Special Issue "Synthesis and Applications of Functionalized Gold Nanosystems"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 March 2019)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Paolo M. Scrimin

Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Padova, Padova, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nanozymes; supramolecular cooperativity; gold nanoparticles; phosphate cleavage

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleague,

Gold-based nanosystems constitute one of the most interesting systems in the nanoworld because of the broad spectrum of applications they can find, ranging from analyte detection, nanomedicine and the mimicry of enzymes, just to mention a few examples. The size and shape of the nanoaggregates allow one to tune the properties of the gold core, while the introduction of specific functional groups on the passivating monolayer is portal to modulate the interaction with the surroundings: A target substrate, a protein, and a receptor. In spite of the fact that the literature on the field increases at an exponential rate, I believe that there is space for sound contributions that are able to conjugate the synthesis and applications of these nanosystems on solid experimental bases.

This Special Issue will cover all types of gold nanosystems and their applications. Original research contributions (full papers or communications), as well as reviews, either broad in scope or devoted to specific issues pertinent to gold nanosystems, will be considered. All submissions should be in line with the high-quality standard of the journal Nanometerials and will be subjected to a rigorous peer-review process. New synthetic protocols and new applications of gold nanosystems are particularly welcome. Submission of papers across different disciplines are highly encouraged in line with the interdisciplinary character of the journal.

For this reason, in view of your expertise in the field I am inviting you to contribute a manuscript (communication, full paper or review) to this special issue. As outlined above, the scope is broad and all types of gold nanosystems (from nanoparticles, to nanostars, nanorods, and nanowires) will be welcome, as well as all diverse applications one may envision for them.

I look forward to receiving a positive reply and wish you all the best in your scientific endeavors.

Best regards,

Prof. Paolo M. Scrimin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Gold nanoparticle
  • Gold nanorod
  • Gold nanostar
  • Gold nanowire
  • Nanomedicine
  • Nanozyme
  • Nanocatalysis
  • Sensing
  • Cooperativity

