Special Issue "Dietary Curcumin and Health Effects"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Roberta Masella
Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Superiore Di Sanita, Ctr Gender Specif Med, Viale Regina Elena 299, I-00161 Rome, Italy
Interests: nutrition and health; nutrient–genes interaction; nutrient as modulator of signalling pathways; nutritional diseases; gender/sex differences
Dr. Francesca Cirulli
Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Superiore Di Sanita, Rome, Department of Cell Biology and Neurosciences, Rome, Italy
Interests: stress; oxidative stress; neuroendocrine interaction; mental disorders

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Curcumin is a pleiotropic compound found in the rhizome of Curcuma longa (turmeric). Curcuma longa is widely used as a spice, especially in Asian countries, but today, it is consumed as dietary component and supplement worldwide. Curcumin has been eliciting great interest because of its potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anticancer properties. It has been shown that curcumin might target multiple signaling molecules modulating a number of cellular activities, most likely responsible for its health benefits. In particular, due to its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties, curcumin has been considered as an effective tool in preventing and counteracting chronic–degenerative diseases, very often associated with obesity and aging, such as cardiovascular diseases, metabolic dysfunctions, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer, whose etiopathogenesis supports a pivotal role for oxidative and inflammatory processes. However, despite its reported benefits, one of the major problems with ingesting curcumin by itself is its poor bioavailability, which results from poor absorption, rapid metabolism, and rapid elimination. Therefore, great efforts have been made to improve curcumin’s bioavailability by addressing these various mechanisms. We aim at collecting the most advanced data on this topic with a multifaceted and multidisciplinary approach with the ultimate objective to improve research and move forward the field.

Dr. Roberta Masella
Dr. Francesca Cirulli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Chemistry
  • Metabolism
  • Bioavailability
  • Molecular mechanisms of action
  • Diet
  • Supplements
  • Interaction with other dietary components
  • Aging
  • Neurodegeneration
  • Metabolic diseases
  • Cancer Oxidative processes
  • Inflammation
  • Anxiety and mood disorders
  • Adjuvant in therapy

