Special Issue "Bioactive Compounds in the Prevention of Hypertension"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 February 2022) | Viewed by 10155

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Begoña Muguerza
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Nutrigenomics Research Group, Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona, Spain
Interests: bioactive peptides; phenolic compounds; HPLC-MS; hypertension; metabolic syndrome; nutrigenomics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Francisca Isabel Bravo
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Nutrigenomics Research Group, Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona, Spain
Interests: phitochemicals; bioactive peptides; bioactive compounds characterization; antihypertensive activity; molecular biology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays, the leading cause of death worldwide is cardiovascular disease (CVD) and hypertension is one of their major risk factors, suffered by one in four adults. Therefore, the reduction of its prevalence is one of the global targets to be attained. Phytochemicals present in food and agri-food by-products such as phenolic compounds and bioactive peptides have shown to be effective for controlling blood pressure and, improving CVD. These antihypertensive compounds obtained from natural sources have emerged as an excellent alternative to synthetic drugs, and are highly demanded, and searched.

The aim of this special issue is to collect original research manuscripts, meta-analysis and reviews dealing with the beneficial effect of bioactive compounds on hypertension. We invite clinicians and researchers to submit relevant scientific work to this Special Issue. Original research manuscripts, both using human and animal models, focused on the search and evaluation of antihypertensive compounds from diets, as well as original products, extracts, and single molecules from plants, food and agri-food by-products will be considered. Moreover, the in vitro or in vivo studies to elucidate the involved mechanisms in the antihypertensive effect of different bioactive compounds will be also welcomed.

Dr. Begoña Muguerza
Dr. Francisca Isabel Bravo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Hypertension
  • Antihypertensive
  • Bioactive peptides
  • Phenolic compounds
  • Phytochemicals
  • Antioxidants
  • ACE inhibition
  • Endothelial function
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Metabolic syndrome

Published Papers (8 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Obesity-Related Brain Cholinergic System Impairment in High-Fat-Diet-Fed Rats
Nutrients 2022, 14(6), 1243; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14061243 - 15 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 510
Abstract
A link between obesity and cerebral health is receiving growing recognition. Here, we investigate in the frontal cortex and hippocampus the potential involvement of cholinergic markers in brain alterations previously reported in rats with obesity induced by diet (DIO) after long-term exposure (17 [...] Read more.
A link between obesity and cerebral health is receiving growing recognition. Here, we investigate in the frontal cortex and hippocampus the potential involvement of cholinergic markers in brain alterations previously reported in rats with obesity induced by diet (DIO) after long-term exposure (17 weeks) to a high-fat diet (HFD) in comparison with animals fed with a standard diet (CHOW). The obesity developed after 5 weeks of HFD. Bodyweight, systolic blood pressure, glycemia, and insulin levels were increased in DIO rats compared to the CHOW group. Measurements of malondialdehyde (MDA) provided lipid peroxidation in HFD-fed rats. Western blot and immunohistochemical techniques were performed. Our results showed a higher expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) in obese rats but not the VAChT expression in the frontal cortex after 17 weeks of HFD. Furthermore, the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme was downregulated in HFD both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. In the brain regions analyzed, it was reported a modulation of certain cholinergic receptors expressed pre- and post-synaptically (alpha7 nicotinic receptor and muscarinic receptor subtype 1). Collectively, these findings point out precise changes of cholinergic markers that can be targeted to prevent cerebral injuries related to obesity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds in the Prevention of Hypertension)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Red-Fleshed Apples Rich in Anthocyanins and White-Fleshed Apples Modulate the Aorta and Heart Proteome in Hypercholesterolaemic Rats: The AppleCOR Study
Nutrients 2022, 14(5), 1047; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14051047 - 28 Feb 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 811
Abstract
The impact of a red-fleshed apple (RFA) rich in anthocyanins (ACNs), a white-fleshed apple (WFA) without ACNs, and an extract infusion from Aronia fruit (AI) equivalent in dose of cyanidin-3-O-galactoside (main ACN) as RFA was determined by the proteome profile of aorta and [...] Read more.
