Special Issue "Edible Fruits and Human Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Begoña Muguerza
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Guest Editor
Nutrigenomics Research Group, Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona, Spain
Interests: bioactive peptides; phenolic compounds; HPLC-MS; hypertension; metabolic syndrome; nutrigenomics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Manuel Suárez Recio
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Guest Editor
Nutrigenomics Research Group, Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona, Spain
Interests: metabolic syndrome; nutrigenomic; HPLC-MS; animal models; metabolomics; polyphenols; bioavailability; phenol characterization; funtional food; bioactive compounds
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The consumption of edible fruits has been linked to several human health effects. Importantly, many of these effects are attributed to phenolic compounds. To link the consumption of these fruits to a health benefit, it is important to fully profile the fruits’ phenolic compositions and study their bioavailability. In this sense, several external and internal factors can modulate the healthy effect of these compounds. For example, agricultural factors that can affect the polyphenolic profile and content, length of fruit administration, and amount ingested, are important external factors to consider. In addition, gender, age, and health status stand out as internal factors to take into account. Considering that the phenolic metabolites present in the target tissues are the actual responsible of these beneficial effects, animal models, in addition to human studies, can be of great help to enhance scientific knowledge about the human health effect of fruit consumption.

In this Special Issue, the most recent findings regarding fruit health effects in both human and animal models are welcomed.

Dr. Begoña Muguerza
Dr. Manuel Suárez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Edible fruits
  • Phenolic compounds
  • Bioavailability
  • Animal models
  • Human studies

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Bitter Orange (Citrus aurantium Linné) Improves Obesity by Regulating Adipogenesis and Thermogenesis through AMPK Activation
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 1988; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11091988 - 22 Aug 2019
Cited by 8
Abstract
Obesity is a global health threat. Herein, we evaluated the underlying mechanism of anti-obese features of bitter orange (Citrus aurantium Linné, CA). Eight-week-administration of CA in high fat diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice resulted in a significant decrease of body weight, adipose tissue [...] Read more.
Obesity is a global health threat. Herein, we evaluated the underlying mechanism of anti-obese features of bitter orange (Citrus aurantium Linné, CA). Eight-week-administration of CA in high fat diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice resulted in a significant decrease of body weight, adipose tissue weight and serum cholesterol. In further in vitro studies, we observed decreased lipid droplets in CA-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Suppressed peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha indicated CA-inhibited adipogenesis. Moreover, CA-treated primary cultured brown adipocytes displayed increased differentiation associated with elevation of thermogenic factors including uncoupling protein 1 and PPARγ coactivator 1 alpha as well. The effects of CA in both adipocytes were abolished in AMP-activated protein kinase alpha (AMPKα)-suppressed environments, suggesting the anti-adipogenic and pro-thermogenic actions of CA were dependent on AMPKα pathway. In conclusion, our results suggest CA as a potential anti-obese agent which regulates adipogenesis and thermogenesis via AMPKα. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Edible Fruits and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Allium porrum Extract Decreases Effector Cell Degranulation and Modulates Airway Epithelial Cell Function
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1303; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061303 - 08 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Allium genus plants, such as leek (Allium porrum), are rich sources of anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant secondary metabolites; this is of interest because it demonstrates their suitability as pharmacological alternatives for inflammatory processes, including allergy treatment. The composition of methanolic leek extract [...] Read more.
Allium genus plants, such as leek (Allium porrum), are rich sources of anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant secondary metabolites; this is of interest because it demonstrates their suitability as pharmacological alternatives for inflammatory processes, including allergy treatment. The composition of methanolic leek extract (LE) was analyzed by GC–MS and LC–IT/MS, and the total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity were quantified by colorimetric methods. Its pharmacological potential was analyzed in human bronchial epithelial Calu-3 cells, human mast cells LAD2, and humanized rat basophiles RBL-2H3. LE exhibited a cytotoxic effect on Calu-3 cells and HumRBL-2H3 cells only at high concentrations and in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, LE decreased the degranulation of LAD2 and HumRBL-2H3 cells. LE treatment also significantly prevented alterations in transepithelial electrical resistance values and mRNA levels of glutathione-S-transferase (GST), c-Jun, and NFκB after treatment with H2O2 in ALI-cultured Calu-3 cells. Finally, ALI-cultured Calu-3 cells treated with LE showed lower permeability to Ole e 1 compared to untreated cells. A reduction in IL-6 secretion in ALI-cultured Calu-3 cells treated with LE was also observed. In summary, the results obtained in this work suggest that A. porrum extract may have potential anti-allergic effects due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. This study provides several important insights into how LE can protect against allergy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Edible Fruits and Human Health)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Fruit and Vegetable Intake and Mental Health in Adults: A Systematic Review
Nutrients 2020, 12(1), 115; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12010115 - 01 Jan 2020
Cited by 21
Abstract
The role of a properly balanced diet in the prevention and treatment of mental disorders has been suggested, while vegetables and fruits have a high content of nutrients that may be of importance in the case of depressive disorders. The aim of the [...] Read more.
The role of a properly balanced diet in the prevention and treatment of mental disorders has been suggested, while vegetables and fruits have a high content of nutrients that may be of importance in the case of depressive disorders. The aim of the study was to conduct a systematic review of the observational studies analyzing association between fruit and vegetable intake and mental health in adults. The search adhered to the guidelines of Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA), and the review was registered in the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO) database (CRD42019138148). A search for peer-reviewed observational studies published until June 2019 was performed in PubMed and Web of Science databases, followed by an additional manual search for publications conducted via analyzing the references of the found studies. With respect to the intake of fruit and/or vegetable, studies that assessed the intake of fruits and/or vegetables, or their processed products (e.g., juices), as a measure expressed in grams or as the number of portions were included. Those studies that assessed the general dietary patterns were not included in the present analysis. With respect to mental health, studies that assessed all the aspects of mental health in both healthy participants and subjects with physical health problems were included, but those conducted in groups of patients with intellectual disabilities, dementia, and eating disorders were excluded. To assess bias, the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale (NOS) was applied. A total of 5911 studies were independently extracted by 2 researchers and verified if they met the inclusion criteria using a 2-stage procedure (based on the title, based on the abstract). After reviewing the full text, a total of 61 studies were selected. A narrative synthesis of the findings from the included studies was performed, which was structured around the type of outcome. The studies included mainly focused on depression and depressive symptoms, but also other characteristics ranging from general and mental well-being, quality of life, sleep quality, life satisfaction, flourishing, mood, self-efficacy, curiosity, creativity, optimism, self-esteem, stress, nervousness, or happiness, to anxiety, minor psychiatric disorders, distress, or attempted suicide, were analyzed. The most prominent results indicated that high total intake of fruits and vegetables, and some of their specific subgroups including berries, citrus, and green leafy vegetables, may promote higher levels of optimism and self-efficacy, as well as reduce the level of psychological distress, ambiguity, and cancer fatalism, and protect against depressive symptoms. However, it must be indicated that the studies included were conducted using various methodologies and in different populations, so their results were not always sufficiently comparable, which is a limitation. Taken together, it can be concluded that fruits and/or vegetables, and some of their specific subgroups, as well as processed fruits and vegetables, seems to have a positive influence on mental health, as stated in the vast majority of the included studies. Therefore, the general recommendation to consume at least 5 portions of fruit and vegetables a day may be beneficial also for mental health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Edible Fruits and Human Health)
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