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
An Exploratory Analysis of Changes in Mental Wellbeing Following Curcumin and Fish Oil Supplementation in Middle-Aged and Older Adults
Nutrients 2020, 12(10), 2902; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12102902 - 23 Sep 2020
Abstract
Curcumin has previously been shown to enhance mood in non-depressed older adults. However, observed benefits were limited to short-term supplementation (4 weeks). In a 16 week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 × 2 factorial design trial, we supplemented overweight or obese non-depressed adults (50–80 [...] Read more.
Curcumin has previously been shown to enhance mood in non-depressed older adults. However, observed benefits were limited to short-term supplementation (4 weeks). In a 16 week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 × 2 factorial design trial, we supplemented overweight or obese non-depressed adults (50–80 years) with curcumin (160 mg/day), fish oil (2000 mg docosahexaenoic acid +400 mg eicosapentaenoic acid/day), or a combination of both. Secondary outcomes included mental wellbeing measures (mood states and subjective memory complaints (SMCs)) and quality of life (QoL). Furthermore, plasma apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4) was measured to determine whether APOE4 status influences responses to fish oil. Curcumin improved vigour (p = 0.044) compared to placebo and reduced SMCs compared to no curcumin treatment (p = 0.038). Fish oil did not affect any mood states, SMCs or QoL; however, responses to fish oil were affected by APOE4 status. In APOE4 non-carriers, fish oil increased vigour (p = 0.030) and reduced total mood disturbances (p = 0.048) compared to placebo. Improvements in mental wellbeing were correlated with increased QoL. Combining curcumin with fish oil did not result in additive effects. This exploratory analysis indicates that regular supplementation with either curcumin or fish oil (limited to APOE4 non-carriers) has the potential to improve some aspects of mental wellbeing in association with better QoL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Curcumin and Health Effects)
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Open AccessArticle
Dietary Supplementation with Curcumin Reduce Circulating Levels of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β and Islet Amyloid Polypeptide in Adults with High Risk of Type 2 Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease
Nutrients 2020, 12(4), 1032; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12041032 - 09 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Dietary supplementation with curcumin has been previously reported to have beneficial effects in people with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes (T2D) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This study investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with curcumin on key peptides implicated in insulin resistance in [...] Read more.
Dietary supplementation with curcumin has been previously reported to have beneficial effects in people with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes (T2D) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This study investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with curcumin on key peptides implicated in insulin resistance in individuals with high risk of developing T2D. Plasma samples from participants recruited for a randomised controlled trial with curcumin (180 mg/day) for 12 weeks were analysed for circulating glycogen synthase kinase-3 β (GSK-3β) and islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). Outcome measures were determined using ELISA kits. The homeostasis model for assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was measured as parameters of glycaemic control. Curcumin supplementation significantly reduced circulating GSK-3β (−2.4 ± 0.4 ng/mL vs. −0.3 ± 0.6, p = 0.0068) and IAPP (−2.0 ± 0.7 ng/mL vs. 0.4 ± 0.6, p = 0.0163) levels compared with the placebo group. Curcumin supplementation significantly reduced insulin resistance (−0.3 ± 0.1 vs. 0.01 ± 0.05, p = 0.0142) compared with placebo group. Dietary supplementation with curcumin reduced circulating levels of IAPP and GSK-3β, thus suggesting a novel mechanism through which curcumin could potentially be used for alleviating insulin resistance related markers for reducing the risk of T2D and AD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Curcumin and Health Effects)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Curcumin: Could This Compound Be Useful in Pregnancy and Pregnancy-Related Complications?
Nutrients 2020, 12(10), 3179; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103179 - 17 Oct 2020
Abstract
Curcumin, the main polyphenol contained in turmeric root (Curcuma longa), has played a significant role in medicine for centuries. The growing interest in plant-derived substances has led to increased consumption of them also in pregnancy. The pleiotropic and multi-targeting actions of [...] Read more.
Curcumin, the main polyphenol contained in turmeric root (Curcuma longa), has played a significant role in medicine for centuries. The growing interest in plant-derived substances has led to increased consumption of them also in pregnancy. The pleiotropic and multi-targeting actions of curcumin have made it very attractive as a health-promoting compound. In spite of the beneficial effects observed in various chronic diseases in humans, limited and fragmentary information is currently available about curcumin’s effects on pregnancy and pregnancy-related complications. It is known that immune-metabolic alterations occurring during pregnancy have consequences on both maternal and fetal tissues, leading to short- and long-term complications. The reported anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antitoxicant, neuroprotective, immunomodulatory, antiapoptotic, antiangiogenic, anti-hypertensive, and antidiabetic properties of curcumin appear to be encouraging, not only for the management of pregnancy-related disorders, including gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), preeclampsia (PE), depression, preterm birth, and fetal growth disorders but also to contrast damage induced by natural and chemical toxic agents. The current review summarizes the latest data, mostly obtained from animal models and in vitro studies, on the impact of curcumin on the molecular mechanisms involved in pregnancy pathophysiology, with the aim to shed light on the possible beneficial and/or adverse effects of curcumin on pregnancy outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Curcumin and Health Effects)