The impact of a red-fleshed apple (RFA) rich in anthocyanins (ACNs), a white-fleshed apple (WFA) without ACNs, and an extract infusion from Aronia fruit (AI) equivalent in dose of cyanidin-3-O-galactoside (main ACN) as RFA was determined by the proteome profile of aorta and heart as key cardiovascular tissues. Hypercholesterolaemic Wistar rats were separated into six groups (n = 6/group; three males and three females) and the proteomic profiles were analyzed using nanoliquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. No adverse events were reported and all products were well tolerated. RFA downregulated C1QB and CFP in aorta and CRP in heart. WFA downregulated C1QB and CFP in aorta and C9 and C3 in aorta and heart, among other proteins. AI downregulated PRKACA, IQGAP1, and HSP90AB1 related to cellular signaling. Thus, both apples showed an anti-inflammatory effect through the complement system, while RFA reduced CRP. Regardless of the ACN content, an apple matrix effect was observed that involved different bioactive components, and inflammatory proteins were reduced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds in the Prevention of Hypertension)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Effects of an Optimized Aged Garlic Extract on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Moderate Hypercholesterolemic Subjects: A Randomized, Crossover, Double-Blind, Sustainedand Controlled Study
Nutrients 2022, 14(3), 405; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14030405 - 18 Jan 2022
Viewed by 2707
Abstract
The consumption of aged black garlic (ABG) has been related to improvements in several cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. However, the extent of the beneficial effects depends on the garlic aging process and the amount and type of chemical compounds accumulated. The main [...] Read more.
The consumption of aged black garlic (ABG) has been related to improvements in several cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. However, the extent of the beneficial effects depends on the garlic aging process and the amount and type of chemical compounds accumulated. The main objective of this study was to assess the effect of daily intake of a well-characterized ABG extract with a standardized S-allyl-L-cysteine (SAC) yield in combination with dietary recommendations regarding CVD risk factors in individuals with moderate hypercholesterolemia. Sixty-seven hypercholesterolemic individuals with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels ≥115 mg/dL were randomized in a crossover, double-blind, sustained, and controlled intervention study. The participants consumed 250 mg (1.25 mg SAC)/tablet/day ABG or a placebo for 6 weeks, with 3 weeks of washout. Blood and pulse pressure and other CVD risk biomarkers were determined at the beginning and end of each intervention. At 6 weeks, ABG extract reduced diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (mean (95% CI) −5.85 (−10.5; −1.3) mm Hg) compared to the placebo, particularly in men with a DBP > 75 mm Hg. The consumption of an improved ABG extract with 1.25 mg of SAC decreased DBP, particularly in men with moderate hypercholesterolemia. The potential beneficial effects of ABG may contribute to obtaining an optimal DBP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds in the Prevention of Hypertension)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Coffee Consumption and Blood Pressure: Results of the Second Wave of the Cognition of Older People, Education, Recreational Activities, Nutrition, Comorbidities, and Functional Capacity Studies (COPERNICUS)
Nutrients 2021, 13(10), 3372; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13103372 - 25 Sep 2021
Viewed by 853
Abstract
This study examined the relationship between the frequency of coffee consumption and blood pressure over a two year follow up of a cohort of elderly people. Healthy, older people (N = 205) were examined at baseline and at two years. Participants completed physical [...] Read more.
This study examined the relationship between the frequency of coffee consumption and blood pressure over a two year follow up of a cohort of elderly people. Healthy, older people (N = 205) were examined at baseline and at two years. Participants completed physical and behavioural assessments, which included body composition, current pharmacological treatment, and frequency of coffee consumption grouped into three categories: “never to a few times per month”, “once a week to a few times per week”, and “every day”. Blood pressure (systolic (sBP), diastolic (dBP), mean (mBP), and pulse pressure (PP)) was measured at baseline and after two years. After adjusting for body composition, smoking status, age, sex, heart rate, and number of antihypertensive agents taken, participants who drank coffee everyday had a significant increase in sBP, with a mean of 8.63 (1.27; 15.77) and an mBP, with a mean of 5.55 mmHg (0.52; 10.37) after two years (t = 2.37, p = 0.02 and t = 2.17, p = 0.03, respectively) compared to participants who never or very rarely (up to a few times per month) drank coffee. DBP and PP were not affected by coffee consumption frequency in a statistically significant manner. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds in the Prevention of Hypertension)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Administration with Quinoa Protein Reduces the Blood Pressure in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats and Modifies the Fecal Microbiota
Nutrients 2021, 13(7), 2446; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13072446 - 17 Jul 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1050
Abstract
Despite the well-established role of quinoa protein as the source of antihypertensive peptides through in vitro enzymolysis, there is little evidence supporting the in vivo antihypertensive effect of intact quinoa protein. In this study, in vivo study on spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) was [...] Read more.
