Special Issue "Nutrition and Athletic Performance"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Sports Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Stephen Ives
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Health and Human Physiological Sciences, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY, USA
Interests: Muscle; Exercise science; Cardiovascular physiology; Exercise physiology; Atherosclerosis; Exercise

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Exercise necessitates increased energy production to match the elevated demand of physical activity, the magnitude of which varies significantly by activity, sport, and/or athletic position. While long term nutritional habitus is known to impact exercise performance, short term or acute nutritional strategies may also prove beneficial, or detrimental, to athletic performance.  Modifications to macro- or micro-nutrient intakes likely influence athletic capacity through the altered metabolic capacity, although cardiovascular, respiratory, or neurocognitive effects are not to be discounted as possibly being influenced by altering the nutritional approach. Similarly, dietary supplementation with factors such as probiotics or antioxidants, either acutely or chronically, is also a likely avenue in which to optimize athletic performance. Supplementation, or the timing of supplementation, diurnally or with activity, may help to bridge gaps between dietary intakes and needs, perhaps as a result of either an inadequate intake and/or high level of athletic demand via high intensity, frequency, volume, or a combination thereof. Altering nutritional strategy for athletic performance is a de facto approach employed by athletes, often occurring seemingly independent of knowledge or evidence for or against a particular strategy. Rigorous studies of nutritional manipulation, supplementation, or those exploring the temporal optimization of nutrition or supplementation are desperately needed in an ever-changing sports nutrition landscape with an increasingly larger audience.

Accordingly, this Special Issue seeks submissions of manuscripts describing original research or analytical reviews, with particular focus on the effects on exercise or athletic performance. Although work in humans may be preferential in translational strength, mechanistic work in animals may also prove valuable fodder for further work in humans, and is welcomed.

Dr. Stephen Ives
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sport
  • Exercise
  • Athletes performance
  • Supplementation
  • Timing
  • Acute
  • Chronic

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
The Effects of Low- and High-Glycemic Index Sport Nutrition Bars on Metabolism and Performance in Recreational Soccer Players
Nutrients 2020, 12(4), 982; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12040982 - 02 Apr 2020
Abstract
Consumption of low-glycemic index (GI) carbohydrates (CHO) may be superior to high-GI CHO before exercise by increasing fat oxidation and decreasing carbohydrate oxidation. We compared the effects of pre-exercise feeding of a low-GI lentil-based sports nutrition bar with a high-GI bar on metabolism [...] Read more.
Consumption of low-glycemic index (GI) carbohydrates (CHO) may be superior to high-GI CHO before exercise by increasing fat oxidation and decreasing carbohydrate oxidation. We compared the effects of pre-exercise feeding of a low-GI lentil-based sports nutrition bar with a high-GI bar on metabolism and performance during a simulated soccer match. Using a randomized, double-blind, counterbalanced, crossover design, participants (n = 8) consumed 1.5 g/kg available CHO from a low-GI bar (GI = 45) or high-GI bar (GI = 101) two hours before a 90 min simulated soccer match, and 0.38 g/kg body mass during a 15 min half-time break. The test involved alternating 6 min intervals of paced jogging, running, walking, and sprinting, and 3 min intervals of soccer-specific skills (timed ball dribbling, agility running, heading, kicking accuracy). Carbohydrate oxidation rate was lower during the match after consuming the low-GI compared to high-GI bar (2.17 ± 0.6 vs. 2.72 ± 0.4 g/min; p < 0.05). Participants performed better during the low-GI versus high-GI bar condition on the agility test (5.7 ± 0.4 versus 6.1 ± 0.6 s; p < 0.01) and heading (i.e., jumping height 24.7 ± 4.3 versus 22.2 ± 4.5 cm; p < 0.01) late in the soccer match (72 min). A low-GI lentil-based sports nutrition bar provides a metabolic benefit (lower carbohydrate oxidation rate) and a modest improvement in agility running and jumping height (heading) late in the test. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Athletic Performance)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Modulation of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage, Inflammation, and Oxidative Markers by Curcumin Supplementation in a Physically Active Population: A Systematic Review
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 501; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020501 - 15 Feb 2020
Abstract
Physical activity, particularly high-intensity eccentric muscle contractions, produces exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). The breakdown of muscle fibers and the consequent inflammatory responses derived from EIMD affect exercise performance. Curcumin, a natural polyphenol extracted from turmeric, has been shown to have mainly antioxidant and [...] Read more.
Physical activity, particularly high-intensity eccentric muscle contractions, produces exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). The breakdown of muscle fibers and the consequent inflammatory responses derived from EIMD affect exercise performance. Curcumin, a natural polyphenol extracted from turmeric, has been shown to have mainly antioxidant and also anti-inflammatory properties. This effect of curcumin could improve EIMD and exercise performance. The main objective of this systematic review was to critically evaluate the effectiveness of curcumin supplementation on EIMD and inflammatory and oxidative markers in a physically active population. A structured search was carried out following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines in the databases SCOPUS, Web of Science (WOS), and Medline (PubMed) from inception to October 2019. The search included original articles with randomized controlled crossover or parallel design in which the intake of curcumin administered before and/or after exercise was compared with an identical placebo situation. No filters were applied to the type of physical exercise performed, the sex or the age of the participants. Of the 301 articles identified in the search, 11 met the established criteria and were included in this systematic review. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed using the McMaster Critical Review Form. The use of curcumin reduces the subjective perception of the intensity of muscle pain; reduces muscle damage through the decrease of creatine kinase (CK); increases muscle performance; has an anti-inflammatory effect by modulating the pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8; and may have a slight antioxidant effect. In summary, the administration of curcumin at a dose between 150–1500 mg/day before and during exercise, and up until 72 h’ post-exercise, improved performance by reducing EIMD and modulating the inflammation caused by physical activity. In addition, humans appear to be able to tolerate high doses of curcumin without significant side-effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Athletic Performance)
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