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Glucosamine Phosphate Induces AuNPs Aggregation and Fusion into Easily Functionalizable Nanowires
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(4), 622; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9040622
Received: 28 February 2019 / Revised: 7 April 2019 / Accepted: 10 April 2019 / Published: 17 April 2019
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Abstract
The challenge to obtain plasmonic nanosystems absorbing light in the near infrared is always open because of the interest that such systems pose in applications such as nanotherapy or nanodiagnostics. Here we describe the synthesis in an aqueous solution devoid of any surfactant [...] Read more.
The challenge to obtain plasmonic nanosystems absorbing light in the near infrared is always open because of the interest that such systems pose in applications such as nanotherapy or nanodiagnostics. Here we describe the synthesis in an aqueous solution devoid of any surfactant of Au-nanowires of controlled length and reasonably narrow dimensional distribution starting from Au-nanoparticles by taking advantage of the properties of glucosamine phosphate under aerobic conditions and substoichiometric nanoparticle passivation. Oxygen is required to enable the process where glucosamine phosphate is oxidized to glucosaminic acid phosphate and H2O2 is produced. The process leading to the nanosystems comprises nanoparticles growth, their aggregation into necklace-like aggregates, and final fusion into nanowires. The fusion requires the consumption of H2O2. The nanowires can be passivated with an organic thiol, lyophilized, and resuspended in water without losing their dimensional and optical properties. The position of the broad surface plasmon band of the nanowires can be tuned from 630 to >1350 nm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthesis and Applications of Functionalized Gold Nanosystems)
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Open AccessArticle Regioselective DNA Modification and Directed Self-Assembly of Triangular Gold Nanoplates
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(4), 581; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9040581
Received: 4 February 2019 / Revised: 11 March 2019 / Accepted: 28 March 2019 / Published: 9 April 2019
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Abstract
As a class of emerging nanoparticles, gold nanotriangles (AuNTs) are characterized by unique structural anisotropy and plasmonic properties. The organization of AuNTs into well-defined architecture potentially promises collective properties that are difficult to produce by individual AuNTs. To date, however, the orientation-controlled self-assembly [...] Read more.
As a class of emerging nanoparticles, gold nanotriangles (AuNTs) are characterized by unique structural anisotropy and plasmonic properties. The organization of AuNTs into well-defined architecture potentially promises collective properties that are difficult to produce by individual AuNTs. To date, however, the orientation-controlled self-assembly of AuNTs has been achieved with limited success. Here, we describe an effective and straightforward approach to induce directed self-assembly of AuNTs. By taking advantage of the uneven chemical reactivity of AuNT surfaces, we implement regioselective modification of the edges and the top/bottom surfaces with two different double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) sequences. By means of terminal single base pairing/unpairing, controlled assembly of the dsDNA-modified AuNTs evolves in a face-to-face or edge-to-edge manner based on blunt-end stacking interaction on an intentional region of the AuNTs, along with entropic repulsion by unpaired terminal nucleobases on the other region. This approach could be useful for achieving directed self-assembly of other anisotropic nanoparticles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthesis and Applications of Functionalized Gold Nanosystems)
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Open AccessArticle Facile Synthesis of the Composites of Polyaniline and TiO2 Nanoparticles Using Self-Assembly Method and Their Application in Gas Sensing
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(4), 493; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9040493
Received: 1 February 2019 / Revised: 14 March 2019 / Accepted: 22 March 2019 / Published: 30 March 2019
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Abstract
The composites of polyaniline and TiO2 nanoparticles with different contents were prepared in the aqueous solution of phosphoric acid, in which the phosphoric acid was selected as the protonic acid to improve the conductivity of polyaniline. In the composites, the TiO2 [...] Read more.
The composites of polyaniline and TiO2 nanoparticles with different contents were prepared in the aqueous solution of phosphoric acid, in which the phosphoric acid was selected as the protonic acid to improve the conductivity of polyaniline. In the composites, the TiO2 nanoparticles with the size of about 20 nm were coated by a layer of polyaniline film with a thickness of about 5 nm. Then, the gas sensors were constructed by a liquid–gas interfacial self-assembly method. The gas-sensing properties of the composites-based gas sensors obviously improved after doping with TiO2 nanoparticles, and the sensor response of the composites increased several times to NH3 from 10 ppm to 50 ppm than that of pure polyaniline. Especially when the mass ratio of TiO2 to aniline monomer was 2, it exhibited the best gas response (about 11.2–50 ppm NH3), repeatability and good selectivity to NH3 at room temperature. The p–n junction structure consisting of the polyaniline and TiO2 nanoparticles played an important role in improving gas-sensing properties. This paper will provide a method to improve the gas-sensing properties of polyaniline and optimum doping proportion of TiO2 nanoparticles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthesis and Applications of Functionalized Gold Nanosystems)
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Open AccessArticle Chiral Effect at Nano-Bio Interface: A Model of Chiral Gold Nanoparticle on Amylin Fibrillation
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(3), 412; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9030412
Received: 2 February 2019 / Revised: 25 February 2019 / Accepted: 5 March 2019 / Published: 11 March 2019
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Abstract
Protein/Peptide amyloidosis is the main cause of several diseases, such as neurodegenerative diseases. It has been widely acknowledged that the unnatural fibrillation of protein/peptides in vivo is significantly affected by the physical and chemical properties of multiscale biological membranes. For example, previous studies [...] Read more.
Protein/Peptide amyloidosis is the main cause of several diseases, such as neurodegenerative diseases. It has been widely acknowledged that the unnatural fibrillation of protein/peptides in vivo is significantly affected by the physical and chemical properties of multiscale biological membranes. For example, previous studies have proved that molecule chirality could greatly influence the misfolding, fibrillation and assembly of β-Amyloid peptides at the flat liquid-solid surface. However, how the nanoscale chirality influences this process remains unclear. Here we used gold nanoparticles (AuNPs, d = 4 ± 1 nm)—modified with N-isobutyl-L(D)-cysteine (L(D)-NIBC) enantiomers—as a model to illustrate the chiral effect on the amylin fibrillation at nano-bio interface. We reported that both two chiral AuNPs could inhibit amylin fibrillation in a dosage-dependent manner but the inhibitory effect of L-NIBC-AuNPs was more effective than that of D-NIBC-AuNPs. In-situ real time circular dichroism (CD) spectra showed that L-NIBC-AuNPs could inhibit the conformation transition process of amylin from random coils to α-helix, while D-NIBC-AuNPs could only delay but not prevent the formation of α-helix; however, they could inhibit the further conformation transition process of amylin from α-helix to β-sheet. These results not only provide interesting insight for reconsidering the mechanism of peptides amyloidosis at the chiral interfaces provided by biological nanostructures in vivo but also would help us design therapeutic inhibitors for anti-amyloidosis targeting diverse neurodegenerative diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthesis and Applications of Functionalized Gold Nanosystems)
