Special Issue "Child Obesity and Nutrition Promotion Intervention"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 July 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ana Isabel Rito
Website
Guest Editor
Center for Studies and Research in Social Dynamics and Health & National Institute of Health Doutor Ricardo Jorge, I.P., 1649-016 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: childhood obesity—epidemiology and surveillance; childhood obesity—determinants and interactions among multiple etiological factors and with co morbidities; research concerning intervention sustainability and maintenance of intervention effects; community-based interventions—family and school settings; school-based initiatives on promotion of healthy and sustainable child nutrition and diet; children’s food and dietary surveys

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Childhood obesity continues to be a global problem, with several regions showing increasing rates and others, despite an apparent halt or downward trend, still having one in every three children overweight. Children are exposed to nutritional, social, and obesogenic environmental risks at different settings, and this affects their lifelong health. There is an increasing consensus that high-quality multifaceted smart and cost-effective interventions enable children to grow with a healthy set of habits that have lifelong benefits to their wellbeing. Literature has shown that the dietary approach plays a key role in improving children’s health, not only on a nutritional level but also on diet quality and patterns. An association of the nutritional strategy with other lifestyle components promotes a more comprehensive approach and should be envisioned in intervention studies. This Special Issue entitled “Child Obesity and Nutrition Promotion Intervention” welcomes the submission of either original research manuscripts or reviews of the scientific literature, concerning classical or innovative approaches to tackle this public health issue. We welcome nutrition interventions in interaction with other lifestyle health promoters, with outcome indicators of effectiveness and sustainability from the traditional to ground-breaking ways exploiting both qualitative and quantitative approaches on tackling child obesity.

Dr. Ana Isabel Rito
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Childhood obesity
  • Childhood overweight
  • Health intervention
  • Diet
  • Nutrition
  • Lifestyle
  • Behaviour
  • Children
  • Community-based interventions

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Dietary Habits in Children with Respiratory Allergies: A Single-Center Polish Pilot Study
Nutrients 2020, 12(5), 1521; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051521 (registering DOI) - 23 May 2020
Abstract
Background: The rising trend in allergic diseases has developed in parallel with the increasing prevalence of obesity, suggesting a possible association. The links between eating habits and allergies have not been sufficiently clarified. Aim: To evaluate the nutritional status, eating habits, and risk [...] Read more.
Background: The rising trend in allergic diseases has developed in parallel with the increasing prevalence of obesity, suggesting a possible association. The links between eating habits and allergies have not been sufficiently clarified. Aim: To evaluate the nutritional status, eating habits, and risk factors of obesity and pulmonary function in children with allergic rhinitis. Materials and methods: We evaluated 106 children with allergic rhinitis (mean age 12.1 ± 3.4 years; M/F 60/46) from the Department of Allergology. Clinical data were collected regarding allergies, physical activity, nutritional status (Bodystat), dietary habits (Food Frequency Questionnaire validated for the Polish population), skin prick test with aeroallergens (Allergopharma), and spirometry (Jaeger). Results: All children suffered from allergic rhinitis; among them, 43 (40.6%) presented symptoms of asthma. There were differences between children with only allergic rhinitis (AR group) and children with both rhinitis and asthma (AA group) in pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 100 ± 11 vs. 92.1 ± 15.0; p < 0.05). A total of 84 children (79%) presented a normal body mass index (BMI) (10–97 percentile), 8 (7.5%) were underweight, and 14 (13.5%) were overweight or obese. There were no differences in body composition between the AR and AA groups. Incorrect eating habits were demonstrated by most of the children, e.g., consumption of three or fewer meals in a day (38%), sweets every day (44%), snacking between meals every day (80%), and eating meals less than 1 h before bedtime (47%). Compared to the AR group, the AA group was more likely to eat more meals a day (p = 0.04), snack more often (p = 0.04), and eat before sleeping (p = 0.005). Multiple regression analysis showed a significant association between high BMI and snacking between meals and low physical activity (adjusted R2 = 0.97; p < 0.05). Conclusions: The risk factors for obesity in children with allergies include snacking and low physical activity. Most children with respiratory allergies, especially those with asthma, reported incorrect eating habits such as snacking and eating before bedtime. A correlation between pulmonary function and body composition or dietary habits was not found. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Obesity and Nutrition Promotion Intervention)
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Open AccessArticle
A Serious Game Approach to Improve Food Behavior in Families—A Pilot Study
Nutrients 2020, 12(5), 1415; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051415 - 14 May 2020
Abstract
The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the effect of a specially developed serious game to improve food behavior in families with children aged 5–13 years using mixed methods. Fourteen families were randomized into a game-group and a non-game-group and divided [...] Read more.
The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the effect of a specially developed serious game to improve food behavior in families with children aged 5–13 years using mixed methods. Fourteen families were randomized into a game-group and a non-game-group and divided into age groups (game-children (GC), game-parents (GP), non-game-children (nGC), and non-game-parents (nGP)). The families completed a baseline test, a three-week intervention period with or without a game element, and a follow-up test. Qualitative results showed a positive change in food behavior in all families. Quantitative results mainly showed an effect in food neophobia as a decrease was seen in all groups; however, it was only significant (p < 0.05) in three groups (GP, nGC, nGP). No changes were seen in willingness to taste, and only limited changes in liking and number of words used to describe the stimuli. In conclusion, qualitative results showed positive change in the children’s food behavior in most families, indicating a positive effect of performing tastings and tasks together as a family—regardless of the presence of a game element. However, this was not as clear in the quantitative data, indicating that current quantitative tools are less suited to measure complex concepts like willingness to taste. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Obesity and Nutrition Promotion Intervention)
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