The Role of Nutraceuticals in Central Nervous System Disorders

A special issue of Nutraceuticals (ISSN 1661-3821).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2025 | Viewed by 2572

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Biological Sciences, Knoebel Institute for Healthy Aging, University of Denver, Denver, CO 80208, USA
Interests: nutraceuticals; antioxidants; neuronal apoptosis; neurodegeneration; neurotrauma; neuroinflammation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Central nervous system (CNS) disorders span a wide range of ailments including neurodegenerative diseases and neuropsychological disorders, as well as neuronal injury subsequent to infection or trauma (e.g., traumatic brain injury). Although the underlying pathogenesis of any individual disorder may be unique, several common mechanisms appear to contribute to many of these conditions. In particular, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, apoptosis, and (neuro)inflammation are significant contributing factors in the pathogenesis of multiple CNS disorders. Therefore, agents that are capable of mitigating one or more of these factors may be beneficial in slowing down the progression of neuronal cell dysfunction or death and, in turn, in reducing the clinical burden for patients afflicted by these disorders. “Nutraceuticals” is a term commonly used to describe natural products derived from foods that possess significant biological activity leading to therapeutic benefits. Nutraceuticals such as polyphenols are well-known but these natural products are found in many chemical variations. For the current Special Issue, we seek the submission of articles focused on the interrogation of nutraceuticals as potential therapeutics for diverse CNS disorders. We are particularly interested in mechanistic studies performed in cell culture systems, invertebrates, or rodents, as well as investigations conducted in preclinical disease models. The overarching goals of this Special Issue are to highlight the potential utility of nutraceuticals in treating CNS disorders and to identify gaps in this field of inquiry which may stimulate future research.

Prof. Dr. Daniel Linseman
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutraceuticals is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nutraceuticals
  • natural products
  • polyphenols
  • antioxidants
  • anti-inflammatory
  • anti-apoptotic
  • neurodegeneration
  • Alzheimer’s
  • Parkinson's disease
  • amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

19 pages, 949 KiB  
Review
The Effect of Oral GABA on the Nervous System: Potential for Therapeutic Intervention
by Shahad Almutairi, Amaya Sivadas and Andrea Kwakowsky
Nutraceuticals 2024, 4(2), 241-259; https://doi.org/10.3390/nutraceuticals4020015 - 6 May 2024
Viewed by 1180
Abstract
Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS), plays a pivotal role in maintaining the delicate balance between inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission. Dysregulation of the excitatory/inhibitory balance is implicated in various neurological and psychiatric disorders, emphasizing the critical [...] Read more.
Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS), plays a pivotal role in maintaining the delicate balance between inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission. Dysregulation of the excitatory/inhibitory balance is implicated in various neurological and psychiatric disorders, emphasizing the critical role of GABA in disease-free brain function. The review examines the intricate interplay between the gut–brain axis and CNS function. The potential impact of dietary GABA on the brain, either by traversing the blood–brain barrier (BBB) or indirectly through the gut–brain axis, is explored. While traditional beliefs questioned GABA’s ability to cross the BBB, recent research challenges this notion, proposing specific transporter systems facilitating GABA passage. Animal studies provide some evidence that small amounts of GABA can cross the BBB but there is a lack of human data to support the role of transporter-mediated GABA entry into the brain. This review also explores GABA-containing food supplements, investigating their impact on brain activity and functions. The potential benefits of GABA supplementation on pain management and sleep quality are highlighted, supported by alterations in electroencephalography (EEG) brain responses following oral GABA intake. The comprehensive overview encompasses GABA’s sources in the diet, including brown rice, soy, adzuki beans, and fermented foods. GABA’s presence in various foods and supplements, its association with gut microbiota, and its potential as a therapeutic strategy for neurological disorders are thoroughly examined. The articles were retrieved through a systematic review of the databases: OVID, SCOPUS, and PubMed (keywords “GABA”, “oral GABA“, “sleep”, “cognition”, “neurodegenerative”, “blood-brain barrier”, “gut microbiota”, “supplements” and “therapeutic”, and by searching reference sections from identified studies and review articles). This review presents the relevant literature available on the topic and discusses the mechanisms, effects, and hypotheses that suggest oral GABA benefits range from neuroprotection to blood pressure control. The literature suggests that oral intake of GABA affects the brain illustrated by changes in EEG scans and cognitive performance, with evidence showing that GABA can have beneficial effects for multiple age groups and conditions. The potential clinical and research implications of utilizing GABA supplementation are vast, spanning a spectrum of diseases ranging from neurodegeneration to blood pressure regulation. Importantly, recommendations for the use of oral GABA should consider the dosage, formulation, and duration of treatment as well as potential side effects. Effects of GABA need to be more thoroughly investigated in robust clinical trials to validate efficacy to progress the development of alternative treatments for a variety of disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Nutraceuticals in Central Nervous System Disorders)
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16 pages, 1892 KiB  
Review
Resveratrol and Neuroinflammation: Total-Scale Analysis of the Scientific Literature
by Michele Goulart dos Santos, Diele Bopsin da Luz, Fernanda Barros de Miranda, Rafael Felipe de Aguiar, Anna Maria Siebel, Bruno Dutra Arbo and Mariana Appel Hort
Nutraceuticals 2024, 4(2), 165-180; https://doi.org/10.3390/nutraceuticals4020011 - 22 Mar 2024
Viewed by 935
Abstract
Neuroinflammation plays a crucial role in the development of various neurological diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, leading to significant neuronal dysfunction. Current treatments involve the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and steroids; however, they are associated with serious adverse effects, limiting their efficacy. Exploring [...] Read more.
Neuroinflammation plays a crucial role in the development of various neurological diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, leading to significant neuronal dysfunction. Current treatments involve the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and steroids; however, they are associated with serious adverse effects, limiting their efficacy. Exploring natural products with anti-inflammatory properties appears promising, with resveratrol, a polyphenol found in various plants, standing out for its potential benefits. Studies on resveratrol and its anti-inflammatory properties have been increasing in recent years, and analyzing the profile of this knowledge area can bring benefits to the scientific community. Therefore, this study conducted bibliometric analyses, using “resveratrol AND neuroinflammation” as search terms in the Web of Science Core Collection database. The analysis, performed with VOSviewer software version 1.6.18, encompasses 323 publications. Key terms in the studies include “resveratrol”, “neuroinflammation”, and “oxidative stress”, with China leading in the number of publications. The Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul in Brazil emerges as the institution with the highest contribution, and a phase 2 clinical study on resveratrol was the most cited. These results provide an overview of the global research landscape related to resveratrol and neuroinflammation, aiding decision making for future publications and advancing scientific understanding in this field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Nutraceuticals in Central Nervous System Disorders)
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