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Open AccessArticle Effect of Size on Hydrogen Adsorption on the Surface of Deposited Gold Nanoparticles
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(3), 344; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9030344
Received: 24 January 2019 / Revised: 12 February 2019 / Accepted: 20 February 2019 / Published: 3 March 2019
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Abstract
An experimental study of molecular hydrogen adsorption on single gold nanoparticles of various sizes deposited on the surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was carried out by means of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The effect of size on the HOPG/Au system [...] Read more.
An experimental study of molecular hydrogen adsorption on single gold nanoparticles of various sizes deposited on the surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was carried out by means of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The effect of size on the HOPG/Au system was established. Hydrogen was dissociatively chemisorbed on the surface of gold nanoparticles with an average size of 5–6 nanometers. An increase in the size of nanoparticles to 10 nm or more led to hydrogen chemisorption being inhibited and unable to be detected. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthesis and Applications of Functionalized Gold Nanosystems)
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Open AccessArticle Resorcinol Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles for Formaldehyde Colorimetric Detection
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(2), 302; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9020302
Received: 8 January 2019 / Revised: 15 February 2019 / Accepted: 18 February 2019 / Published: 22 February 2019
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Abstract
Gold nanoparticles functionalized with resorcinol moieties have been prepared and used for detecting formaldehyde both in solution and gas phases. The detection mechanism is based on the color change of the probe upon the aggregation of the nanoparticles induced by the polymerization of [...] Read more.
Gold nanoparticles functionalized with resorcinol moieties have been prepared and used for detecting formaldehyde both in solution and gas phases. The detection mechanism is based on the color change of the probe upon the aggregation of the nanoparticles induced by the polymerization of the resorcinol moieties in the presence of formaldehyde. A limit of detection of 0.5 ppm in solution has been determined. The probe can be deployed for the detection of formaldehyde emissions from composite wood boards. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthesis and Applications of Functionalized Gold Nanosystems)
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Open AccessArticle Mesoporous Silica-gold Films for Straightforward, Highly Reproducible Monitoring of Mercury Traces in Water
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(1), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9010035
Received: 26 November 2018 / Revised: 14 December 2018 / Accepted: 20 December 2018 / Published: 28 December 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (6589 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Trace-level detection of mercury in waters is connected with several complications including complex multistep analysis routines, applying additional, harmful reagents increasing the risk of contamination, and the need for expensive analysis equipment. Here, we present a straightforward reagent-free approach for mercury trace determination [...] Read more.
Trace-level detection of mercury in waters is connected with several complications including complex multistep analysis routines, applying additional, harmful reagents increasing the risk of contamination, and the need for expensive analysis equipment. Here, we present a straightforward reagent-free approach for mercury trace determination using a novel thin film sampling stick for passive sampling based on gold nanoparticles. The nanoparticles supported on a silicon wafer and further covered with a thin layer of mesoporous silica. The mesoporous silica layer is acting as a protection layer preventing gold desorption upon exposure to water. The gold nanoparticles are created by thermal treatment of a homogenous gold layer on silicon wafer prepared by vacuum evaporation. This gold-covered substrate is subsequently covered by a layer of mesoporous silica through dip-coating. Dissolved mercury ions are extracted from a water sample, e.g., river water, by incorporation into the gold matrix in a diffusion-controlled manner. Thus, the amount of mercury accumulated during sampling depends on the mercury concentration of the water sample, the accumulation time, as well as the size of the substrate. Therefore, the experimental conditions can be chosen to fit any given mercury concentration level without loss of sensitivity. Determination of the mercury amount collected on the stick is performed after thermal desorption of mercury in the gas phase using atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Furthermore, the substrates can be re-used several tens of times without any loss of performance, and the batch-to-batch variations are minimal. Therefore, the nanogold-mesoporous silica sampling substrates allow for highly sensitive, simple, and reagent-free determination of mercury trace concentrations in waters, which should also be applicable for on-site analysis. Successful validation of the method was shown by measurement of mercury concentration in the certified reference material ORMS-5, a river water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthesis and Applications of Functionalized Gold Nanosystems)
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Open AccessArticle Green Preparation of Ag-Au Bimetallic Nanoparticles Supported on Graphene with Alginate for Non-Enzymatic Hydrogen Peroxide Detection
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(7), 507; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8070507
Received: 13 June 2018 / Revised: 2 July 2018 / Accepted: 5 July 2018 / Published: 8 July 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3532 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In this work, a facile, environmentally friendly method was demonstrated for the synthesis of Ag-Au bimetallic nanoparticles (Ag-AuNPs) supported on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) with alginate as reductant and stabilizer. The prepared Ag-AuNPs/RGO was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy [...] Read more.
In this work, a facile, environmentally friendly method was demonstrated for the synthesis of Ag-Au bimetallic nanoparticles (Ag-AuNPs) supported on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) with alginate as reductant and stabilizer. The prepared Ag-AuNPs/RGO was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicated that uniform, spherical Ag-AuNPs was evenly dispersed on graphene surface and the average particle size is about 15 nm. Further, a non-enzymatic sensor was subsequently constructed through the modified electrode with the synthesized Ag-AuNPs/RGO. The sensor showed excellent performance toward H2O2 with a sensitivity of 112.05 μA·cm−2·mM−1, a linear range of 0.1–10 mM, and a low detection limit of 0.57 μM (S/N = 3). Additionally, the sensor displayed high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability for the detection of H2O2. The results demonstrated that Ag-AuNPs/RGO has potential applications as sensing material for quantitative determination of H2O2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthesis and Applications of Functionalized Gold Nanosystems)
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Review

