Elena ClairRicci e2, Martina Sarnataro 2, Claudio Soregaroli1

Affiliation:

1   Department of Agricultural and Food Economics, Universita' Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

2   Department of Environmental Science and Policy, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 2, 20133 Milano, Italy

Tentative title: The role of health and environmental information on the willingness to pay for an aloe based product

9. Name: Miguel Blasco 1, Mª Teresa Maza 2 y Maria del Mar Campo 1

Affiliation:

1   Departamento de Producción Animal y Ciencia de los Alimentos. Universidad de Zaragoza.

2   Departamento de Ciencias Agrarias y del Medio Natural. Universidad de Zaragoza.

Tentative title: Lamb consumption to promote a healthy diet

10. Name: Azzurra Annunziata, Angela Mariani1

Affiliation:

Department of Economic and Legal Studies, University of Naples Parthenope, Naples (Italy).

Tentative title: Do consumers care about nutrition and health claims? Some evidences from Italy?

11. Name: Azucena Gracia 1,2, Jesús Barreiro-Hurlè 3

Affiliation:

1   Unidad de Economía Agroalimentaria y de los Recursos Naturales. Centro de Investigación y Tecnología Agroalimentaria de Aragón

2   Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón – IA2 (CITA-Universidad de Zaragoza).

3   Agriculture and Life Sciences in the Economy Unit, Institute for Prospective Technological Studies (IPTS), European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC).

Tentative title: How much nutritional claims matter to consumers?

12. Name: Montse Costa-Font, Cesar Revoredo-Giha

Affiliation:

Food Marketing Research, Economy, Environment and Society Department, Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC)

Tentative title: Importance of health claims on the adoption of new breakfast cereals products in the UK

13. Name: Celia Rocha 1, Daniele Asioli 2, Valerie L. Almli 3

Affiliation:

1   University of Porto, Portugal

2   University of Reading, UK

3   Nofima, Norway

Tentative title: Organic consumer choices for nutrients labels on dried strawberries among different health interest groups in Norway, Turkey and Romania

14. Name: Faical Akaichi 1, Jose Maria Gil 2, Cesar Revoredo Giha 1 and Klaus Glenk 1

Affiliation:

1   Department of Rural Economy, Environment and Society, SRUC Central Faculty, Edinburgh, UK

2   CREDA-UPC-IRTA, Barcelona, Spain

Tentative title: Do consumers in the UK and Spain trade off health claim with other claims of desirable meat attributes?

15. Name: Ágoston Temesi 1 ,Ágnes Bacsó 1,Klaus G. Grunert 2; Zoltán Lakner 1

Affiliation:

1   Department of Food Economics, Faculty of Food Science, Szent István University, Budapest, Villányi str. 29-43, Hungary

2   Department of Management and director of the MAPP Centre, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark

Tentative title: Perceived correspondence of health effect as a new determinant influencing purchase intention for functional food

16. Name: Fabio Verneau 1; Francesco La Barbera 1, Marilena Furno 2

Affiliation:

1   Department of Political Sciences – University of Naples Federico II

2   Department of Agriculture – University of Naples Federico II

Tentative title: Functional food and Helath claims: Is information relevant?

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