Special Issue "Nutrition and Apoptosis"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Cristiana Caliceti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University Bologna, Alma Mater Studiorum, Dept of Chemistry “Giacomo Ciamician”, Via Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna, Italy
Interests: cardiovascular system, gut, biosensors, natural compounds, oxidative damage
Prof. Paola Rizzo
E-Mail
Guest Editor
University of Ferrara, Department of Morphology, Surgery and Experimental MedicineVia Fossato di Mortara 64/b 44121—Ferrara, Italy and GVM Care and Research, Maria Cecilia Hospital, Cotignola, Italy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Several bioactive compounds and nutrients in foods and food by-products have physiological properties that are beneficial for human health. Indeed, agricultural and food waste management is a great challenge for global security and environmental governance, directly linked with global competitiveness, increasing population, and other economic related factors. Under the European 2020 growth strategy launched in 2010, Europe has set itself the goal of shifting from linear to circular models of production and consumption. This important issue needs advanced efficient alternatives other that landfilling or composting, in order to maximize the value derived from such an important waste source. The food waste, including both edible food and inedible parts, has been estimated in Europe to be 88 million tonnes (9 million tonnes comes from primary production), costing around 143 billion euros.

In the last decade, increasing attention has been devoted to the recycling of functional ingredients from fruit and vegetable by-products. From the perspective of bio sustainable development and renewable resource technologies, by-products and waste represent a relatively cheap source of material suitable for bioactive molecules production, which would reduce both the amount of waste and the related costs of disposal, while producing added-value nutritional products. While nutrients typically have a clear definition with established levels of recommended intakes, bioactive compounds lack such a definition. There is well-established evidence of the pharmacological properties of these bioactive compounds that render them therapeutically effective in chronic inflammatory diseases such as cardiovascular disease, Crohn, and IBD. In addition, a large amount of information in the literature confirms that nutraceuticals have chemopreventive activity, as suggested by epidemiologic and animal model studies. Their ability to reduce cancer incidence in these studies is likely related to apoptosis.

In this Special Issue, we invite investigators to contribute original research articles reporting data from both experimental and clinical studies, as well as review articles, that provide a better understanding of the effects of nutraceuticals and phytochemicals on cardiometabolic disorders, inflammatory intestinal diseases, and cancer linked to apoptosis, as well as their applications in cosmetic field. Since there has recently been great social and environmental interest in the efficient reuse of agriculture waste co- and by-products, which are often rich in bioactive compounds, papers related to the identification and recovery of such compounds are also encouraged.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • The evaluation of the potential of using nutraceuticals as chemopreventive reagents, or in cardiometabolic and intestinal disorders, or in cosmetic field, by in vitro and in vivo (including studies in human) studies, including the safety, cellular, and molecular mechanisms underlying apoptosis. 3D cell models will also be accepted.
  • High-performance analytical methods suitable for the extraction and purification of the natural compounds from functional foods, dietary supplements, and herbs, for their stability and the study of the bioavailability in vitro and/or in vivo in biological fluids;
  • Bioanalytical methods to determine the biological and toxicological effects of these substances and their effect on the management of cancer and cardiometabolic and intestinal disorders, and in the cosmetic field;
  • The study of the physico- chemical properties of these compounds to develop new formulations that help in ameliorating oxidative stress-induced inflammatory diseases (such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBD) and atheroscelosis)

Dr. Cristiana Caliceti
Prof. Paola Rizzo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Bioactive molecules
  • Endothelial function
  • Cancer
  • Apoptosis
  • Gut
  • Biosensor
  • Dietary compounds
  • Food byproducts
  • Keratinocytes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Vasicinone against Paraquat-Induced MAPK/p53-Mediated Apoptosis via the IGF-1R/PI3K/AKT Pathway in a Parkinson’s Disease-Associated SH-SY5Y Cell Model
Nutrients 2019, 11(7), 1655; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071655 - 19 Jul 2019
Abstract
Vasicinone is a quinazoline alkaloid isolated from the Adhatoda vasica plant. In this study, we explored the neuroprotective effect and underlying molecular mechanism of vasicinone against paraquat-induced cellular apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells. Vasicinone reduced the paraquat-induced loss of cell viability, rescued terminal deoxynucleotide [...] Read more.
Vasicinone is a quinazoline alkaloid isolated from the Adhatoda vasica plant. In this study, we explored the neuroprotective effect and underlying molecular mechanism of vasicinone against paraquat-induced cellular apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells. Vasicinone reduced the paraquat-induced loss of cell viability, rescued terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL)-positive apoptotic nuclei, and suppressed generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a dose-dependent manner. Western blotting analysis revealed that vasicinone increased the phosphorylation of IGF1R/PI3K/AKT cell survival signaling molecules and downregulated the paraquat-induced, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-mediated apoptotic pathways compared to that observed in cells not treated with vasicinone. This protection depended critically on the activation of IGF1R, and the silencing of IGF1R by siRNA completely abrogated the protective effect of vasicinone in SH-SY5Y cells. Our findings indicated that vasicinone is a potential candidate for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and possibly other oxidative stress-related neurodegenerative disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Apoptosis)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Dietary Compounds for Targeting Prostate Cancer
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2401; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102401 - 08 Oct 2019
Abstract
Prostate cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide, and the burden of the disease is increased. Although several chemotherapies have been used, concerns about the side effects have been raised, and development of alternative therapy is inevitable. The purpose of this study [...] Read more.
Prostate cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide, and the burden of the disease is increased. Although several chemotherapies have been used, concerns about the side effects have been raised, and development of alternative therapy is inevitable. The purpose of this study is to prove the efficacy of dietary substances as a source of anti-tumor drugs by identifying their carcinostatic activities in specific pathological mechanisms. According to numerous studies, dietary substances were effective through following five mechanisms; apoptosis, anti-angiogenesis, anti-metastasis, microRNA (miRNA) regulation, and anti-multi-drug-resistance (MDR). About seventy dietary substances showed the anti-prostate cancer activities. Most of the substances induced the apoptosis, especially acting on the mechanism of caspase and poly adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage. These findings support that dietary compounds have potential to be used as anticancer agents as both food supplements and direct clinical drugs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Apoptosis)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.




 

 

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