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Open AccessReview DNA-Assisted Assembly of Gold Nanostructures and Their Induced Optical Properties
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(12), 994; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8120994
Received: 2 November 2018 / Revised: 22 November 2018 / Accepted: 22 November 2018 / Published: 1 December 2018
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Abstract
Gold nanocrystals have attracted considerable attention due to their excellent physical and chemical properties and their extensive applications in plasmonics, spectroscopy, biological detection, and nanoelectronics. Gold nanoparticles are able to be readily modified and arranged with DNA materials and protein molecules, as well [...] Read more.
Gold nanocrystals have attracted considerable attention due to their excellent physical and chemical properties and their extensive applications in plasmonics, spectroscopy, biological detection, and nanoelectronics. Gold nanoparticles are able to be readily modified and arranged with DNA materials and protein molecules, as well as viruses. Particularly DNA materials with the advantages endowed by programmability, stability, specificity, and the capability to adapt to functionalization, have become the most promising candidates that are widely utilized for building plenty of discrete gold nanoarchitectures. This review highlights recent advances on the DNA-based assembly of gold nanostructures and especially emphasizes their resulted superior optical properties and principles, including plasmonic extinction, plasmonic chirality, surface enhanced fluorescence (SEF), and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthesis and Applications of Functionalized Gold Nanosystems)
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