Open AccessReview
Interaction between Gut Microbiota and Curcumin: A New Key of Understanding for the Health Effects of Curcumin
Nutrients 2020, 12(9), 2499; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092499 - 19 Aug 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Curcumin, a lipophilic polyphenol contained in the rhizome of Curcuma longa (turmeric), has been used for centuries in traditional Asian medicine, and nowadays it is widely used in food as dietary spice worldwide. It has received considerable attention for its pharmacological activities, which [...] Read more.
Curcumin, a lipophilic polyphenol contained in the rhizome of Curcuma longa (turmeric), has been used for centuries in traditional Asian medicine, and nowadays it is widely used in food as dietary spice worldwide. It has received considerable attention for its pharmacological activities, which appear to act primarily through anti-inflammatory and antioxidant mechanisms. For this reason, it has been proposed as a tool for the management of many diseases, among which are gastrointestinal and neurological diseases, diabetes, and several types of cancer. However, the pharmacology of curcumin remains to be elucidated; indeed, a discrepancy exists between the well-documented in vitro and in vivo activities of curcumin and its poor bioavailability and chemical instability that should limit any therapeutic effect. Recently, it has been hypothesized that curcumin could exert direct regulative effects primarily in the gastrointestinal tract, where high concentrations of this polyphenol have been detected after oral administration. Consequently, it might be hypothesized that curcumin directly exerts its regulatory effects on the gut microbiota, thus explaining the paradox between its low systemic bioavailability and its wide pharmacological activities. It is well known that the microbiota has several important roles in human physiology, and its composition can be influenced by a multitude of environmental and lifestyle factors. Accordingly, any perturbations in gut microbiome profile or dysbiosis can have a key role in human disease progression. Interestingly, curcumin and its metabolites have been shown to influence the microbiota. It is worth noting that from the interaction between curcumin and microbiota two different phenomena arise: the regulation of intestinal microflora by curcumin and the biotransformation of curcumin by gut microbiota, both of them potentially crucial for curcumin activity. This review summarizes the most recent studies on this topic, highlighting the strong connection between curcumin and gut microbiota, with the final aim of adding new insight into the potential mechanisms by which curcumin exerts its effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Curcumin and Health Effects)
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Open AccessReview
The Use of Curcumin as a Complementary Therapy in Ulcerative Colitis: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials
Nutrients 2020, 12(8), 2296; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082296 - 31 Jul 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The objective of this study was to systematically review the literature to verify the efficacy and safety of curcumin as a complementary therapy for the maintenance or induction of remission in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A comprehensive search was conducted by [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to systematically review the literature to verify the efficacy and safety of curcumin as a complementary therapy for the maintenance or induction of remission in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A comprehensive search was conducted by two independent authors in MEDLINE (PubMed), Scopus, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, Lilacs, Food Science and Technology Abstracts, and ScienceDirect. The search terms “curcumin”, “curcuma”, “inflammatory bowel disease”, “proctocolitis”, “crohn disease”, and “inflammation” were combined to create search protocols. This study considered randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in any language before March 2020 that evaluated the effects of curcumin on inflammatory activity and the maintenance or remission of IBD patients. After duplicates were removed, 989 trials were identified, but only 11 met the eligibility criteria. Five of these were considered to be biased and were excluded. Therefore, six trials were considered in this review. All the studies included in the systematic review were placebo-controlled RCTs conducted on individuals with ulcerative colitis (UC). All the RCTs reported that curcumin was well tolerated and was not associated with any serious side effects. Studies show that curcumin may be a safe, effective therapy for maintaining remission in UC when administered with standard treatments. However, the same cannot be stated for Crohn’s disease due to the lack of low bias risk studies. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed before curcumin can be recommended as a complementary therapy for UC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Curcumin and Health Effects)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Author: Massimo D’Archivio

Title: Interaction between gut microbiota and curcumin: a new key of understanding for the health effects of curcumin

Author: Santangelo Carmela 

Title: Curcumin in pregnancy: could this spice be useful in pregnancy and pregnancy-related complications?

Author: Katarzyna Lubecka

Title: Curcumin from turmeric rhizome: a potential modulator of DNA methylation machinery in breast cancer inhibition

Author: Alba Di Pardo

Title: The potential benefit of Curcumin on gut-brain axis in neurological disorders

Author: Rosaria Varì

Title: Obesity-associated inflammation: does curcumin exert a beneficial role? 

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