Despite the well-established role of quinoa protein as the source of antihypertensive peptides through in vitro enzymolysis, there is little evidence supporting the in vivo antihypertensive effect of intact quinoa protein. In this study, in vivo study on spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) was conducted by administering quinoa protein for five weeks. Gastrointestinal content identification indicated that many promising precursors of bioactive peptides were released from quinoa protein under gastrointestinal processing. Quinoa protein administration on SHRs resulted in a significant decrease in blood pressure, a significant increase in alpha diversity, and microbial structure alternation towards that in non-hypertension rats. Furthermore, blood pressure was highly negatively correlated with the elevated abundance of genera in quinoa protein-treated SHRs, such as Turicibacter and Allobaculum. Interestingly, the fecal microbiota in quinoa protein-treated SHRs shared more features in the composition of genera with non-hypertension rats than that of the captopril-treated group. These results indicate that quinoa protein may serve as a potential candidate to lower blood pressure and ameliorate hypertension-related gut dysbiosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds in the Prevention of Hypertension)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Blood Pressure-Lowering Effect of Wine Lees: Dose-Response Study, Effect of Dealcoholization and Possible Mechanisms of Action
Nutrients 2021, 13(4), 1142; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13041142 - 30 Mar 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1513
Abstract
The antihypertensive effect of wine lees (WL) has been previously evidenced. In this study, the antihypertensive properties of different doses of WL were evaluated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In addition, the blood pressure (BP)-lowering effect of dried (dealcoholized) WL powder (WLPW) and [...] Read more.
The antihypertensive effect of wine lees (WL) has been previously evidenced. In this study, the antihypertensive properties of different doses of WL were evaluated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In addition, the blood pressure (BP)-lowering effect of dried (dealcoholized) WL powder (WLPW) and the mechanisms involved in its functionality were investigated. Furthermore, a possible hypotensive effect of WLPW was discarded in Wistar–Kyoto (WKY) rats. The administration of WL at different doses caused a dose-dependent decrease in BP of SHR up to 5.0 mL/kg bw, exhibiting the maximum decrease at 6 h post-administration. WLPW caused a greater drop in BP than WL, showing an antihypertensive effect higher and more prolonged than the drug Captopril. Moreover, the BP-lowering effect of WLPW was specific to the hypertensive state since an undesirable hypotensive effect in normotensive WKY rats was ruled out. Finally, WLPW improved oxidative stress and increased the activity of the antioxidant endogen system of SHR. These results suggest that WLPW could be used as functional ingredient for foods or nutraceuticals to ameliorate hypertension. Nevertheless, further clinical studies are needed to evaluate its long-term antihypertensive efficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds in the Prevention of Hypertension)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Role of Chrononutrition in the Antihypertensive Effects of Natural Bioactive Compounds
Nutrients 2022, 14(9), 1920; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14091920 - 04 May 2022
Viewed by 563
Abstract
Hypertension (HTN) is one of the main cardiovascular risk factors and is considered a major public health problem. Numerous approaches have been developed to lower blood pressure (BP) in hypertensive patients, most of them involving pharmacological treatments. Within this context, natural bioactive compounds [...] Read more.
Hypertension (HTN) is one of the main cardiovascular risk factors and is considered a major public health problem. Numerous approaches have been developed to lower blood pressure (BP) in hypertensive patients, most of them involving pharmacological treatments. Within this context, natural bioactive compounds have emerged as a promising alternative to drugs in HTN prevention. This work reviews not only the mechanisms of BP regulation by these antihypertensive compounds, but also their efficacy depending on consumption time. Although a plethora of studies has investigated food-derived compounds, such as phenolic compounds or peptides and their impact on BP, only a few addressed the relevance of time consumption. However, it is known that BP and its main regulatory mechanisms show a 24-h oscillation. Moreover, evidence shows that phenolic compounds can interact with clock genes, which regulate the biological rhythm followed by many physiological processes. Therefore, further research might be carried out to completely elucidate the interactions along the time–nutrition–hypertension axis within the framework of chrononutrition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds in the Prevention of Hypertension)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review
The Effect of Dietary Polyphenols on Vascular Health and Hypertension: Current Evidence and Mechanisms of Action
Nutrients 2022, 14(3), 545; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14030545 - 27 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1166
Abstract
The aim of this review was to explore existing evidence from studies conducted on humans and summarize the mechanisms of action of dietary polyphenols on vascular health, blood pressure and hypertension. There is evidence that some polyphenol-rich foods, including berry fruits rich in [...] Read more.
The aim of this review was to explore existing evidence from studies conducted on humans and summarize the mechanisms of action of dietary polyphenols on vascular health, blood pressure and hypertension. There is evidence that some polyphenol-rich foods, including berry fruits rich in anthocyanins, cocoa and green tea rich in flavan-3-ols, almonds and pistachios rich in hydroxycinnamic acids, and soy products rich in isoflavones, are able to improve blood pressure levels. A variety of mechanisms can elucidate the observed effects. Some limitations of the evidence, including variability of polyphenol content in plant-derived foods and human absorption, difficulty disentangling the effects of polyphenols from other dietary compounds, and discrepancy of doses between animal and human studies should be taken into account. While no single food counteracts hypertension, adopting a plant-based dietary pattern including a variety of polyphenol-rich foods is an advisable practice to improve blood pressure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds in the Prevention of Hypertension)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop